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Author Topic: Victorian Houses  (Read 867 times)
Antipodean
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« on: October 18, 2016, 11:35:53 pm »

There are some wonderful houses to be found on this Facebook site.
It is well worth spending a little time on their photos pages.
There are many gems to be appreciated.

https://www.facebook.com/victorianhouses/


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Hurricane Annie
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« Reply #1 on: October 19, 2016, 03:55:33 am »



There are interesting house small and large on that page

Is there other pages with  intriguing old houses ?
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Antipodean
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New Zealand New Zealand



« Reply #2 on: October 19, 2016, 08:35:12 am »

From the landing page you can view more on the Photos and Video buttons n the lefthand menu
More Photos
https://www.facebook.com/victorianhouses/photos/?ref=page_internal

A Few Videos.
https://www.facebook.com/victorianhouses/videos/
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Hurricane Annie
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« Reply #3 on: October 20, 2016, 06:42:53 am »

 
George clarke is on TV 3  tonight at 7.30  with a Georgian  home
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Birdnest
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« Reply #4 on: October 28, 2016, 06:39:36 am »

Currently living here ... the Ann Starrett Mansion in Port Townsend, WA




until our actual house closes escrow.  Smiley
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« Reply #5 on: October 28, 2016, 07:15:52 am »

Currently living here ... the Ann Starrett Mansion in Port Townsend, WA




until our actual house closes escrow.  Smiley


You might as well give us the whole tour!

http://www.starrettmansion.com/
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Antipodean
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New Zealand New Zealand



« Reply #6 on: October 28, 2016, 10:19:26 am »

Very nice.
Are the owners into Steampunk? or just like Victoriana?
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J. Wilhelm
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« Reply #7 on: November 13, 2016, 10:47:24 am »

Oh well.  I think I'll repost this one, even though it's been posted many times.

Naturally I'm talking about the Littlefield House, in Austin, Texas, now part of the University of Texas at Austin, and which used to be the private residence of a benefactor of the university.

The house was designed by Architect James Wahrenberger, and built in 1893 for a Confederate veteran, Major George Littlefield. There is a sad yet hilarious story surrounding Major Littlefield, because he was said to be very eccentric and paranoid after the US Civil War.  He has been rumored to have made his servants stay up at night and shine light on the garden, as he feared another invasion from the Union Forces. He is also known to have influenced a decision whereby all main entrances to buildings were facing the south, looking away from the north, as well as having all statues face south.

In spite of his eccentricity and all the negative connotations from the historical period, Littlefield's contributions to the University of Texas were significant, of perhaps now controversial in the context of the Post Civil Rights Era.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Littlefield_House



https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/George_W._Littlefield


Another interesting house is not Victorian, but rather Georgian, and to be more specific, Georgian Revival.  The Texas Federation of Women's Clubs Mansion which was designed by Henry Coke Knight,  and financed with help from philanthropist Clara Driscoll. The mansion was finished in 1931,  so clearly this is a more modern structure, but in fact very few Georgian Revival houses exist, because in the 1930s and 1940s the Revival style fell out of fashion and many of these houses were demolished or renovated in more contemporary styling. Today the house serves as a historical preservation site and is operated as a for-hire venue for public and private functions,  including the Austin Swing's Syndicate dance parties, "Thursdays at the Fed"

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Texas_Federation_of_Women%27s_Clubs_Headquarters
http://themansion.info/


Last month, we held a wake for my Aunt (RIP) at the mansion, and I had never visited the building.  Besides a dance hall, the house features a rather interesting electrical circuit console which I'm sure many of you would probably kill for,  or perhaps be willing to buy for a few body parts you might be willing to forgo.

This is your humble servant standing in front of the electrical control panel.


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Crescat Scientia
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Fabricator and temporally confused.


« Reply #8 on: November 17, 2016, 11:06:06 pm »

Oh well.  I think I'll repost this one, even though it's been posted many times.

Naturally I'm talking about the Littlefield House, in Austin, Texas, now part of the University of Texas at Austin, and which used to be the private residence of a benefactor of the university.

