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Author Topic: Rum Runners on the Frozen Detroit River  (Read 954 times)
RJBowman
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« on: April 10, 2016, 09:12:09 pm »



Photo from photo-essay type article:
http://www.onlyinyourstate.com/michigan/prohibition-mi/
Photo of alleged rum runner crossing the Detroit River on a winter day.

Background: Detriot is across the river from Windsor, Ontario. During prohibition, Windsor became home to distilleries, and much alchohol crossed the Detroit river and the Great Lakes on boats under cover of darkness. There were winters when the river froze and trucks were able to cross the ice, and legend has it that some trucks broke through the ice and are still on the bottom of the river today.
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Clym Angus
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« Reply #1 on: April 11, 2016, 05:54:17 pm »

"The impotence of legislation in this field was demonstrated when the Sale of Beer Act 1854 which restricted Sunday opening hours had to be repealed, following widespread rioting. In 1859 a prototype prohibition bill was overwhelmingly defeated in the House of Commons"

Sorry about this but I'm feeling quite teary eyed and patriotic for some strange reason....

    Rule Britannia!
    Britannia rule the waves
    Britons never, never, never shall be slaves!
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J. Wilhelm
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« Reply #2 on: April 12, 2016, 11:06:54 am »

"The impotence of legislation in this field was demonstrated when the Sale of Beer Act 1854 which restricted Sunday opening hours had to be repealed, following widespread rioting. In 1859 a prototype prohibition bill was overwhelmingly defeated in the House of Commons"

Sorry about this but I'm feeling quite teary eyed and patriotic for some strange reason....

    Rule Britannia!
    Britannia rule the waves
    Britons never, never, never shall be slaves!

What you're referring to is known as "Blue Law(s)."

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Blue_law

The idea of prohibiting sale of alcohol (but not limited to just alcohol) on religious grounds. In spite of the religious freedom in the US, the favouritism given to certain Protestant denominations in certain states (e.g. Baptist faith in Texas) has led to the passage of Blue Laws on a State by State basis. Surprisingly that went unchallenged by the Federal Govt. (typically by way of the US Federal Court system), even after prohibition ended.

I remember around 1976 my grandparents and I were on a trip, right here in the city where I am now, as we flew from Mexico City every summer and visited family in the US. We were buying food at a local supermarket to take back to the hotel, and this happened to be a Sunday.

I was trying to convince my grandparents to purchase a little die cast toy jet airplane at the supermarket. When we arrived at the cash register, the cashier told us that because of the Texas Blue Laws, she could not sell anything that was not food! She hurriedly snuck the airplane under a bag and charged us the amount promising not to tell her manager (back in the days when cash registers were only mechanical registers without bar codes). Thereafter we became very concious of Texas Blue laws.

By the 1980's the Blue laws had been amended and you could buy non-food items on Sunday, but I remember back in 1993, when I was (ironically) a cashier at the local supermarket, that we still had restrictions on the hours we could sell alcohol during the weekend. Sales were legal only during daytime, if I remember correctly.  Today you can buy anything you want any day of the week, but alcohol still can't be purchased after midnight (pubs will serve until 1 AM).

Sad thing is you can still see local legislatures in some states trying to pass reactionary laws today, mostly on religious grounds. Anything to reverse progress by say, 50 years at least, if not more. But I guess this is a topic for the Queer Geer thread, and in danger of becoming a political discussion.
« Last Edit: April 12, 2016, 11:15:00 am by J. Wilhelm » Logged

RJBowman
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« Reply #3 on: April 14, 2016, 01:24:12 am »

Indiana also had blue laws. No liquor or cars could be sold on Sunday.
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von Corax
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« Reply #4 on: May 03, 2016, 05:47:49 pm »

In Canada the Lord's Day Act was only struck down in 1985.

On the other hand, some of the wealthiest families in the Canadian Establishment became so thanks to U. S. Prohibition.
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Clym Angus
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« Reply #5 on: May 04, 2016, 03:18:56 pm »

Indiana also had blue laws. No liquor or cars could be sold on Sunday.

What's Satanic about selling a car on a Sunday? If God had a car (and lets be honest being omnipresent, chances are the supreme being probably has a pretty sweet garage) then, chances are on a "day of rest". What beats a good ride in the country? Top down, bit of AC/DC at a good but not imposing volume, sun shining that you put up there on day 1.

This doesn't seem too "war against the lord of all heaven" to me. Maybe I missed that particular passage in the good book. Maybe the people writing would have had something strong and turgid to say, if cars had been invented at that point. I would have thought that if it was that much of an issue (being time crossing omnipresent and all) then the big guy would have at least mentioned it in the ten. Thou shalt not listen to wicked tunes and drive thou mechanical contrivance upon my hallowed day of rest.

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J. Wilhelm
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« Reply #6 on: May 05, 2016, 04:01:09 am »

Indiana also had blue laws. No liquor or cars could be sold on Sunday.

What's Satanic about selling a car on a Sunday? If God had a car (and lets be honest being omnipresent, chances are the supreme being probably has a pretty sweet garage) then, chances are on a "day of rest". What beats a good ride in the country? Top down, bit of AC/DC at a good but not imposing volume, sun shining that you put up there on day 1.

This doesn't seem too "war against the lord of all heaven" to me. Maybe I missed that particular passage in the good book. Maybe the people writing would have had something strong and turgid to say, if cars had been invented at that point. I would have thought that if it was that much of an issue (being time crossing omnipresent and all) then the big guy would have at least mentioned it in the ten. Thou shalt not listen to wicked tunes and drive thou mechanical contrivance upon my hallowed day of rest.



I've got to educate myself on the subject because some denominations of Christian and Jewish faith do follow some sort of transportation curfew around the Sabbath/Sunday.  I just don't understand the theory, to be honest.  It's certainly not universal and very subjective IMHO. Also, why forbid anything except food? The alcohol prohibition is also highly subjective as wine is supposed to be part of the original Passover Seder meal which is also related to Christ's Last Supper. So all that "no alcohol" rule makes no sense. That is from my "Catholic Light" upbringing (Episcopal: only half the guilt, just as satisfying!  Grin )

All I know is that when I went to the Lourdes' grotto, that congregation of German Catholic nuns at a local bar in town were having a ball singing German folk songs and drinking pints of beer - I know I saw it with me two eyes, yes I did.  So the "dangers of alcohol" are really subjective and not specified in any ancient holy book that I know of.
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RJBowman
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« Reply #7 on: May 05, 2016, 04:57:00 am »

The Christian Temperance movement was strictly Protestant.
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J. Wilhelm
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« Reply #8 on: May 05, 2016, 05:13:31 am »

The Christian Temperance movement was strictly Protestant.

Correct, but it's even more restrictive than that. I have attended Lutheran communion on Sundays - because of my Uncle's in-law's German family in Texas. Wine is not a problem.  On the other hand some of my family - late 19th. C Italian migrants in Northern Mexico, converted to the Baptist faith.  They do have a problem with alcohol.
« Last Edit: May 05, 2016, 05:19:05 am by J. Wilhelm » Logged
J. Wilhelm
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« Reply #9 on: May 05, 2016, 05:16:22 am »

My apologies. I'm not trying to make this a discussion on religion.  Clearly a violation of forum's policies --but prohibition as you say is faith based... perhaps just leave it at that...
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RJBowman
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« Reply #10 on: May 05, 2016, 02:11:45 pm »

One other factor that isn't often discussed; the Christian Temperance movement was pushed hardest by women; without the 19th amendment, there probably would not have been prohibition.
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