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Author Topic: Traditional Music From Around The World  (Read 868 times)
chicar
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« on: April 07, 2016, 03:36:08 pm »

Lets dive a bit in the domain of multiculturalism and show us your favorite piece of traditional music from across the world.


Mine:

Dodo Ti-Pitit' Manman, a creole lullaby who is as beautifull as it is terrifying since , in the tradition of songs such as El Cucuy, the song downright threat the child to be eaten by a crab if he doesn't go to sleep :
www.youtube.com/watch?v=DoDDMcBGIh4


I also quite love this version in nahuatl of the mexican song La Llorona:
www.youtube.com/watch?v=Jh2ibtFDObU

« Last Edit: April 07, 2016, 05:41:38 pm by chicar » Logged

The word pagan came from paganus , who mean peasant . Its was a way to significate than christianism was the religion of the elite and paganism the one of the savage worker class.

''Trickster shows us how we trick OURSELVES. Her rampant curiosity backfires, but, then, something NEW is discovered (though usually not what She expected)! This is where creativity comes from—experiment, do something different, maybe even something forbidden, and voila! A breakthrough occurs! Ha! Ha! We are released! The world is created anew! Do something backwards, break your own traditions, the barrier breaks; destroy the world as you know it, let the new in.''
Extract of the Dreamflesh article ''Path of The Sacred Clown''
Caledonian
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the dragon's called Salmacis


« Reply #1 on: April 07, 2016, 03:48:13 pm »

well.... this was one of my grans favourites. it's a childrens song.
Hop Marjanneke, stroop in het kanneke - Kinderliedjes van vroeger


but most famous dutch traditional music would probably be the 'draaiorgel'
Carl Frei draaiorgel 'Het Stijvebeeldekassie' speelt Prins Bernard Mars

Draaiorgel De Hindenburg te Zaltbommel


and... SAILORS MUSIC
Kaap'ren varen mannen met baarden

PATER MOESKROEN met HET ZEEMANSLIED


and...whatever this qualifies as.

Acda en de Munnik - De stad Amsterdam

Dutch Folk Music - Dutch Windmills


I personally prefer scottish and irish traditional music.
« Last Edit: April 07, 2016, 03:57:16 pm by Caledonian » Logged

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morozow
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« Reply #2 on: April 07, 2016, 04:06:52 pm »

Russian lullaby

« Last Edit: April 07, 2016, 04:33:00 pm by morozow » Logged

Sorry for the errors, rudeness and stupidity. It's not me, this online translator. Really convenient?
Caledonian
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the dragon's called Salmacis


« Reply #3 on: April 07, 2016, 04:26:40 pm »

Keallepoaten - Fryske Ferskes/Friese Liedjes


let's not forget out northern part with their strange language.
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J. Wilhelm
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« Reply #4 on: April 08, 2016, 07:31:09 am »

Moving a bit outside of lullabies and children's folk songs, there is a plethora of music examples. Mr Chicar having mentioned a version of "La Llorona" in Nahuatl, I'm hard pressed to pick one.

Just a quick google, and I stumble on a musical genre and style of dance, named "Huapango" (Oo-ah-pan-goh), usually coming from (but not limited to) Mexico's Oriental Sierra Madre mountain range, along a large coastal mountain zone known as "La Huasteca" (Oo-ah-steh-cah).


I guess this would be the Mexican equivalent of the Appalachian Mountains region in the US. So mayhaps this would be the rough analogue of the Bluegrass musical genre

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/La_Huasteca
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Huapango

In the example below Mexican pop artist Yuri, dresses up in traditional garb from the eastern state of Veracruz, and sings a huapango, "El Cascabel" (The Rattle). The use of harp and all-string ensembles from the eastern coastal regions produce a mesmerizing sound...



A more traditional presentation of the same song above, but in concert format, and original instruments, showing the full use of strings in the Huapango:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=eDZFzYoPI-U

And, even a more traditional presentation, showing the dance that goes along with the music. Huapango, "El Caballito" (The Little Horse). You can clearly see the Native American influences in dress as well.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Pbb5FJtWmzM

Later, in the 20th. C, a few classical composers around the globe, began to "translate" their own national folkloric songs into the Classical Genre, perhaps following Aaron Copeland's lead after the success of his "El Salón México" (1936), based on Mexican music and "Appalachian Spring (1944)," which was based on American folk songs.

