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Poll
Question: How far should I go ?
Full on Diesel - 2 (15.4%)
Blast of Atomic - 0 (0%)
Subtle nuance - 2 (15.4%)
Vintage - 1 (7.7%)
Retro - 0 (0%)
Antipodean Revival - 0 (0%)
Industrial - 5 (38.5%)
Interbellum - 3 (23.1%)
Total Voters: 13

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Author Topic: Pimp My Abode  (Read 1427 times)
Hurricane Annie
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New Zealand New Zealand



« Reply #25 on: July 19, 2016, 05:58:46 am »

I'm not sold on the African skin cushions nor the fake stone fire surround.  But there is space so it definitely has potential.

Thank you for seding the potential of the work in progress. The "safari look"  is from the cheap make do cushions  on a bulk special. 


 Sadly those fake stones are real.  They come with the house.  They  are of the era in this  part of the world  . They have  green, grey  and pink tones. On the upside - they do go with the  cheap tacky tiki style cushions.  The cane chairs were gifted to me .  They will do for now until I find  something in maybe chintz.   The do however suit the  current cushions .

The fire place has a cast iron box of a more modern vintage  that really does not go with any decor theme
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« Reply #26 on: July 19, 2016, 07:11:56 am »

Dear Annie:

I see too many geometric lines, and also mixed use of natural materials such as stone and wood. Actually very modern, so I can understand why going to Interbellum might be attractive. Yet, I think that a compromise exists between Art Nouveau which is far too organic to fit those straight lines and an Art Deco which, while geometric is decidedly too cold and futuristic with ample use of man-made materials.

There is an alternate route which is vaguely similar and is younger than Art Nouveau by just a couple of years, but is far more geometric and "rectangular" and yet makes ample use of wood and stone. You probably have heard me talk about it before. Have you thought about going back to the 1901-1910s American "Prairie School of Architecture" started by Frank Lloyd Wright?

This was a style inspired from the American Frontier, with simple horizontal-geometries where hyper futurism (for 1901-1910 that is), was combined with traditional "pioneer" homes' materials like stone and wood, and plenty of abstract Native American symbolism was used as filigree in abstract leaded glass windows, for example. The style is also contemporary to the Arts and Crafts movement (also an American current), and thus it would fit and combine well with the Arts and Crafts, though Prairie is decidedly more futuristic.

It seems to fit the bill, IMHO. Especially over that fireplace. You would need a large rectangular wooden beam to serve as mantle piece. The brown of the wood would contrast with the white of the walls.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Prairie_School

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Willits_House

Willits House (1901) Start of Prarie House Period


Ward Willits House


Robie House (1909) End of Prarie House Period
The Robie House, Frank Lloyd Wright's Prairie Style Masterpiece



Modern house interiors and fireplaces loosely inspired by Prarie House:

http://www.theorganicarchitect.com/blog/2015/07/14/timeless-architecture-the-influence-of-frank-lloyd-wrights-organic-architecture/

