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Author Topic: Umpire Leg guard turned Steampunk Leg Brace  (Read 2243 times)
Cmdr. Storm
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« Reply #25 on: May 12, 2016, 06:02:09 am »

is there a Harbor Freight Store in Your Area? They might have What You're Looking for, if Not Check With a Welding Supply Shop and Ask them, or Check with an Auto Parts store. Hope This Helps.btw, Your Steampunk Item is Looking Superb,IMHO!
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Sir Farthington-Smythe
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« Reply #26 on: May 12, 2016, 08:51:52 pm »

is there a Harbor Freight Store in Your Area? They might have What You're Looking for, if Not Check With a Welding Supply Shop and Ask them, or Check with an Auto Parts store. Hope This Helps.btw, Your Steampunk Item is Looking Superb,IMHO!

Thank you Cmdr. Storm for your valuable advice!  Not sure why it never dawned on me to check with welding supply shops; after all, gauges are usually found in the welding section of the HW stores.  Either that or pneumatic tools section.  Located a welding supply shop that claims to carry parts, as they do repairs, so here's hoping they can help me out.

Re: hinges... Too many ideas have flooded my brain, it is hard to sort them all out.

I began stitching the knee plate to the leather, but thanks to a kink in my wire, it snapped while I was tightening.  I knew it was going to tough work, but sure am looking forward to completing the final stitch.

Here is a shot of what the stitching looks like.  You can probably see near the edge of the photo where the wire snapped.
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Drew P
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« Reply #27 on: May 13, 2016, 02:52:51 am »

To better fill the stiching holes, use stranded copper wire, plus, it's harder to break with using several strands at a time vs one.
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Sir Farthington-Smythe
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« Reply #28 on: May 15, 2016, 11:14:19 pm »

Well, I finally finished stitching on the knee plate.  It actually got easier as I went along and got near the end, as the holes in the plate and the leather began lining up much better.

Here it is:


To better fill the stiching holes, use stranded copper wire, plus, it's harder to break with using several strands at a time vs one.

I agree with the reasoning, however; in this particular case it would have been less practical.  While the holes look quite roomy, there was barely enough room for the single strand to fit through twice.  The other issue was with the material on the backing of the leather.  The holes through the leather had plenty of room, but it would have been harder to fit stranded copper wire through.  Here is the view from behind...


I keep thinking of features to add.  One idea I am mulling over is building a mini steam generator using a mini blower and an e-cig.  I would like to channel the vapours through the vents on the shin plate, and potentially rig it to emit a puff of vapour with each step, to simulate a release of pressure.
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Sir Farthington-Smythe
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« Reply #29 on: May 17, 2016, 10:23:31 pm »

Here is a sketch of the hinge I hope to make.  I designed it so that it snaps on the end of the braided hose.  I plan to use a shoulder bold as the hinge pin, secured in place with an acorn nut.  The nut will fit snugly into a recess.  In the hinge joints themselves, I have added recesses to hold fiber washers to prevent metal on metal seizing.  What're not in the sketch are the rivet holes.  I'm contemplating adding a nice Victorian style flourish (possibly a spade) to allow for three rivets on either side of the hinge.

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Sir Farthington-Smythe
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« Reply #30 on: May 19, 2016, 04:12:10 am »

Here is an isometric rendering from SketchUp demonstrating how the piston shall attach to the hinge.
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Professor J. Cogsworthy
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« Reply #31 on: May 20, 2016, 12:53:49 pm »

You could ruse small rivets ( brass tacks ) instead of wire to attach the part together....
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Sir Farthington-Smythe
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« Reply #32 on: June 01, 2016, 03:25:06 pm »

While out of town, I located a gauge identical to the one I had originally.  Since I am aware of the plastic parts, I shall forgo complete disassembly to replace the dial, and instead find a creative way to  cover the original dial with one of my own design without complete disassembly.  The farthest I can disassemble without breaking it is to remove the gauge from its housing, so I can at least recolour the housing.
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Sir Farthington-Smythe
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« Reply #33 on: June 02, 2016, 11:47:23 pm »

OK, so here is a mock up of my custom dial face for the gauge.

I value your opinions and am open to ideas for improvement.

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Cmdr. Storm
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« Reply #34 on: June 03, 2016, 03:33:18 am »

This Dial Face has a Classic Look to it. Well Done Smiley Smiley Smiley Smiley
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Drew P
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« Reply #35 on: June 03, 2016, 11:39:40 am »

I feel that the guage numerals should all be horizontal facing as most guages appear to be and not like a watch face.
Easier to be read in times of urgency. Wink
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Sir Farthington-Smythe
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« Reply #36 on: June 03, 2016, 10:32:48 pm »

I feel that the guage numerals should all be horizontal facing as most guages appear to be and not like a watch face.
Easier to be read in times of urgency. Wink


Fair point indeed.  I took your suggestion under advisement whilst updating the design.  Here is the most recent mock up...


