The Steampunk Forum at Brass Goggles
December 18, 2017, 04:06:51 am *
Welcome, Guest. Please login or register.
Did you miss your activation email?

Login with username, password and session length
News: Brassgoggles.co.uk - The Lighter Side Of Steampunk, follow @brasstech for forum technical problems & updates.
 
   Home   Blog Help Rules Login Register  
Pages: [1]   Go Down
  Print  
Author Topic: Technique... dry-rub with DRIED Rub & Buff.  (Read 661 times)
Harvey Midnight
Gunner
**
United States United States


« on: July 17, 2016, 05:48:25 pm »

I accidentally stumbled upon a painting technique that surprised me, how good it looked + how easy it was to do. What surprised me most, is how it seems even a dollop of hard & dried rub & buff is STILL very usable!!!! You can get enough of it on your fingers to do kind of a 'dry brush/dry rub' effect, that really works well.  Thought I'd share.

I normally use a dark gray acrylic paint as primer on the guns, etc, that I paint. I have recently started using rub & buff to make the metallics look better--  r&b is easier to use than metallic paints, which tend to drip and shift around as they dry.

But anyway, I was using silver rub & buff on the left side of a gun, to try and make it look like steel. I HATED it, and ended up quickly doing a wash-coat of black to 'dirty it up'-- as I did so, I ended up getting a tiny amount of rub & buff on my fingers, and acidentally 'dry-rubbing' a few spots onto the right side of the gun, which was still just the black grey primer.

But those spots looked FABULOUS!!!

So, soon as the wash-coat dried on the left side--- I stuck my fingers into a dollop of r&b which was completely dried--- and yet, it got silver on the tip of my finger, and I furiously rubbed it all over the right side of the gun. PERFECT effect--- altho it looks a little more dieselpunk than steampunk, I loved the RIGHT side of the gun so much more than the left, at this point.

Silver side:


Gun-metal side


Gonna try and experiment with some other colors--- maybe try the gold-leaf r&b over some tan or brown paint, etc, see if I can get a similar effect.
  
« Last Edit: July 17, 2016, 05:57:34 pm by Harvey Midnight » Logged
Atterton
Time Traveler
****

Only The Shadow knows


« Reply #1 on: July 17, 2016, 06:07:07 pm »

I'm sorry but you need a new name for this. No dry-rubbing in the buff please, it's very unvictorian.
Logged

Resurrectionist and freelance surgeon.
Harvey Midnight
Gunner
**
United States United States


« Reply #2 on: July 17, 2016, 06:12:58 pm »

I'm sorry but you need a new name for this. No dry-rubbing in the buff please, it's very unvictorian.

You're quite right--- sounds a bit improper, and a less-suggestive name is in order.

How about "fingered lustre"?
Logged
Hektor Plasm
Zeppelin Captain
*****
United Kingdom United Kingdom


All-Round Oddfellow.


WWW
« Reply #3 on: July 17, 2016, 06:24:08 pm »

I'm sorry but you need a new name for this. No dry-rubbing in the buff please, it's very unvictorian.

You're quite right--- sounds a bit improper, and a less-suggestive name is in order.

How about "fingered lustre"?

I'll take a small tub...  Shocked

HP
Logged

"all die! o, the embarrassment."
H Plasm Esq. ICUE    Avatar by and with kind permission of Dr Geof. Ta!!

Some musings:-
http://hektorplasm.blogspot.co.uk/
von Corax
Squire of the Lambda Calculus
Moderator
Immortal
*
Canada Canada

Prof. Darwin Prætorius von Corax


« Reply #4 on: July 17, 2016, 07:51:51 pm »

I'm sorry but you need a new name for this. No dry-rubbing in the buff please, it's very unvictorian.

You're quite right--- sounds a bit improper, and a less-suggestive name is in order.

How about "fingered lustre"?

Stroking the metal?
Logged

By the power of caffeine do I set my mind in motion
By the Beans of Life do my thoughts acquire speed
My hands acquire a shaking
The shaking becomes a warning
By the power of caffeine do I set my mind in motion
The Leverkusen Institute of Paleocybernetics is 5838 km from Reading
Hektor Plasm
Zeppelin Captain
*****
United Kingdom United Kingdom


All-Round Oddfellow.


WWW
« Reply #5 on: July 17, 2016, 10:33:42 pm »

I have noticed this tendency, despite the good effect it gives- does anyone know how to 'fix' rub'n'buf? It's a bit of a giveaway when the weathering comes off on your fingers...

HP
Logged
Drew P
Zeppelin Admiral
******
United States United States


« Reply #6 on: July 17, 2016, 11:31:12 pm »

Also, if it is used outdoors it tends to patinate when one doesn't want it to.
I tried a clear coat.......
Logged

Never ask 'Why?'
Always ask 'Why not!?'
Harvey Midnight
Gunner
**
United States United States


« Reply #7 on: July 18, 2016, 03:43:43 am »

Well.. I did try rubbing gold-leaf over dark brown paint--- I tried it on a squirt-gun that looks like an old 1950's raygun toy.   Bought a pile of them awhile back at the 'dollar-tree', and I use them to test things out.

While I like the look of it, it doesn't strictly look like metal. The brown paint left a LOT more of a rough texture than my 'pavement' usually does-- and, of course, the rub really accentuates any texture--- so the gun ended up looking like it was made out of some kind of metallic stone, like a shiny, brassy ore. Some kind of alien or fantasy weapon.



Not sure it'd be appropriate for a steampunk item.
« Last Edit: July 18, 2016, 03:54:15 am by Harvey Midnight » Logged
Atterton
Time Traveler
****

Only The Shadow knows


« Reply #8 on: July 18, 2016, 06:15:54 pm »

That design just screams dieselpunk.
Logged
Sir Farthington-Smythe
Gunner
**
Canada Canada



« Reply #9 on: July 23, 2016, 12:52:52 am »

...so the gun ended up looking like it was made out of some kind of metallic stone, like a shiny, brassy ore. Some kind of alien or fantasy weapon.

IMHO, the rough texture of the paint gives it a sand-cast look, as though it were cast in a mold made of hardened sand, much like the technique used to make various engine parts.  Then again, I am only seeing a picture.  Mayhaps that effect does not appear in reality.
Logged
Lord Pentecost
Snr. Officer
****
United Kingdom United Kingdom



WWW
« Reply #10 on: July 24, 2016, 03:41:02 pm »

...so the gun ended up looking like it was made out of some kind of metallic stone, like a shiny, brassy ore. Some kind of alien or fantasy weapon.

IMHO, the rough texture of the paint gives it a sand-cast look, as though it were cast in a mold made of hardened sand, much like the technique used to make various engine parts.  Then again, I am only seeing a picture.  Mayhaps that effect does not appear in reality.

I was about to say it has the look of cast brass before it is cleaned and polished, it's the idea finish for a practical weapon as you don't want reflections to give away your position.
Logged

"A lot of people never use their initiative because no-one told them to" - Banksy
Pages: [1]   Go Up
  Print  
 
Jump to:  

Powered by MySQL Powered by PHP Powered by SMF 1.1.20 | SMF © 2013, Simple Machines Valid XHTML 1.0! Valid CSS!
Page created in 0.193 seconds with 15 queries.