http://www.houzz.com/photos/869281/Frank-Lloyd-Wright-Inspired-Home-eclectic-living-room-other-metro

~~~
« Last Edit: July 19, 2016, 08:20:51 am by J. Wilhelm » Logged

Hurricane Annie
Zeppelin Captain
*****
New Zealand New Zealand



« Reply #27 on: July 19, 2016, 08:13:19 am »

Tank you for sharing that.  it has centred me. I have long been an admirer of Frank Lloyd  Wright .  I had not  paid attention  to the Prairie house. [   the name conjures plate and log cabins ] .  Over the years New Zealand  architects  have often claimed a Lloyd Wright  influence.   I believe he and Macintosh would be rolling in their  individual graves over that.  Californian bungalows also were big here.

Homes of the pre 60s era were often a Mish mash of mis matched Arts and Crafts Vs Art Deco -  . And no one won.   My own last 2 homes included.

I was sitting here today thinking that a natural native wood manthe piece  could look effective. There are more lines than curves about the place  and mixed media in the build.   I will research the Prairie School of Architecture  in greater depth.  Let us hope that the local Salvation army store can cater more fully to my pecadillo. 

The more esoteric dilemma is - will it all go with the safari print cushions

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« Reply #28 on: July 19, 2016, 08:19:25 am »

Tank you for sharing that.  it has centred me. I have long been an admirer of Frank Lloyd  Wright .  I had not  paid attention  to the Prairie house. [   the name conjures plate and log cabins ] .  Over the years New Zealand  architects  have often claimed a Lloyd Wright  influence.   I believe he and Macintosh would be rolling in their  individual graves over that.  Californian bungalows also were big here.

Homes of the pre 60s era were often a Mish mash of mis matched Arts and Crafts Vs Art Deco -  . And no one won.   My own last 2 homes included.

I was sitting here today thinking that a natural native wood manthe piece  could look effective. There are more lines than curves about the place  and mixed media in the build.   I will research the Prairie School of Architecture  in greater depth.  Let us hope that the local Salvation army store can cater more fully to my pecadillo. 

The more esoteric dilemma is - will it all go with the safari print cushions



Well if we went with a "muppet orange" shaggy rug for the living room, I don't see why you couldn't have zebra cushions  Grin  Grroovy. Yeah, baby!
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J. Wilhelm
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« Reply #29 on: July 19, 2016, 08:21:22 am »

I would urge you to keep your colour palette limited to 3 colours maximum. The wood floor and brown furniture work perfectly together, and should be made to match the fireplace.

Yes I do believe in Minwax wood stain  Grin Oak, Cherry and Mahogany tones would give you more colour and much more light, or if you want to tone it down use Walnut. Don't use Pine or Maple, as that is far too light and modern rushing you into the 1970s. Either way, you'd be surprised how clean and elegant dark wood will look over plain white walls. Provided you limit the colour palette.

http://www.minwax.com/wood-products/stains-color-guide/

The third colour is up to you, but in my 1970s house in Mexico, the third colour was cobalt blue, and it tied into Spanish/Dutch/Chinese painted porcelain in the kitchen and blue glassware (plus a dark royal blue carpet, because this was the 1970s  Tongue - But surprisingly the white/dark brown/dark blue) combinations was very pleasing to the eyes and was found all over the house.
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Hurricane Annie
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New Zealand New Zealand



« Reply #30 on: July 19, 2016, 08:56:02 am »

The house is a classic of its time  ,  complete with fibro weather boards.



We  have a colour here  by the name of rimu for staining wood.  It is a native timber colour. The wood was used extensively  through out housing here,  along with kauri and matai.  My floors may be rimu . Those trees are now protected   as endangered.



The walls are a light stone colour that does set off natural  wood in a complimentary  way .  There is  bright orange  in some existing decor features ,  that can be changed.  A colour that has always  chosen me is a marine type green. Not a jade  or olive green  but a blend of the two. Mauve lilac is the other colour that always turns up  to haunt me - even if the  chart  or the light in the shop  shows a grey. A dark red seems to tie those colours together. I am trying to avoid the mauve - it's not easy to live with .   For now against the pale stone ,  the green  with red accents    sounds the go  to use for decorating 

Mexican , Portuguese  and Spanish homes  have a striking  but simple decor .  Effective  use of simple colours and lines . Spanish mission architectural style  was popular here  after big earth quake rebuilds  in the 20s and 30s.  I did consider that style when looking for a new home.
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J. Wilhelm
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« Reply #31 on: July 19, 2016, 10:33:35 am »

The computer colour for Fern, more or less falls in between Olive Green (left) and Jade (right), coincidentally Wink



Rimu is almost identical to Maple (Minwax 223 Colonial Maple) in hue and lightness. Kohekohe, in my opinion gets a lot closer to American Red Oak (Minwax 215 or 222) , and Puriri looks a lot like Walnut (Minwax 2716). I will assume the stone colour of the walls is very light, enough to be neutral. I sampled the Minwax colours and averaged them in GiMP image editor:


Fern / White / Walnut or Puriri



Fern / White / Maple or Rimu



Fern / White / Red Oak or Kohekohe



You can probably have a range of colours too:

Oddly enough this was the colour palette that we had in our house:

Cobalt Blue (top left) for glassware, and with white for plates/ceramic and kitchen tiles
Royal Blue (bottom left) for main area carpet.
