The Steampunk Forum at Brass Goggles
October 23, 2017, 12:41:01 pm *
Welcome, Guest. Please login or register.
Did you miss your activation email?

Login with username, password and session length
News: Brassgoggles.co.uk - The Lighter Side Of Steampunk, follow @brasstech for forum technical problems & updates.
 
   Home   Blog Help Rules Login Register  
Pages: [1]   Go Down
  Print  
Author Topic: Found This On Pinterest... What Kind of Jacket Is That???  (Read 980 times)
Mme. Ratchet
Officer
***
United States United States


« on: September 12, 2016, 09:19:23 am »



Seriously, what on earth is this jacket? I need one. Or a pattern to make one? Can somebody help?
Logged
Cora Courcelle
Snr. Officer
****
England England



« Reply #1 on: September 12, 2016, 09:48:18 am »

Can't help with a pattern I'm afraid, but I agree - its a great look.
Maybe use a fitted jacket pattern and add epaulettes and pockets?
Logged

You have to tread a fine line between avant-garde surrealism and getting yourself sectioned...
Banfili
Zeppelin Captain
*****
Australia Australia



« Reply #2 on: September 12, 2016, 10:11:36 am »

It looks like something Amelia Peabody would wear - but with a divided skirt, and without the ruffles.
Logged
Madasasteamfish
A clanger waiting to be dropped......
Moderator
Rogue Ætherlord
*
United Kingdom United Kingdom


09madasafish
« Reply #3 on: September 12, 2016, 11:18:39 am »

It looks to be some sort of military tunic, though cut to suit a female figure. Something like this might be a good starting point if you want to make one of your own.



If I had to guess I'd say the maker has obtained a pattern for a man's tunic then adjusted it (bringing it in at the waist and adding the pleats to the sleeves).
Logged

I made a note in my diary on the way over here. Simply says; "Bugger!"

"DON'T THINK OF IT AS DYING, JUST THINK OF IT AS LEAVING EARLY TO AVOID THE RUSH."
walking stick
Zeppelin Admiral
******
England England


« Reply #4 on: September 12, 2016, 11:49:40 am »

I'm pretty sure this is customised but the two nearest designs I know of are a Royal Indian Army Khaki Jacket or a Safari Jacket.  
Logged
SeVeNeVeS
Immortal
**
England England



« Reply #5 on: September 12, 2016, 12:27:04 pm »

Yup, that is bespoke and based on a standard Khaki military jacket but with added feminine frills and fuffles, really well done tho'.

Instantly reminded me of The Extraordinary Adventures of Adèle Blanc-Sec in a way.

Spoiler (click to show/hide)

Logged

montysaurus
Deck Hand
*
United States United States


« Reply #6 on: September 12, 2016, 07:20:12 pm »

http://www.folkwear.com/130.html Its is a safari jacket. Here is a sewing pattern.
Logged
Mme. Ratchet
Officer
***
United States United States


« Reply #7 on: September 12, 2016, 07:59:59 pm »

I really appreciate all the help, everyone! I have something to work with now, I think. I want one really bad, and figured the best (and more funner!) way would be to make it my own self, but needed something to go off of to get a pattern. Trying to figure out a specific hat, as well. Not my smoking cap, but another which looks like a 30s Pill Box hat, but it's on Gurkha soldiers (specifically a few from the 44th Gurkha Rifles), and the photo is dated 1896. I will share that if anyone is willing to help me figure out what on earth it is.
Logged
steiconi
Gunner
**
United States Minor Outlying Islands United States Minor Outlying Islands



« Reply #8 on: September 13, 2016, 10:42:35 am »

I think you could use any simple front-button shirt for the body, using a band collar and front.  The pockets have nifty pleats that would be easy to do but add style.

To get the extra puffy gathers at the top of the sleeve, redraw the top of the sleeve pattern taller (I'd guess about 2"), tapering off to the original pattern when you get to the front and back notches.

