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Author Topic: Rant about jewellery...  (Read 3643 times)
Kevin C Cooper Esq
Zeppelin Captain
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United Kingdom United Kingdom


Asymetry is the bane of my life


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« Reply #25 on: June 14, 2016, 08:34:01 pm »

It doesn't help when the quickest, nastiest, sloppiest "How to steampunk something" creation on Youtube is greeted with cries of "awesome" and "that's the most amazing/fabulous thing I've ever seen!!" By the way I love Youtube "How to videos" the good ones that is.
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Frogswim
Deck Hand
*
United States United States



« Reply #26 on: June 16, 2016, 02:25:06 am »

On this point, but a little off topic, I know some of mine look like this.

https://www.etsy.com/shop/CogsnCords?section_id=18156815

Are these a little too much this way? What could I do differently to improve them so they don't look tacked together. I agree with you OP about jewlery doing that, especially necklaces. Seems like it's either just a bunch of keys, or lace with some gears in it.
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Frogswim
Deck Hand
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United States United States



« Reply #27 on: June 16, 2016, 02:27:08 am »

On this point, but a little off topic, I know some of mine look like this.

https://www.etsy.com/shop/CogsnCords?section_id=18156815

Are these a little too much this way? What could I do differently to improve them so they don't look tacked together. I agree with you OP about jewlery doing that, especially necklaces. Seems like it's either just a bunch of keys, or lace with some gears in it.

Also, How do you guys feel about leather stamping gear impressions? I find it adds a nice bit of detailing to the underlying leather when you can't fit gears into a spot, or gears would simply look tacked on.
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Captain Trellis
Snr. Officer
****
England England


Auspicium melioris ævi


« Reply #28 on: June 16, 2016, 01:02:39 pm »

My dear Frogswim

Having perused your Etsy page, I see very little there that looks 'tacked together'.

What I do see, is a rather distinctive style, executed with considerable skill. Also, having some knowledge of the time required to produced these, they are attractively priced. You have a new admirer.

Well done.  Wink
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Frogswim
Deck Hand
*
United States United States



« Reply #29 on: June 18, 2016, 02:30:15 am »

My dear Frogswim

Having perused your Etsy page, I see very little there that looks 'tacked together'.

What I do see, is a rather distinctive style, executed with considerable skill. Also, having some knowledge of the time required to produced these, they are attractively priced. You have a new admirer.

Well done.  Wink

Thank you! I found that leatherworking was a good way to pass the time, then used it to pay for my student loans, and now pursue it full time. Crazy how stuff like that sucks you in.

But thank you for the kind words! Smiley
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VampirateMace
Zeppelin Captain
*****
United States United States


Mein Hexapod


« Reply #30 on: July 01, 2016, 06:25:54 am »

Sadly, I think crafting has been forced into the mass market.  In the 1990s, I used to design projects for craft magazines.  The rule of thumb was that 85% of the project should consist of buying manufactured items, and only 15% actual crafting.  (I even got a bonus from some manufacturers for featuring their products in a published design.  And if I said, "Paint it red," people would write in to ask what brand and color number red paint.)  In contrast, I have old craft books from the 1940s and earlier that have the crafter doing everything but grow the cotton and weave the fabric.

So if the do-it-yourselfer just expects to assemble a few items, a total non-crafter must have an immensely low expectation for originality or creativity and is probably thrilled by the metal cicada with the gears glued on.
This just explained so much about modern crafting, and why things that used to be 'crafts' are now 'art'.


I'm not sure how I feel about this though. On one hand I cringe every time I see one of those premade octopus pendants (you probably even know the one I'm talking about) with gears glued to it for sale. But on the other, if someone wants to buy it, it really doesn't effect me (unless they want me to make it, there's a dilemma, money or personal standards).
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Lord Pentecost
Snr. Officer
****
United Kingdom United Kingdom



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« Reply #31 on: July 01, 2016, 08:10:59 pm »

I am not a jewelery maker and I do not make items to sell, for me half the fun is finding interesting bits (especially parts of something that wouldn't normally be on show and re-purposing them into something unique,take my ray gun for example.



Working from right to left we have:
- The brass holder from a small fireside brush
- Two aluminum spacer rings from a harddrive
- The motor coils from a floppy disk drive
- Another aluminum spacer ring from a harddrive
- An aluminium plate from a harddrive
- Brass rod (the only think purchased new for this build)
- The pump from a soap dispenser
- An aluminium plate from a harddrive
- A piece of brass tubing with a ring at each end (no idea what this was from)
- A brass light bulb holder
- Internal parts from a really tacky chandelier
- Copper wire
- Another brass light bulb holder
- A 22mm to 3/4 inch pluming adapter
- The pressure gauge from a fire extinguisher
- A modified plane handle

No more than two of these items came from the same shop and many of them were free skip dive finds.
To me this is the fun of steampunk, take things which most people would say were rubbish and making something crazy out of them!

