The Steampunk Forum at Brass Goggles
October 22, 2017, 12:25:24 am *
Welcome, Guest. Please login or register.
Did you miss your activation email?

Login with username, password and session length
News: Support BrassGoggles! Donate once or $3/mo.
 See details here.
 
   Home   Blog Help Rules Login Register  
Pages: [1] 2   Go Down
  Print  
Author Topic: Where are the Steampunks?  (Read 1490 times)
Genna8
Swab

United Kingdom United Kingdom


« on: October 26, 2016, 11:16:41 pm »

Since becoming more and more involved with SP - and expanding my wardrobe accordingly - It feels great to be going out in clothing that is actually fun and exciting to wear! I had imagined taking my place in my nearest city (Sheffield) with followers of other fashion styles - goth, emo, metal etc. However, I've noticed that - outside of Asylum, WGW, Haworth and the like that I haven't seen one single person (at least not that I've been aware off) dressed in SP attire. Is there some unwritten rule that says SPs can only wear their clothing at special events? Where is everyone? I like to think that when I'm out in public that I am going some way towards inspiring others to appreciate the SP style - but it would sure be great to see the occasional like minded individual.
Logged
Caledonian
Zeppelin Admiral
******
Netherlands Netherlands


the dragon's called Salmacis


« Reply #1 on: October 27, 2016, 08:50:34 am »

I would love to dress steampunk all day every day but my mom won't allow that. (Still living with my parents you see)
Logged

"Crazy pseudo-scot living in a fantasy world"
AstorKaine
Officer
***
United Kingdom United Kingdom


Officer Commanding, Martian Expeditionary Force


« Reply #2 on: October 27, 2016, 02:02:20 pm »

Is there some unwritten rule that says SPs can only wear their clothing at special events? Where is everyone? I like to think that when I'm out in public that I am going some way towards inspiring others to appreciate the SP style - but it would sure be great to see the occasional like minded individual.

There are no rules, as such, but I think for many of us, it's not practical to be dressed in SP attire all the time (as much I'd like to).

That said, I do try to incorporate a little Steam into my daily/work attire - like a my vintage spectacles, a waistcoat and pocket watch, my favourite Cog cufflinks, or something discreet to denote my love of all things SP but that's not going to become either distracting or problematic. It's certainly not out of fear of ridicule or shame, it's more a practical choice that means I can still enjoy SP without having to answer 'Why are you dressed like that?' every five minutes.
Logged
Kensington Locke
Officer
***
United States United States


« Reply #3 on: October 27, 2016, 02:19:21 pm »

It might be a matter of practicality.

Modern fashion+hygiene expects us to change clothes every day (aka not wear the same thing everyday).  People notice if you've worn the same outfit twice.

That's not quite how Victorian fashion worked, but we're in the 21st century and social norms here are different.

How many of us have enough outfits?  Personally, I only have 1 steampunk outfit. Consider the Trousers and shirt as your most basic component to get swapped out and cleaned, and I have no spares.

So for me, dressing up as SteamPunk is a hobby and special event kind of thing.

For others, going SP all day everyday is totally doable.

So let's consider the social angle.  Once you're past school age (including college), many of us have jobs or social lives where dressing exotically makes us out of step with our peer groups.  Kind of like how you won't see any Goths working at a bank.  That's not a bad thing.  Why do you think all those Victorians dressed the way they did?  For the same reason, they were dressing the part they played in society.

I know we see famous SP people who wear the stuff all the time.  But they have jobs that are about being SP.  Most of us do not get to dress eccentrically in everyday life.  Not that we can't, but we can't.
Logged
Major Wolfram Quicksilver
Zeppelin Overlord
*******
United Kingdom United Kingdom


If you can't make a mistake you can't make a thing


« Reply #4 on: October 27, 2016, 05:18:47 pm »

I try to include steampunk elements in nearly everything I wear.
Logged

'This job looks complicated, get a bigger hammer!'

'The 4lb lump hammer, also known as a Birmingham Screwdriver'

'Knowledge is knowing that a tomato is a fruit.  Wisdom is never putting them in a fruit salad.'
Caledonian
Zeppelin Admiral
******
Netherlands Netherlands


the dragon's called Salmacis


« Reply #5 on: October 27, 2016, 06:03:20 pm »

It might be a matter of practicality.