Post a picture of the hat you want to make...please?

There are some costume books available free on Project Gutenburg.  search for costume, dressmaking, millinery

Here's one  that might help   Make Your Own Hats by Gene Allen Martin http://www.gutenberg.org/ebooks/19740

« Last Edit: September 13, 2016, 10:48:20 am by steiconi » Logged
Mme. Ratchet
Officer
***
United States United States


« Reply #9 on: September 14, 2016, 07:04:35 am »

https://www.pinterest.com/pin/468515167464418153/ The hats that these three members of the 44th Gurkha Rifles are wearing Cheesy
Logged
steiconi
Gunner
**
United States Minor Outlying Islands United States Minor Outlying Islands



« Reply #10 on: September 14, 2016, 07:19:10 pm »

My, what an fearsome trio of warriors!

Those hats are pretty simple; the top is a circle, the sides a long rectangle. 
I would use a layer of felt for shape*, with an outer fabric and a lining.  If you're in a hurry, you could skip the lining.
Measure your head where the hat would perch, and use that as length of the sides and the circumference of the circle.   I would guess that the sides of the lighter-colored hats are about 3" (7.5cm) tall.

Cut the felt to those measurements.

Using the same measurements, add seam allowances to the long edges of the hat sides and around the edge of the circle.  Cut the lining and outer fabric to these measurements.

If you wish to machine stitch on any embellishments, add them now.  If you're going to embroider the outer fabric, do it before you cut out the pieces.

Seam the short ends of outer fabric sides to make a loop.  Right sides of the outer fabric together, stitch the hat sides to top.  For a crisp edge, fold the seam allowance down, and top stitch the side as close as possible to the seam.
Repeat with lining.  You can skip the topstitching.

Place the felt circle on the wrong side of the outer fabric.  Loosely hand baste the felt top to the seam allowance (i.e., don't let your stitches show on the outside of the hat, and don't stitch so tightly that the fabric pulls).

Butt the short ends of the felt sides together, and hand baste to hold.
Place this felt ring against the wrong side of the outer fabric side, and baste to the seam allowance at the top.  Turn the hat right side out.  Make sure it looks nice, and fix any stitches that show or pull.
Fold the lower edge of the outer fabric around the bottom of the felt and baste in place, not letting stitches show on the outside.

Add chin straps.  Experiment with placement, but they'll have to be pretty close to opposite each other or the hat will flap up and down.  Stitch the straps to the felt and seam allowance, without the stitches showing on the outer fabric.  The straps were likely leather, and would need some kind of buckle somewhere to adjust the fit.  They look rather uncomfortable.

Fold and press the lower edge of the lining up, a little more than your seam allowance.  Place lining in hat and hand stitch around the bottom edge.  Tack the lining to the upper seam as well, catching just the felt and seam allowance, not the outer fabric. Turn hat right side out and make sure the lining doesn't sag into view.  You're done.

This actually took even longer to type than it looks because I came up with 3 ways to make the hat.  I think this is the simplest and will look the most professional. 

*most older hats use buckram for shape, and that would work.  But it collapses when it gets wet, so I think it would be a bad choice for a soldier; who wants a hat that collapses in the rain?

Logged
Mme. Ratchet
Officer
***
United States United States


« Reply #11 on: September 15, 2016, 01:44:05 am »

That method of construction is nearly identical to how I've been working on my smoking cap, actually... Do you have any idea what they are called? And what's Buckram? Lord I have a lot of questions about it altogether, actually.
Logged
Gregor
Snr. Officer
****
United States United States



« Reply #12 on: September 15, 2016, 03:32:11 am »

They had more photos of the jacket after following the link, but alas the image was from like 2009.
http://shoomlah.livejournal.com/170616.html

She mentions the jacket may be from around 1910 military, but WHO"S military? lol

I am glad I followed this thread, I am working on a character/persona for a novel who is a somewhat reluctant wild west geologist and her sight had some good ideas in the comments.

