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Author Topic: not exactly Steampunk  (Read 1100 times)
Professor J. Cogsworthy
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Aude Aliquid Dignum


« on: April 25, 2016, 01:09:41 pm »

but still cool as hell....

http://www.sportscardigest.com/edwardian-monsters-goodwood-2016-photos/8/
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No, no no, a thousand times no. Its pronounced - lah-BOHR-ah-tor-ee
Crescat Scientia
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Fabricator and temporally confused.


« Reply #1 on: April 25, 2016, 02:02:41 pm »



I would call Edwardian racing cars a fine example of real world near-steampunk.  Thank you for sharing. 
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Living on steam isn't easy.
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-- Old family saying
Hurricane Annie
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« Reply #2 on: April 30, 2016, 02:16:32 am »



 Fairly groovy
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RJBowman
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« Reply #3 on: May 02, 2016, 03:11:17 am »

This would be toward the end of the era of real-world technology that fits into a steampunk setting. Chitty Chitty Bang Bang is a steampunk car.
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RJBowman
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« Reply #4 on: May 02, 2016, 03:12:43 am »

I like this one:

The front of the car looks like an alien skull.
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Maets
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« Reply #5 on: May 05, 2016, 01:23:48 am »

Seems to work rather nicely with steampunk.
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RJBowman
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« Reply #6 on: May 05, 2016, 03:49:42 am »

People want to define steampunk to narrowly and divide of other stuff into genres like "dieselpunk" and "gearpunk". I say that if it has the look of roughly 100 to 200 years ago, it can be called steampunk, even if it runs on batteries or gasoline. Cars like these could fit quite nicely into a steampunk world.
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Hurricane Annie
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New Zealand New Zealand



« Reply #7 on: June 07, 2016, 05:09:33 pm »

People want to define steampunk to narrowly and divide of other stuff into genres like "dieselpunk" and "gearpunk". I say that if it has the look of roughly 100 to 200 years ago, it can be called steampunk, even if it runs on batteries or gasoline. Cars like these could fit quite nicely into a steampunk world.

It's like about joining in the spirit of things
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53Bash
Gunner
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United States United States



« Reply #8 on: June 07, 2016, 05:35:28 pm »



This actually plays really well into a post I mad in off-topic regarding the motorcycle I've been building.  My conclusion was that regardless of any steampunk detailing elements I might use (which aren't many, but I'd considered going heavily that direction) the fundamental design could not ever be steampunk.

The reason?  Suspension design.  If you look at these cars (and most motorcycles) The suspensions use engineering elements that Victorians knew how to make (maybe not as well or cheaply, but they were used in actual machinery).  Conversely, after WWII you have the introduction of high strength rod end bearings and ball joints, which allows for light weight double A arm suspensions (which is what my motorcycle uses) as seen on modern race cars (and hidden behind the wheels of many modern family cars).  Production of reliable spherical joints changes design options to allow new sorts of mechanical movement, which greatly impacts aesthetics.  

These cars "look old fashioned" to us because they don't have any of those "modern" types of mechanical movements, and base all motion off either revolution around a fixed axle, or motion of a flexing spring.  When you add in spherical joints, you get a third type of motion that IMO looks out of place in anything steampunk.
« Last Edit: June 08, 2016, 02:11:03 am by 53Bash » Logged

'Hidden Steampunk Name' : Sebastian Danger Wirefields
Crescat Scientia
Zeppelin Captain
*****
United States United States


Fabricator and temporally confused.


« Reply #9 on: October 05, 2016, 09:06:37 am »



This actually plays really well into a post I mad in off-topic regarding the motorcycle I've been building.  My conclusion was that regardless of any steampunk detailing elements I might use (which aren't many, but I'd considered going heavily that direction) the fundamental design could not ever be steampunk.

The reason?  Suspension design.  If you look at these cars (and most motorcycles) The suspensions use engineering elements that Victorians knew how to make (maybe not as well or cheaply, but they were used in actual machinery).  Conversely, after WWII you have the introduction of high strength rod end bearings and ball joints, which allows for light weight double A arm suspensions (which is what my motorcycle uses) as seen on modern race cars (and hidden behind the wheels of many modern family cars).  Production of reliable spherical joints changes design options to allow new sorts of mechanical movement, which greatly impacts aesthetics.  

These cars "look old fashioned" to us because they don't have any of those "modern" types of mechanical movements, and base all motion off either revolution around a fixed axle, or motion of a flexing spring.  When you add in spherical joints, you get a third type of motion that IMO looks out of place in anything steampunk.


Now that is interesting, and not a consideration I would have noticed.

I wonder if there are some good video or real life examples to help people visualize the differences.
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