White for walls
Terracota (centre right) for wall bricks and kitchen floor tiles
Walnut (top right) for cheap furniture, often housing Mexican artisanal decoration
Mahogany/Redwood for window frames and expensive furniture in living/dining area

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Hurricane Annie
Zeppelin Captain
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New Zealand New Zealand



« Reply #32 on: July 19, 2016, 05:53:20 pm »

I thought  you were waving the Mexican flag  ; }

Fern could be a close match . On looking  through the latest on line  colour charts  there were quirky points of reference .  Walnut , pine, oak, rosewood  etc and their variations in Dark and American .  I suspect these names were adapted to be "on trend ". Maybe the impending elections have trumped  the charts .

There was a link to trend colour palettes that have clearly been ripped from the steampunk - dieselpunk ethos  . Future past  in particular . Maybe Edwardian Gloom, Frozen Barren Wasteland, That Guys Basement We Escaped From , Sensory Deprivation  Tank  and Nana's  Kitchenette From 1967 would not have had the same ring to it

http://www.dulux.co.nz/specifier/colour/colour-forecast-2016

I like the Fern / Red Oak  combo.  It has the natural look, works well together and retains warmth to the colours that the nuetral stone is lacking.  

The Cobalt / Valencia orange combo rears it's ugly head from time to time  in the interior fashion trends.  When  utilised for decor accents it can be fabulous.  But not when the Paint dept. Guys have had a game of convincing  punters to use it for feature walls in the same room.  Hearts have been broken.

There was no colour scheme in  the house we grew up in. Not even "eclectic".  Though early on our mother did go through a short lived home upholstered  purple with orange fleck   phase .  She ripped that all out one afternoon in somewhat of a mania.  An insipid apple green is the only other colour that sticks to memory . The green woodgrain formica in bathroom and  bedroom [ my sister and mine] is ingrained  and traumatising   Huh   :'(  ( what was dad thinking Huh) He did on occasion express a desire to have everything built in like a ship.  But that is another conversation.

When the time to strike is right ,  sanding down  and a dark red wood stain will be under consideration.
« Last Edit: July 19, 2016, 05:56:07 pm by Hurricane Annie » Logged
J. Wilhelm
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« Reply #33 on: July 20, 2016, 07:52:19 am »

Flag waving not intended, but they do look like flags, yes? Not a bad idea.

You forgot "Tindalos Blue" and "Chthulu Green" and the iridescent "Colour Out of Space" which will swiftly bring madness to anyone who stares at it for too long. You will of course find also, Clinton Librarian Haystack, Trump Tuopee Bleach, and Obama Aging Charcoal.

Regarding Dulux, I don't know how to match their colours directly from RGB values so I have to match visually. What they have is the reverse lookup, that is RGB values listed from their colour palette. I have the exact RGB values for Minwax's colours from my GiMP (photo shop) software, which I got by blurring and fudging the Minwax sample pictures to a perfect color mix.

It looks like the Fern green is not quite the same but most similar to their "Colours of New Zealand" Otatara C181  and the Red Oak/ Kohekohe brown is most similar to their Monck's Bay C44.

Yeah names are not necessarily logical. At least Minwax named them after actual tree types I can recognize (and it would behoove them to do so, as wood stain is what they're known for).

About family memories... yeah My grandfather's Ford Galaxy 500 was a bright Caterpillar Yellow that made the car look like a New York taxi cab. The interior was milk chocolate brown. Like a giant chocolate covered banana combined with the Beatles' Yellow Submarine. We had a bright shaggy orange carpet in the living room. But hey, it was the 1970s. People were into various shades of avocado green and yellow spots - on their ties! What is a strange green-wood Formica counter top going to do to you?  Grin

« Last Edit: July 20, 2016, 08:27:41 am by J. Wilhelm » Logged
Hurricane Annie
Zeppelin Captain
*****
New Zealand New Zealand



« Reply #34 on: July 20, 2016, 09:35:54 am »

It can come off the walls and get you at night  - especially as it was not glued on properly . It was not suited to a girls bedroom  or anywhere .

The  2 things my parents had that were groovy and years head of their time,  both chosen by my late father . A pale green embossed wallpaper with Maori meetingg houses and tiki faces  along one wall .   Dad was given a large tapa cloth  by his Pacific Island work colleagues for his union assistance , my parents put it up against another wall for a time.  Not sure what happened to it but it would have been worth a bomb now.

 Every thing  is upside down and back to front in the Antipodes . Including the colour charts .  Now you know why my  silver grey became passion fruit smoothee colour - all through the house . Dream weaver  wove into  a purple haze
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selectedgrub
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« Reply #35 on: July 20, 2016, 09:52:12 am »

I like charcoal colour of your house.
I also like when they grey trim charcoal where you have the white.

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Hurricane Annie
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New Zealand New Zealand



« Reply #36 on: July 21, 2016, 12:32:14 am »

I like charcoal colour of your house.
I also like when they grey trim charcoal where you have the white.



 Thanks  Selecta. It is a striking scheme . It reminded me of the houses on the way to Kaiaua.  It's missing a green roof and flame trees .  Grey is underrated  as a house colour.

 There is none of that swimming in a vast  ocean of "tea " down here.   Who ever started that paint  trend should be dunked.
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