Anyway, hope this helps and Cheers! - gregor
Logged

Could somebody Pleeease explain to my mother that it is steam PUNK not steam PIMP!?!
Mme. Ratchet
Officer
***
United States United States


« Reply #13 on: September 15, 2016, 05:52:58 am »

The jacket screams "British Africa" to me, but I may be projecting a bit.
Logged
steiconi
Gunner
**
United States Minor Outlying Islands United States Minor Outlying Islands



« Reply #14 on: September 16, 2016, 02:57:39 am »

buckram is a loosely woven fabric treated with starch.  It can be dampened and stretched into shape over a hat block or other form.
It's used in hats, masks, large costume pieces.  There are probably new products that do the job better.
Logged
Hurricane Annie
Zeppelin Captain
*****
New Zealand New Zealand



« Reply #15 on: September 16, 2016, 06:32:22 pm »



It is a  classic  ladies safari jacket. They come back into fashion  from time to time .

Scour the op shops for patterns or a jacket to remodel
Logged
Steam Titan
Snr. Officer
****
United States United States


fulgur adducere


« Reply #16 on: September 19, 2016, 04:03:44 pm »

Made me think of Jane Porter
Logged
Mme. Ratchet
Officer
***
United States United States


« Reply #17 on: September 19, 2016, 08:05:35 pm »

I was informed that the hats these soldiers are wearing is called a "Kilmarnock hat"  and was a British undress hat worn by many colonial forces, but were worn by gurkhas well past anyone else.
Logged
Prof. Cecily
Snr. Officer
****
Spain Spain



« Reply #18 on: September 20, 2016, 10:50:06 am »

Good morning, ladies and gentlemen.
Oh, my. That jacket is a must-have.

I remain yours,
Prof. Cecily
Logged
Hez
Zeppelin Captain
*****
Canada Canada


aka Miss Primrose C Leigh


« Reply #19 on: September 20, 2016, 07:51:37 pm »

My guess is that it is a frankenpattern.  As in:  body from a safari jacket pattern + darts to fit the female form + slightly pooffed sleeves from a Victorian bodice pattern + pleated (upper) pockets adapted from cargo pants + three times the usual number of buttons = truly fabulous and unique.  
Well unique until you make one.
Logged
Mme. Ratchet
Officer
***
United States United States


« Reply #20 on: September 20, 2016, 08:03:47 pm »

It will still be unique because I would inject my own special flavor in to the design.
Logged
Hez
Zeppelin Captain
*****
Canada Canada


aka Miss Primrose C Leigh


« Reply #21 on: September 22, 2016, 09:27:53 am »

Which I certainly hope you will be kind enough to show us.
Logged
Mme. Ratchet
Officer
***
United States United States


« Reply #22 on: September 22, 2016, 08:44:57 pm »

Naturally. Smiley Just one more project in the list lol
Logged
Crescat Scientia
Zeppelin Captain
*****
United States United States


Fabricator and temporally confused.


« Reply #23 on: October 04, 2016, 10:23:11 pm »

Ignore the pockets and look at the seams of the garment in order to see what this really is.

That is a standard late Victorian woman's bodice buttoned up the front with slightly gathered cap
sleeves (look at the top of the shoulders), two darts on each side of the front to accommodate a corset (visible between the upper and lower pockets), and a peplum waist.

Then four patch pockets are applied over it.

Truly Victorian sells some very good patterns of standard cuts of women's bodices.  I am sure they sell something exactly like this (minus the pockets).
Logged

Living on steam isn't easy.
-- Jessica Fortunato

Have you heard?  It's in the stars, next July we collide with Mars.
-- Cole Porter

That's not sinister at all.
-- Old family saying
Pages: [1]   Go Up
  Print  
 
Jump to:  

Powered by MySQL Powered by PHP Powered by SMF 1.1.20 | SMF © 2013, Simple Machines Valid XHTML 1.0! Valid CSS!
Page created in 0.239 seconds with 16 queries.