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"A lot of people never use their initiative because no-one told them to" - Banksy
Kensington Locke
Officer
***
United States United States


« Reply #32 on: July 02, 2016, 06:43:42 pm »

I would imagine, that when you've been heavily immersed in steampunk and seen it all, then some of the really common stuff starts looking bad.

But to an outsider or newcomer, having not seen more or better, they think it's the most different thing they've ever seen.

Kind of like the 3 wolf moon t-shirt.  everybody's seen one.  And when you first saw it in the 80's, it probably looked cool.  But knowing how common that print became, at some point it became a meme and aptly named "3 wolf moon"
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Crescat Scientia
Zeppelin Captain
*****
United States United States


Fabricator and temporally confused.


« Reply #33 on: July 03, 2016, 08:23:12 pm »

I am old enough to have seen several cycles of historical, often handcrafted things becoming popular and pale echoes becoming mass-produced, to the dismay of aficionados of the originals.

When I was very young I was annoyed at people who wore, displayed, or used shoddy knockoffs of the good stuff. 

When I was a little older I pitied them and felt superior to them. 

Later I realized that many people enjoy the feelings they get from such things.  Their enjoyment does not cause harm, and gentle and diplomatic education to help them recognize and appreciate real quality does not hurt.
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Living on steam isn't easy.
-- Jessica Fortunato

Have you heard?  It's in the stars, next July we collide with Mars.
-- Cole Porter

That's not sinister at all.
-- Old family saying
ArtWench Prime
Deck Hand
*
United States United States


Itinerant Artist


« Reply #34 on: July 27, 2016, 07:07:16 pm »

I'm a fine artist who is only this year finally dipping my piggy toe into the world of Steampunk and I must say, the OP's post distresses me no end. I see this sort of snobbery and exclusionism in the art world and I just hate it! It alienates the neophyte and repels many would be converts on top of making anyone who finds joy in such creations feel bad about themselves.

As a handicapped artist, I do not have access to a metal fabrication shop and do not have the money nor skills required to be a full fledged contraptor (though I wish I did). I am doomed to remain a coggler, relying on whatever salvaged bits of this and that I have collected over the years. So, even though I do not sell my Steampunk efforts, this post makes me feel like an idiot for attempting to create something out of plastic bits and bobs. Do you have any idea how much this negativity dulls my passion for the genre?

Why post something deriding the efforts of someone who is merely enjoying the craft? Are all the other Steampunks going to laugh at me when I debut my very first attempt at Steampunk at Dragon Con this year?
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Cora Courcelle
Snr. Officer
****
England England



« Reply #35 on: July 27, 2016, 08:13:26 pm »

Are all the other Steampunks going to laugh at me when I debut my very first attempt at Steampunk at Dragon Con this year?

I cannot imagine a Steampunk laughing at anyone who has put together their outfit, even if they have made none of it themselves; they certainly wouldn't laugh at anything someone had made for themselves and I believe we all respect others efforts to create; salvaged bits and bobs (in whatever material) are our lifeblood.
There is a lot of commercial 'stick a gear on it and call it steampunk' but if that encourages folk to enquire more deeply that's fine by me; I'll buy it if I like it too, but the quality of some of these pieces is not good and I frequently have to repair them almost as soon as I get them.
I suppose my feeling is that if you are going to stick a gear on it at least you should use enough glue! I personally keep glue factories in business.

So do, do continue to enjoy whatever you make and be proud when someone asks 'Where did you get that?' (and they will) to say 'I made it'.

[Oh dear, I appear to be stuck to the keyboard.....]


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You have to tread a fine line between avant-garde surrealism and getting yourself sectioned...
ArtWench Prime
Deck Hand
*
United States United States


Itinerant Artist


« Reply #36 on: July 27, 2016, 09:55:43 pm »

Thank you so much, Cora! I was beginning to feel quite discouraged. Though it would probably have taken an able bodied person a fraction of the time to do the same thing, it has taken me several months to cobble together my outfit & begin the process of Steampunking my electric chair. I'm far from done and only have a month left until the con. I know my efforts won't be to the level of many of this forum's members, I was just hoping for acceptance!
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Drew P
Zeppelin Admiral
******
United States United States


« Reply #37 on: July 28, 2016, 03:34:08 am »

As a side note: Ms. Steelhips is also an artist with physical restrictions.
She has finely honed her art and makes some very beautiful pieces.
Search the forum here to find some of her work (try the Trading area).

