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Author Topic: Celluloid Collars  (Read 1365 times)
RJBowman
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« on: June 16, 2016, 09:44:43 pm »

On another thread, someone suggested cutting the collar off a shirt to create a period-look shirt. Some people might not know that removeable collars were worn with shirts of that type, including celluloid collars:



These were made of celluloid; an early type of plastic, best known for its use in photographic films. I first heard of these collars when I saw a beautiful preserved example at the Detroit Historical Museum many many years ago. The collar was smooth and glossy. It didn't look like something that I would want to wear in the summer.

The above photo shows a variety of styles that were available. If yours went out of style, you could replace just the collar instead of having to buy a whole new shirt.
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frances
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« Reply #1 on: June 16, 2016, 10:20:37 pm »

You could also just wash/clean the collar on it's own.
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Serrac
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« Reply #2 on: June 17, 2016, 05:14:23 pm »


One small problem with celluloid - As it ages, it starts to degrade, producing an oily residue and an unmistakable vinegar smell. At this point, it is highly flammable (even more so than stable celluloid) and prone to detonation.

The main ingredient of celluloid is nitrocellulose, otherwise known as guncotton - In its self, quite a good explosive !
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steiconi
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« Reply #3 on: June 17, 2016, 06:43:17 pm »

my goodness, a fashion accessory AND a weapon.  How steampunk!
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Atterton
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« Reply #4 on: June 17, 2016, 07:07:26 pm »

It seems the victorians themselves considered them a bit of a danger, judging by comic drawings from that time.
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frances
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« Reply #5 on: June 17, 2016, 09:48:32 pm »

Have you any examples of these for us to see?
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qui est in literis
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« Reply #6 on: June 18, 2016, 02:35:41 am »

Quick, someone incorporate this in a story. I want to see Victorian spies utilizing explosive collars.
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RJBowman
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« Reply #7 on: June 18, 2016, 07:13:11 am »

Have you any examples of these for us to see?

Here's someone's Etsy photo:


The one I saw in the museum was much whiter and cleaner looking.
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Atterton
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« Reply #8 on: June 18, 2016, 02:09:26 pm »

I have no examples, no.
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Serrac
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« Reply #9 on: June 18, 2016, 05:37:46 pm »

my goodness, a fashion accessory AND a weapon.  How steampunk!

Worn around the neck, it is more likely to be a suicide bomb of limited range.
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steiconi
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« Reply #10 on: June 18, 2016, 07:33:39 pm »

you whip it off and fling it like a frisbee (I beg your pardon) at your opponent.  The sharp edge severs his jugular, then the explosion takes out his companions.

my goodness, a fashion accessory AND a weapon.  How steampunk!

Worn around the neck, it is more likely to be a suicide bomb of limited range.
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Bines
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« Reply #11 on: June 19, 2016, 02:57:38 am »

Attached cloth shirt collars that folded down and ended in points were a thing in the late 19th century; mainly worn by polo players in England. Fans of the sport adopted the look.

Collared shirts were also worn in the US during the 1800s.

That said, detachable collars were the standard in casual shirts, and nearly always in dress shirts, if a collar was worn, until the 1930s.
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Miranda.T
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« Reply #12 on: June 19, 2016, 11:10:17 am »

The Victorians started to use celluloid (or 'parkesine') in lots of different applications before its drawbacks were realised - for example billiard balls, which did on occasion explode during a game. Have a look at http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-25259505 or look up the related BBC programme on YouTube.

Yours,
Miranda.
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frances
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« Reply #13 on: June 19, 2016, 08:33:57 pm »

Oh, I was hoping for cartoons of exploding celluloid collars.
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Cora Courcelle
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« Reply #14 on: June 19, 2016, 08:45:55 pm »

Oh, I was hoping for cartoons of exploding celluloid collars.

Sound like the sort of thing you'd get if Q was making devices for a steampunk James Bond. Now there's an idea ...
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Atterton
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« Reply #15 on: June 19, 2016, 09:28:24 pm »

Didn't one Bond movie feature exploding billiard balls? Anyways:

http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-2815225/How-Downton-inspired-starched-collar-revival-Laundry-service-reveals-period-dramas-fuelling-boom-demand-producing-80-000-collars-year.html
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RJBowman
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« Reply #16 on: June 20, 2016, 03:33:26 am »

Didn't one Bond movie feature exploding billiard balls? Anyways:

The Wild Wild West had exploding billiard balls.
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von Corax
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« Reply #17 on: June 20, 2016, 03:53:16 am »

The Victorians started to use celluloid (or 'parkesine') in lots of different applications before its drawbacks were realised - for example billiard balls, which did on occasion explode during a game. Have a look at http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-25259505 or look up the related BBC programme on YouTube.

Yours,
Miranda.


Would that count as a scratch, or would you take your shot over?
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Cora Courcelle
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« Reply #18 on: June 20, 2016, 11:59:41 am »

Didn't one Bond movie feature exploding billiard balls? Anyways:


So very many things explode in Bond movies it's difficult to keep track ...
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Ned Devine has Awoken
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« Reply #19 on: October 29, 2016, 06:14:56 pm »

Reproduction collars are still available, I just got some for reference for a museum project I am working on........

https://www.flickr.com/photos/35171459@N02/30525820782/in/album-72157674684356370/

« Last Edit: October 29, 2016, 06:21:29 pm by Ned Devine has Awoken » Logged

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Anita Reyes
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« Reply #20 on: January 22, 2017, 04:32:06 pm »

Other of the dangers of using these collars and more immediate is that some of them where so hard and long that could actually slowly asphyxiate the one who was wearing it. Terrifying indeed
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