Modern fashion+hygiene expects us to change clothes every day (aka not wear the same thing everyday).  People notice if you've worn the same outfit twice.

That's not quite how Victorian fashion worked, but we're in the 21st century and social norms here are different.

How many of us have enough outfits?  Personally, I only have 1 steampunk outfit. Consider the Trousers and shirt as your most basic component to get swapped out and cleaned, and I have no spares.

So for me, dressing up as SteamPunk is a hobby and special event kind of thing.

For others, going SP all day everyday is totally doable.

So let's consider the social angle.  Once you're past school age (including college), many of us have jobs or social lives where dressing exotically makes us out of step with our peer groups.  Kind of like how you won't see any Goths working at a bank.  That's not a bad thing.  Why do you think all those Victorians dressed the way they did?  For the same reason, they were dressing the part they played in society.

I know we see famous SP people who wear the stuff all the time.  But they have jobs that are about being SP.  Most of us do not get to dress eccentrically in everyday life.  Not that we can't, but we can't.

As a student i guess i could wear whatever but money is tight. (Even if the mother wasn't a problem)
Logged
Cora Courcelle
Snr. Officer
****
England England



« Reply #6 on: October 27, 2016, 06:43:29 pm »

I try to include steampunk elements in nearly everything I wear.

I have what I call 'soft' steampunk looks, which are steampunk inspired but just toned down a notch or two to cope with the 'real' world - can't drive a car in a hooped petticoat! And lots of bags, jewellery etc is ok for everyday although I can't wear a lot of them them to work because my job has certain dress restrictions.
Logged

You have to tread a fine line between avant-garde surrealism and getting yourself sectioned...
annevpreussen
Gunner
**
United States United States


Captain Annemarie of the Eagle's Arrow Airship


« Reply #7 on: October 27, 2016, 08:01:12 pm »

Since becoming more and more involved with SP - and expanding my wardrobe accordingly - It feels great to be going out in clothing that is actually fun and exciting to wear! I had imagined taking my place in my nearest city (Sheffield) with followers of other fashion styles - goth, emo, metal etc. However, I've noticed that - outside of Asylum, WGW, Haworth and the like that I haven't seen one single person (at least not that I've been aware off) dressed in SP attire. Is there some unwritten rule that says SPs can only wear their clothing at special events? Where is everyone? I like to think that when I'm out in public that I am going some way towards inspiring others to appreciate the SP style - but it would sure be great to see the occasional like minded individual.

Here we are!

Like most others on this thread, I would absolutely love to wear my steamier outfits all of the time, but alas! Practicality prohibits it. Like AstorKaine, Major Quicksilver, and Ms. Courcelle, I find it fun to sneakily include steampunk themes in my everyday outfits without going all out. Cheesy
Logged

I wear goggles so you can't see when I'm staring at you.
Kevin C Cooper Esq
Zeppelin Captain
*****
United Kingdom United Kingdom


Asymetry is the bane of my life


WWW
« Reply #8 on: October 27, 2016, 08:31:27 pm »


  Kind of like how you won't see any Goths working at a bank.  That's not a bad thing.  Why do you think all those Victorians dressed the way they did?  For the same reason, they were dressing the part they played in society.

Here's a contemporary account of Victorian clerks on their way tp work in finance, commerce and government offices.
Logged

James Harrison
Immortal
**
England England


Bachelor of the Arts; Master of the Sciences


« Reply #9 on: October 27, 2016, 08:42:20 pm »

Heh; I recall a few years ago I did dress vaguely Vicwardian on a daily basis (that was when I was a student in a fairly large city).  I wouldn't dare do it in my hometown; you may as well paint a big bullseye on yourself or go abroad in town with a banner reading 'easy target right here' behind you.  At least University cities are, in my experience, more open to the strange and unusual.   

In practical terms it requires a fairly large amount of formal clothing (unless you're the sort who wears the same shirt for several days)- and there's the problem; expense.  Either buying new, or buying vintage. And if you buy vintage, it is very easy to fall into the trap of not wearing it too often 'as it would be a shame to damage it needlessly' (which is why my 1910s silk topper only very rarely ventures out of the house). 