This is not to belittle your thoughts or abilities. There's a certain something when one sees a lot of the same mass produced items cobbled together and called "hand made", etc. while trying to make a real living actually working with ones abilities.

It may be late in the day to explain my view correctly or even in a way that makes sense so I shall pause to avoid misinterpretation.
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Never ask 'Why?'
Always ask 'Why not!?'
Prof. Cecily
Snr. Officer
****
Spain Spain



« Reply #38 on: July 28, 2016, 07:22:12 am »

Good morning, ladies andgentlemen.
As a side note: Ms. Steelhips is also an artist with physical restrictions.
She has finely honed her art and makes some very beautiful pieces.
Search the forum here to find some of her work (try the Trading area).

This is not to belittle your thoughts or abilities. There's a certain something when one sees a lot of the same mass produced items cobbled together and called "hand made", etc. while trying to make a real living actually working with ones abilities.

It may be late in the day to explain my view correctly or even in a way that makes sense so I shall pause to avoid misinterpretation.

I beg to disagree about it being late in the day, Drew P.
I, myself, enjoy long exchanges, when there's interest in refining and adapting our opinions.

I've seen this particular situation in more than enough Cons:
"There's a certain something when one sees a lot of the same mass produced items cobbled together and called "hand made", etc. while trying to make a real living actually working with ones abilities."

At Cons, I try to patronise artisans. But, occasionally, I'll see a piece made from"...a lot of the same mass produced items cobbled together" with charm and ingenuity and I'll buy it.

I think about this as the marathon of EuroSteamCons (from September through the first week of November) approaches in Spain.

I remain yours,
Prof. Cecily
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selectedgrub
Guest
« Reply #39 on: July 28, 2016, 08:16:26 am »

I'm a fine artist who is only this year finally dipping my piggy toe into the world of Steampunk and I must say, the OP's post distresses me no end. I see this sort of snobbery and exclusionism in the art world and I just hate it! It alienates the neophyte and repels many would be converts on top of making anyone who finds joy in such creations feel bad about themselves.

As a handicapped artist, I do not have access to a metal fabrication shop and do not have the money nor skills required to be a full fledged contraptor (though I wish I did). I am doomed to remain a coggler, relying on whatever salvaged bits of this and that I have collected over the years. So, even though I do not sell my Steampunk efforts, this post makes me feel like an idiot for attempting to create something out of plastic bits and bobs. Do you have any idea how much this negativity dulls my passion for the genre?

Why post something deriding the efforts of someone who is merely enjoying the craft? Are all the other Steampunks going to laugh at me when I debut my very first attempt at Steampunk at Dragon Con this year?

Do not let this worry you,
I have never seen any encouraging word on anyone's creation.
I think he just comes here to peddle his wares.
Unfortunately any new person, starting out, reading this will think twice about showing what they made for feeling inferior. I stand by my original comment.

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SeVeNeVeS
Immortal
**
England England



« Reply #40 on: July 28, 2016, 09:40:11 am »


Do not let this worry you,
I have never seen any encouraging word on anyone's creation.
I think he just comes here to peddle his wares.
Unfortunately any new person, starting out, reading this will think twice about showing what they made for feeling inferior.
I  have always tried to encourage new, fledgling makers where I can, but there are some rubbish on the Steampunk market (etsy ebay, cash in jobs). Hopefully these people will use any money made on selling mass produced jewelry and invest in better materials and equipment to develop an individual, unique design. We all have to start somewhere afterall.

Wares peddlers...... we have quite a few members here who really only post thier own creations, purchase site and rarely comment on others work, so, not that strange.

I'm rambling here, I guess what I'm trying to say is, please don't be afraid of posting your work, whatever it may be, some of us here are interested and will not judge.

Badly put, but I hope I got my message across. Undecided

 
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Drew P
Zeppelin Admiral
******
United States United States


« Reply #41 on: July 28, 2016, 11:33:49 am »

^This.


and Selectedgrub, I'm not sure what you mean:
We all see plenty of encouragement here.
Who's this "he just peddling wares"?


After a long day of Management and installation work it is too late in the day....