As usual, I am still open to suggestions for improvement and value everyone's opinion and advice.
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Maets
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« Reply #37 on: June 04, 2016, 12:09:59 am »

Definitely like the second one.
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SeVeNeVeS
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« Reply #38 on: June 04, 2016, 08:49:40 am »

I agree No2 works for me better than the first.
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Sir Farthington-Smythe
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« Reply #39 on: June 06, 2016, 04:23:56 pm »

After painting and clear coating the pressure gauge housing, I decided to do a dry build (without the guts) to make sure the front ring and body would still fit together with the added thickness.  It came as no surprise that it was now impossible to install the front ring onto the main body, so I sanded away much of the paint from along the mating surface of the main body.  I was able to get the ring to sit on the main body, but could not push it all the way down, so I used a mallet to install it.  But wait!!!!!!  It's only a dry build!  The guts aren't inside yet, and if I needed a mallet to get the thing on, how was I to get it back off so I could fill it with the guts?  It took some creative thinking, but I did manage to remove the ring again.  I hadn't stripped off a wide enough band of paint.  At least now I know how much to strip off.  Just need to pick up a wire brush bit for my drill to make easier work of this.

Because the gauge is new, the brass of the valve stem does not quite match the antique brass finish of the gauge or the shin and knee plates, and the T-connect fitting.  I would like to age the gauge stem a bit so it has less contrast to the rest of the gauge.  I am familiar with some brass aging techniques, but am not sure which to use.  Do any of you have experience with aging brass?  I'm not sure whether simply to soak the stem in vinegar for a bit (if so, how long?), wrap it in a vinegar soaked cloth (again, how long?), or expose it to vinegar vapour (again, how long?).
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Sir Farthington-Smythe
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« Reply #40 on: June 25, 2016, 10:49:46 pm »

Finally got the custom dial face installed.  Can you find the seems?  It went on in two pieces.  I think it looks pretty good.


I was setting it up to get a picture of the gauge installed on the knee plate, when I had a little hindsight moment.  When I epoxied the 1/4" NPT plug onto the knee plate, I neglected to properly prep the plastic surface, as a result...

...the bond broke and the paint job was severely damaged.  I removed the paint chips from the plug, prepped the plastic surface by scoring hash marks into it, to provide a rough surface to which the epoxy can bond, and applied more epoxy.  Later comes touching up the paint job.  The epoxy bonded quite well to the brass, though.  Sadly, too; it meant I had to unstitch part of the brass wire holding the knee plate to the leather in order to access the other end of the plug, so I could remove the T-connect therefrom.  Oh well.  That's how these projects go sometimes.

At least the gauge is done.
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steiconi
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« Reply #41 on: June 27, 2016, 06:14:58 am »

I used to have a commercial solution to verdigris copper and brass; it had a strong ammonia scent.  The longer you left it on, the greener the metal got. 
So if I wanted to dull down one of those metals, I would probably try applying ammonia to a test piece for a short time, and rinsing when it got to the right color (anywhere from dull brown to bright aqua)
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Sir Farthington-Smythe
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« Reply #42 on: June 29, 2016, 03:44:08 am »

I used a 1/4 NPT short nipple as a test piece for the aging process.  In the image below are the results from soaking one end of the nipple in a salt & vinegar solution.  I wanted to be able to compare the saturated side with the unexposed side.  Oddly enough, the shiny new looking part was the side in the solution, and the oxidized part was above the solution, exposed to its fumes.  The salty vinegar seemed to protect the brass, while its fumes did the damage I wanted.  Unfortunately, I was unable to achieve the same results with the gauge stem itself, but by dipping it in the solution and exposing it to the air, rinse and repeat, it began to darken, but still not quite the effect I desired.

I used to have a commercial solution to verdigris copper and brass; it had a strong ammonia scent.  The longer you left it on, the greener the metal got. 
So if I wanted to dull down one of those metals, I would probably try applying ammonia to a test piece for a short time, and rinsing when it got to the right color (anywhere from dull brown to bright aqua)

Too true.  I have read about using ammonia for this purpose.  In some articles, people simply left their brass piece in their cat's litter box and let the ammonia of the critter's urine do the work.  That's a little, um, not what I plan to try.  Some people even suggested human urine, but, again, not for me.  I thank you kind lady for reminding me of the ammonia method.  Something to try, to be sure. With ammonia, not urine, of course.
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Maets
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« Reply #43 on: July 04, 2016, 09:40:43 pm »

I use vinegar all the time to CLEAN the brass and make it shiny. 

There are commercial brass darkening solutions sold at gun shops.
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Kevin C Cooper Esq
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« Reply #44 on: July 07, 2016, 04:03:50 pm »

I age my brass parts in a tupperware box with a small amount of household cleaning ammonia in the bottom, the brass parts sit on a platform so they're just exposed to the fumes. Check progress till you get the desired finish.
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Sir Farthington-Smythe
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« Reply #45 on: August 05, 2016, 02:36:09 am »

Sadly, I am out of funds for this project.  I will continue when things turn around. Hopefully it will be before October 31st.  Oh well, if not by then, at least Steampunk is not just for Halloween, thankfully.
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