Which is probably why you don't see people dressed in the fashion of the 1890s-1910s very often.
Logged

Persons intending to travel by open carriage should select a seat with their backs to the engine, by which means they will avoid the ashes emitted therefrom, that in travelling generally, but particularly through the tunnels, prove a great annoyance; the carriage farthest from the engine will in consequence be found the most desirable.
frances
Zeppelin Captain
*****
United Kingdom United Kingdom



« Reply #10 on: October 27, 2016, 09:27:09 pm »

For me it takes too long to put it all on.  There are the layers and the accessories - an extra half an hour, maybe more if I have an unusual hair-do and have to fix on a hat too.
Logged
steiconi
Gunner
**
United States Minor Outlying Islands United States Minor Outlying Islands



« Reply #11 on: October 28, 2016, 04:06:32 am »

I live in a "locals" area of Hawaii.  Most people wear tee shirts and jeans for everyday clothes; if you wear anything the least bit "tropical" (or different in other ways), you're pegged as a tourist and treated as such. 

It's not pretty being asked, "It's next to Walmart.  Do you know where that is?"

That said, steampunk is too hot to wear here. Most of my clothes are sleeveless and lightweight.
Logged
Stella Gaslight
Moderator
Time Traveler
*
United States United States


Looking for a few good lobsters.


WWW
« Reply #12 on: October 30, 2016, 08:02:00 pm »

I like to wear my fancy clothes when ever I get the chance but that isn't often.  My job would ruin my clothes and corsets are hard to lift product in.  But if I get a day off I like to dress up.
Logged

I have a picture blog thinger now
http://stella-gaslight.tumblr.com/

Look for me on Etsy
http://www.etsy.com/shop/ByGaslight
J. Wilhelm
╬ Admiral und Luftschiffengel ╬
Board Moderator
Immortal
**
United States United States


Sentisne fortunatum punkus? Veni. Diem meum comple


WWW
« Reply #13 on: October 30, 2016, 10:29:01 pm »

I agree with all of the above. YEt, there are ways to set yourself apart while still meeting modern "peer standards." I'm surprised by how much dress code standards are being liberalised as time goes by, so I've decided I don't have to wear a very conservative hairstyle. I let my true inner self be expressed by wearing an unusual hairstyle (for men that is).

You see,  I left college in 2002, having a definite idea of how I should look when going for a job interview. At college, they told use nothing less than Pin-stripe / black suit, wing tip shoes and Oxford shirt would do.  We tend to be conservative in Aerospace engineering, you see?

But the other day I went for an interview for an internship at a small aeronautical company. When the engineering team leader saw me, he jabbed at me by stating "oh, I left my smoking [suit] back at home." That was at the very start of the interview  Undecided

Well! I never thought that a black pinstripe suit and red tie would offend anyone! There's a first time for everything I guess. I guess he totally missed my gender-bending 1920's flapper haircut. He was too focused on the pin stripe and perfect titanium shirt Cheesy

But that's how I bend the social norms while not breaking them Cheesy  The point being that you can always find a way to be yourself.
Logged

annevpreussen
Gunner
**
United States United States


Captain Annemarie of the Eagle's Arrow Airship


« Reply #14 on: October 31, 2016, 03:07:15 pm »

Well! I never thought that a black pinstripe suit and red tie would offend anyone! There's a first time for everything I guess. I guess he totally missed my gender-bending 1920's flapper haircut. He was too focused on the pin stripe and perfect titanium shirt Cheesy

But that's how I bend the social norms while not breaking them Cheesy  The point being that you can always find a way to be yourself.

"Gender-bending 1920's flapper," huh? That sounds so interesting!!! I think it's great that mainstream society is getting used to more unorthodox fashion styles. Keep on bending those genders and, er, flapper-ing!  Grin
Logged
Kensington Locke
Officer
***
United States United States


« Reply #15 on: October 31, 2016, 08:37:16 pm »


  Kind of like how you won't see any Goths working at a bank.  That's not a bad thing.  Why do you think all those Victorians dressed the way they did?  For the same reason, they were dressing the part they played in society.

