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Author Topic: Trains,Steampunk & the Goose  (Read 794 times)
Cmdr. Storm
Officer
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United States United States


« on: May 06, 2016, 10:50:03 am »

Hey There Folks,not too long ago, i Bought a CD of Music by the Artist C.W. McCall, and one of the Songs was about a Vehicle Called the Galloping Goose! The Goose was a Combination of a Train & a Car, it was Known to Trainmen as a Motor, i don't have Any Pics to Post, But if You Google Galloping Goose, You can See what it Looks like. I'm Wondering if Something like The Galloping Goose Might be Considered Steampunk Because of it's Looks? 
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Madasasteamfish
A clanger waiting to be dropped......
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Rogue Ætherlord
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United Kingdom United Kingdom


09madasafish
« Reply #1 on: May 06, 2016, 06:16:27 pm »

Here's some piccies for those lacking in google-fu





I'm sure something like this could be considered steampunk, but given diesel railmotors such as this (at least in Europe) only really started appearing post-WWI (when they were usually used as a cheap alternative to steam locos for little used branch lines and the like), IMHO they're more fitting of a 'dieselpunk' label than steampunk (especially in the context of Britain, given how cheap coal was compared to oil).
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James Harrison
Immortal
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England England


Bachelor of the Arts; Master of the Sciences


« Reply #2 on: May 06, 2016, 06:28:06 pm »

Ah; it's a railmotor type thing!  The ones that ran in Britain up to the 1940s were steam powered.  I've been on one. 







(It was frustratingly difficult to get any good photos of it). 

From what I remember, it was quite unlike any other type of train I've ridden on.  You got a sort of back-massage thing going on as the vibrations from the back-and-forth motion of the pistons were transferred into the carriage bodywork.  It was quite relaxing for a 1/2 mile ride but I imagine it would be rather different if presented with the notion of a long journey in it.   



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Persons intending to travel by open carriage should select a seat with their backs to the engine, by which means they will avoid the ashes emitted therefrom, that in travelling generally, but particularly through the tunnels, prove a great annoyance; the carriage farthest from the engine will in consequence be found the most desirable.
GCCC
Zeppelin Admiral
******
United States United States


« Reply #3 on: May 10, 2016, 06:05:42 pm »

Here's some piccies for those lacking in google-fu





I'm sure something like this could be considered steampunk, but given diesel railmotors such as this (at least in Europe) only really started appearing post-WWI (when they were usually used as a cheap alternative to steam locos for little used branch lines and the like), IMHO they're more fitting of a 'dieselpunk' label than steampunk (especially in the context of Britain, given how cheap coal was compared to oil).


Looking at these, I'd say they're Steampunkable, say, in your fiction or maker's shed (lookin' at you, Maets!).
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Madasasteamfish
A clanger waiting to be dropped......
Moderator
Rogue Ætherlord
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United Kingdom United Kingdom


09madasafish
« Reply #4 on: May 10, 2016, 07:43:05 pm »

Ah; it's a railmotor type thing!  The ones that ran in Britain up to the 1940s were steam powered.  I've been on one. 







(It was frustratingly difficult to get any good photos of it). 

From what I remember, it was quite unlike any other type of train I've ridden on.  You got a sort of back-massage thing going on as the vibrations from the back-and-forth motion of the pistons were transferred into the carriage bodywork.  It was quite relaxing for a 1/2 mile ride but I imagine it would be rather different if presented with the notion of a long journey in it.   



I managed to get a reasonably decent picture when I visited Didcot back in March which features the 'business end' so to speak and gives an idea of the layout of the vehicle (the passenger compartment is arranged along the lines of a tramcar with seats either side of an aile).


However, I believe there were some diesel railmotors produced during the interwar period more akin to 'the goose' whereby a bus body was mounted on a redundant wagon chassis but I can't recall the details of their use.
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James Harrison
Immortal
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England England


Bachelor of the Arts; Master of the Sciences


« Reply #5 on: May 10, 2016, 08:12:16 pm »

The light railways run by Colonel Stephens made fairly extensive use of diesel railcars in the 1920s/ 30s. 



(The Colonel Stephens railways were a group of so-called 'light railways' [basically meaning, railways built without an Act of Parliament and not having to completely comply with the Board of Trade regs- with the payoff that speeds, frequency of service and so on were restricted] that escaped the 1923 Grouping and then ran on a shoestring budget with an 'interesting' collection of motive power and rolling stock until they died off in the late 1930s/ 1940s). 
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Madasasteamfish
A clanger waiting to be dropped......
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Rogue Ætherlord
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United Kingdom United Kingdom


09madasafish
« Reply #6 on: May 10, 2016, 08:47:49 pm »

That's exactly the sort of thing I was talking about. I seem to recall reading somewhere that some member of the Landed gentry used something similar on a light railway they had built to connect their estate to the local village station, for the benefit of their workers (although I might be misremembering a 'might have been' feature of a layout in the Model Rail press based on Hassop).
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Athanor
Zeppelin Admiral
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Canada Canada


Keep them off-balance and brazen it out!


« Reply #7 on: May 12, 2016, 08:03:34 am »

There were several narrow gauge (15 inch, 18 inch and 2ft.) railways built by landowners in Britain to connect their estates to the nearest main line station; examples were the Duffield Bank, Eaton Hall and Sand Hutton railways.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Duffield_Bank_Railway
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Eaton_Hall_Railway
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sand_Hutton_Light_Railway

Athanor
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"Truly I say to you, he who seeks, shall find. And quite often, he shall wish he hadn't."

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chironex
Snr. Officer
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Australia Australia


The typing jellyfish monster


« Reply #8 on: May 13, 2016, 04:21:44 am »

The Pichi Richi Railway in South Australia was using this for some time:

And this is the Gulflander (Normanton-Croydon service):

Some other Queensland railway museums still have some of those of various models, too. Often used for vintage rail tours as they are nearly of the same vintage as most preserved Queensland steam locos anyway, only much cheaper to operate.
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