Maybe if I can get the chance and post up an example or 2, that would help clarify.
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SeVeNeVeS
Immortal
**
England England



« Reply #42 on: July 28, 2016, 11:53:39 am »

Who's this "he just peddling wares"?
I think what Mr Grub is trying to point out is, what I said earlier, some members log in, on ocassion, to premote the latest batch of products, with a convenient link to the sales site and rarely comment or contribute in any other form on a regular basis. (he should be she methinks)

I personally don't log in as often as I would like these days, life is pretty complicated lately. But I am not trying to sell something.............
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Cora Courcelle
Snr. Officer
****
England England



« Reply #43 on: July 28, 2016, 09:52:16 pm »

Thank you so much, Cora! I was beginning to feel quite discouraged. Though it would probably have taken an able bodied person a fraction of the time to do the same thing, it has taken me several months to cobble together my outfit & begin the process of Steampunking my electric chair. I'm far from done and only have a month left until the con. I know my efforts won't be to the level of many of this forum's members, I was just hoping for acceptance!

It's a pleasure, I'm glad to have reassured you.
You are also carrying on a noble tradition of being 'far from done'.  I am frequently sewing on fastenings, adding a last minute 'extra' etc the night before leaving for an event - and then coming home full of ideas for the next one.  In fact I think it's probably fair to say that we Steampunks are never actually finished - there's always more inspiration for another project on the horizon.  Just don't get so stressed about it that you forget to enjoy yourself!
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Drew P
Zeppelin Admiral
******
United States United States


« Reply #44 on: July 29, 2016, 12:13:30 am »

Ooooh, I scheee. Wink
That makes sense.
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ArtWench Prime
Deck Hand
*
United States United States


Itinerant Artist


« Reply #45 on: July 29, 2016, 05:22:21 pm »


Do not let this worry you,
I have never seen any encouraging word on anyone's creation.
I think he just comes here to peddle his wares.
Unfortunately any new person, starting out, reading this will think twice about showing what they made for feeling inferior. I stand by my original comment.


Thanks! Your words give me a tad more confidence!
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Crescat Scientia
Zeppelin Captain
*****
United States United States


Fabricator and temporally confused.


« Reply #46 on: August 07, 2016, 08:56:44 pm »


Do not let this worry you,
I have never seen any encouraging word on anyone's creation.
I think he just comes here to peddle his wares.
Unfortunately any new person, starting out, reading this will think twice about showing what they made for feeling inferior. I stand by my original comment.


Thanks! Your words give me a tad more confidence!

I am glad you got such positive responses to your post.

(And I had not realized that the original purpose of this thread might have been less than forthright.  Thank you, selectedgrub, for pointing that out.)

The more people enjoy their crafts and socializing and costumery, the better, and I see no good purpose in discouraging any level of participation.

I hope you have a lovely time with your steampunked wheelchair.  I have seen one or two people in such at conventions and they tend to get friendly attention.
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Otto Von Pifka
Zeppelin Admiral
******
United States United States


goggles? they're here somewhere.....


« Reply #47 on: August 11, 2016, 07:13:28 am »

it would seem that even with an artistic eye, you will find 90% of making a successful bit or bob is know how to hold it all together! the difference in most first time endeavors and later projects always seems to boil down to picking up skills for construction at each attempt.

usually you can spot the difference between a budding tinkerer and a quick buck shill if you look closely. the shill may know advanced construction techniques but wastes them on lazily planned pieces. the budding tinkerer may turn out a shoddy piece but is striving to improve skills and make better and better pieces. and usually when they ask for tips and guidance, the last person on the planet to chime in will be the shill. they see everyone as a potential competitor to making the easy buck from anyone they can.

my favorite posters are the "hey I'm new to this steam stuff, what can I make to earn a quick buck from all you people?" really?

make a door knob doily and use it on the way out...

I admire steelhips work, she has strived to make things to a level of perfection that's almost extinct now. hopefully others will also work to bring their game up to her level, the world needs more art just to keep from vomiting up all the barely adequate mass produced smegma shoved down our throats in this melba toast life (hmm, what's that bitter taste in my mouth? Wink )

anyways, everyone's eye back to your workbenches and back to work! you had lunch yesterday! harrumph.
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steiconi
Gunner
**
United States Minor Outlying Islands United States Minor Outlying Islands



« Reply #48 on: August 11, 2016, 08:35:17 pm »

I just participated in a contest to make a dollhouse-size witch's vanity table.  Entries seemed to fall into 3 categories: 
1) purpose-built for the contest;
2) an existing piece with a few witchy accessories added to qualify for the contest, and
3) did they even read what the contest was?

Category 2 seems to be where a lot of commercial steamjunk lands. 
Category 3 covers a lot of stuff offered on ebay as steampunk. 

http://www.minidolllist.com/witches/vanity%20contest.html shows the entries (mostly not steampunk, though one has a great stool with clockhand legs).  Mine is at the very bottom.
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frances
Zeppelin Captain
*****
United Kingdom United Kingdom



« Reply #49 on: August 11, 2016, 10:06:49 pm »

That was interesting.  Yes, the stool with the clock hands legs was a good idea.
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