Here's a contemporary account of Victorian clerks on their way tp work in finance, commerce and government offices.


Cool find.  Seems like nothing changes.  On one hand, society is described as highly conformist (pics of men in suits and hats abound), and on the other wide ranges of personalization and deviation are going on.

Logged
J. Wilhelm
╬ Admiral und Luftschiffengel ╬
Board Moderator
Immortal
**
United States United States


Sentisne fortunatum punkus? Veni. Diem meum comple


WWW
« Reply #16 on: November 01, 2016, 09:55:22 am »

Well! I never thought that a black pinstripe suit and red tie would offend anyone! There's a first time for everything I guess. I guess he totally missed my gender-bending 1920's flapper haircut. He was too focused on the pin stripe and perfect titanium shirt Cheesy

But that's how I bend the social norms while not breaking them Cheesy  The point being that you can always find a way to be yourself.

"Gender-bending 1920's flapper," huh? That sounds so interesting!!! I think it's great that mainstream society is getting used to more unorthodox fashion styles. Keep on bending those genders and, er, flapper-ing!  Grin

Yep. Gender bending. It is a classic "shingle bob," so called because it has a strong  "A-Line" (angled toward the front) and with a patch of closely shaved hair at the nape of the neck (the "shingle"). I actually learned to cut it myself with a mirror and a strip of masking tape (!). I'm sure you've seen it a 1000 times before, although women tend to wear it longer nowadays compared to the 1920s, and instead of the shingle they tend to "bevel" the hair in the back (which makes it impossible to cut yourself).

The hairstyle was made in the 1920s specifically for gender bending actually. It's much older than that, I'm sure, as some even call it an "Egyptian Bob", but in the 20s the purpose was to make women look more boyish. The idea was that the girls would "hang out with the boys." I'm taking it back to the male side Cheesy  

Silent movie actress / Flapper icon Louise Brooks


I always loved that cut on women, actually (as I'm attracted to women), but at some point it's something I decided to own myself as part of my own gender variant identity. So it was a natural for me.

Spoiler (click to show/hide)
« Last Edit: November 01, 2016, 10:08:22 am by J. Wilhelm » Logged
von Corax
Squire of the Lambda Calculus
Board Moderator
Immortal
**
Canada Canada

Prof. Darwin Prætorius von Corax


« Reply #17 on: November 01, 2016, 10:08:01 am »

From the front, at least, that looks very 1960s to me for some reason.
Logged

By the power of caffeine do I set my mind in motion
By the Beans of Life do my thoughts acquire speed
My hands acquire a shaking
The shaking becomes a warning
By the power of caffeine do I set my mind in motion
The Leverkusen Institute of Paleocybernetics is 5838 km from Reading
J. Wilhelm
╬ Admiral und Luftschiffengel ╬
Board Moderator
Immortal
**
United States United States


Sentisne fortunatum punkus? Veni. Diem meum comple


WWW
« Reply #18 on: November 01, 2016, 10:12:06 am »

From the front, at least, that looks very 1960s to me for some reason.

Oh it's been re-done a 1000 times. I could wear it shorter like the Louise Brooks photo with a shallow A-Line. Instead, I prefer a longer front and a very short back, so the A-line is very strong. I don't have shots from the back...

My length is about this long 2-3 weeks after I cut it - the A-Line and shingle are the same:
Spoiler (click to show/hide)

When longer, all around, a lot of people say it looks very "mod" as in the Beatles. The difference is that "mod" men don't wear the A-Line, and instead the back of the hair is even longer (reverse A-Line), and dishevelled.

John Alec Entwistle, when he was in The Who
Spoiler (click to show/hide)

That look has gone around the block many times, it keeps cropping up, just tuned to the style of the decade (1990s Goth girls loved the 1920s look too).

Another Flapper haircut, the even-more boyish "Eton" haircut was worn by model Twiggy in the 1960s.