The house was designed by Architect James Wahrenberger, and built in 1893 for a Confederate veteran, Major George Littlefield. There is a sad yet hilarious story surrounding Major Littlefield, because he was said to be very eccentric and paranoid after the US Civil War.  He has been rumored to have made his servants stay up at night and shine light on the garden, as he feared another invasion from the Union Forces. He is also known to have influenced a decision whereby all main entrances to buildings were facing the south, looking away from the north, as well as having all statues face south.

In spite of his eccentricity and all the negative connotations from the historical period, Littlefield's contributions to the University of Texas were significant, of perhaps now controversial in the context of the Post Civil Rights Era.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Littlefield_House



https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/George_W._Littlefield


Another interesting house is not Victorian, but rather Georgian, and to be more specific, Georgian Revival.  The Texas Federation of Women's Clubs Mansion which was designed by Henry Coke Knight,  and financed with help from philanthropist Clara Driscoll. The mansion was finished in 1931,  so clearly this is a more modern structure, but in fact very few Georgian Revival houses exist, because in the 1930s and 1940s the Revival style fell out of fashion and many of these houses were demolished or renovated in more contemporary styling. Today the house serves as a historical preservation site and is operated as a for-hire venue for public and private functions,  including the Austin Swing's Syndicate dance parties, "Thursdays at the Fed"

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Texas_Federation_of_Women%27s_Clubs_Headquarters
http://themansion.info/


Last month, we held a wake for my Aunt (RIP) at the mansion, and I had never visited the building.  Besides a dance hall, the house features a rather interesting electrical circuit console which I'm sure many of you would probably kill for,  or perhaps be willing to buy for a few body parts you might be willing to forgo.

This is your humble servant standing in front of the electrical control panel.





Thank you for some stunning pictures.
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Birdnest
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« Reply #9 on: November 26, 2016, 12:23:49 am »

Very nice.
Are the owners into Steampunk? or just like Victoriana?

No ... unfortunately, the owners are 'out of town' investors.. and the management is not remotely steampunk, nor do they visibly participate in our Victorian ways. (it is run as lodging).  It's a pretty house though.
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RJBowman
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« Reply #10 on: November 27, 2016, 01:42:49 am »

Here's an interesting one:
http://www.ruthmere.org/

The home of the founder of Miles Laboratories, preserved and restored. I took there tour back circa '82. The garage has a rotating circle in the floor because the cars back then didn't have a reverse gear, which may give you an idea of the era. There really ought to be more photos on the web site, but you can find a bunc through Google Images:
https://www.google.com/search?q=ruthmere&espv=2&source=lnms&tbm=isch&sa=X&ved=0ahUKEwiDlN3C1sfQAhVD34MKHer5BLkQ_AUICSgC&biw=1164&bih=768

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J. Wilhelm
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« Reply #11 on: November 28, 2016, 08:57:00 am »

Here's an interesting one:
http://www.ruthmere.org/

The home of the founder of Miles Laboratories, preserved and restored. I took there tour back circa '82. The garage has a rotating circle in the floor because the cars back then didn't have a reverse gear, which may give you an idea of the era. There really ought to be more photos on the web site, but you can find a bunc through Google Images:
https://www.google.com/search?q=ruthmere&espv=2&source=lnms&tbm=isch&sa=X&ved=0ahUKEwiDlN3C1sfQAhVD34MKHer5BLkQ_AUICSgC&biw=1164&bih=768




Ruthmere Mansion, Elkhart, Indiana, United States, 1910

That house was built in 1910.  It falls under the French architectural school of "Beaux-Arts." Interesting because a great number of buildings and residences in Mexico City share that exact style. Partly because of French influence, and partly because these buildings commemorate the Revolution (Civil war) of 1910.

Palacio de Bellas Artes (lit. Palace of Fine Arts <-> Beaux Arts <-> Bellas Artes),
Mexico City (Construction begun in 1904 and was interrupted and  finished in 1932 due to Civil War)

Casa del Lago ("House on the Lake")  Juan Jose Arreola, National Autonomous University, Mexico. Originally the Automobile Club of Mexico, 1908
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