Spoiler (click to show/hide)
« Last Edit: November 01, 2016, 10:49:45 am by J. Wilhelm » Logged
SeVeNeVeS
Immortal
**
England England



« Reply #19 on: November 01, 2016, 10:37:53 am »

Ok. not being a Fashionista, I think the only difference between the 1920's picture and Our good Mr  Wilhelm is the fringe length, cut slightly higher to reveal the eyebrows a little more and carbon copy a go go..........

(not really for me to comment on hairstyles, shaved grade 2 here necessity rather than choice, damn you non follically challenged people.......)
Logged

J. Wilhelm
╬ Admiral und Luftschiffengel ╬
Board Moderator
Immortal
**
United States United States


Sentisne fortunatum punkus? Veni. Diem meum comple


WWW
« Reply #20 on: November 01, 2016, 10:51:58 am »

Ok. not being a Fashionista, I think the only difference between the 1920's picture and Our good Mr  Wilhelm is the fringe length, cut slightly higher to reveal the eyebrows a little more and carbon copy a go go..........

(not really for me to comment on hairstyles, shaved grade 2 here necessity rather than choice, damn you non follically challenged people.......)

For some reason I hate the bangs (fringes) to be too high above my eyebrows. You got to have a not-too-square forehead for that (some Goth girls sport really really short orange/red-hair bangs - that would not look good over my Spanish "square" forehead  Cheesy
Logged
Aubreay Fallowfield
Snr. Officer
****
United Kingdom United Kingdom



« Reply #21 on: November 01, 2016, 11:13:36 am »

I walk EVERYWHERE with my steampunk cane made by Mr Kevin Cooper Esq. I have been clocked on several occasions as having a "very steam punk walking cane" as one chap said to me in my local market
« Last Edit: November 01, 2016, 02:27:15 pm by Aubreay Fallowfield » Logged

Tis' bona to vada your dolly old eke.
Sludge Van Diesel
Zeppelin Captain
*****
England England


SteampunkDJ.co.uk


WWW
« Reply #22 on: November 01, 2016, 02:16:33 pm »

I tend to dress in a vaguely Vicwardian / Steampunk lite style on a daily basis.  Trousers, collarless shirt, waistcoat (with watch chain), tweeds, lace up brogue boots, Prince Edward jackets etc.  If wearing a hat, it's usually a cap, fedora, or occasionally a bowler or my low top hat.  Things like my tall topper, goggles, my velvet Prince Edwards etc are usually reserved for special occasions (gigs, festivals, Steampunk events etc).  Currently wearing a white collarless shirt, tan moleskin waistcoat, chocolate brown chinos, & tan brogues (having removed my tweed newsboy cap & corduroy jacket when I got in from doing the weekly shop).  My moustache is usually waxed, or at the very least the ends brushed outwards so I resemble the Pringles man, but with the amount of Hipsters about these days, nobody bats an eyelid at that.

I really only tend to wear jeans & t shirts now if I'm doing something that I'm likely to get dirty, & trackies & t shirt if I'm having a sloppy doss around the house day.

TBH, as a male it's not too hard to dress in a way that could signify Steampunk without drawing attention to yourself.  I could see it being a touch more difficult for ladies though.
Logged

Better to study for one hour with the wise, than to drink wine with the foolish

www.steampunkdj.co.uk  Please follow me on Twitter https://twitter.com/SteampunkDJ & Facebook https://www.facebook.com/steampunkdj
Caledonian
Zeppelin Admiral
******
Netherlands Netherlands


the dragon's called Salmacis


« Reply #23 on: November 01, 2016, 05:46:59 pm »

Spoiler (click to show/hide)

I guess my everyday look does give me away as a steampunk, despite not being vicwardian
Logged
Sludge Van Diesel
Zeppelin Captain
*****
England England


SteampunkDJ.co.uk


WWW
« Reply #24 on: November 01, 2016, 06:01:11 pm »

Spoiler (click to show/hide)

I guess my everyday look does give me away as a steampunk, despite not being vicwardian
I'd say so
Logged
Pages: [1] 2   Go Up
  Print  
 
Jump to:  

Powered by MySQL Powered by PHP Powered by SMF 1.1.20 | SMF © 2013, Simple Machines Valid XHTML 1.0! Valid CSS!
Page created in 0.76 seconds with 16 queries.