Famously, classical composer and conductor J. P. Moncayo, wrote the classical piece, simply titled "Huapango" in 1941, which I present below

Mexican conductor Carlos M. Prieto, with the Frankfurt Philharmonic Orchestra

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=5HAmrz3-ehI

Finally, there is a song that many Americans know from a 1959 Rock and Roll adaptation by Ritchie Valens, and probably associate with a 1987 movie starring Lou Diamond Philips.. Do you recognize this song?

(Yes, the dancing couple tie a knot on the floor with their feet while dancing...)

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=nlhnMtL618M


~ ~ ~
Edited for historical accuracy
« Last Edit: December 19, 2016, 07:07:55 am by J. Wilhelm » Logged

Caledonian
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the dragon's called Salmacis


« Reply #5 on: April 10, 2016, 12:49:41 pm »

someone interested in a shanty?
Ancora - Vrij als de wind (officiële videoclip) (Embedding disabled, limit reached)
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« Reply #6 on: April 11, 2016, 07:45:01 am »

Having written about folk songs turned into symphonic pieces, I probably shouldn't neglect mentioning Aaron Copland, and American folk song...

Aaron Copland was an American composer,  born in 1900, who studied music in the US as a teenager and later in Paris as a young adult in the late 1910s early 1920s, and in the 1930s made a living writing scores for theatrical plays and ballets. He also had ties with the political left and socialist groups in the US, who had made inroads into various  in the fine arts, especially after 1939, when socialists around the globe decided to present a "united front" against Fascist atrocities in the Spanish Civil War.  Ironically, one of those artistic movements influencing Copland, was the German concept of Gebrauchsmusik, or "music with purpose," as a type of nationalistic ideal for music. Naturally one source for national identity is folk songs,  which he began to fold into classical music scores.

Copland traveled around the world,  and in doing so he began to pay attention to regional music, and incorporated it into classical music as he had done in the United States.  One of those "regionally" inspired pieces was his 1936 composition, "El Salón México" which incorporated 4 Mexican folk songs, out of which "El Palo Verde" (The Green Stick) appears three times in the musical piece in "tone poem" format (ie in a single movement shifting several times in style)

Now, I have to warn you that "El Palo Verde" is very "rural," shall we say?  Roll Eyes  And a small town "oompa-band"  piece which is rather hard on the ears  Grin  It's a bit of an acquired taste (certainly not my cup of tea), and I much rather prefer Copland's pre-digested interpretation  Grin  Honestly,  I have to listen to El Salón México again to see if by chance I can recognize El Palo Verde within it (maybe one of you has a better ear than I have)  Undecided

El Palo Verde (folk song):   Tongue
https://youtube.com/watch?v=uTs3HTdSU_E

Jesus! Brave man,  that Copland,  eh?   Grin The Salón México is much easier to listen to.  El Salón México is named after a popular working class dance hall in Mexico City.  The musical piece has 3 recognizable styles, which are meant to reflect the marked social class divisions in that country at the time. He got the idea of three types when it was explained to him that the dance hall had been divided into three areas,  one for affluent well-dressed people, one for working class poorly dressed people, and one for poor people who could not even afford shoes! As legend goes, when visiting the dance hall, he read a sign which warned patrons to refrain from throwing cigarette butts onto the floor, to prevent shoeless ladies from burning their feet!!  With social justice in mind, Copland chose to represent wealthy people with dull boring and disorganized sounds, while he represented the poor and working class people with the brighter more vibrant and rich sounds. Music as political pulpit.

El Salón México by Copland
https://youtube.com/watch?v=WoILPBDsfvI

In 1942, Copland was commissioned by Martha Graham and Elizabeth Sprague Coolidge to write a ballet "with an American theme." Copland in this case incorporated the Shaker hymn "Simple Gifts". The old American Shaker/Christian hymn "Simple Gifts," extolled humility as a virtue for religious followers. The hymn was composed in 1848 by a Shaker elder (church leader), Joseph Brackett, for his settlement in the town of Gorham, in the state of Maine

Simple Gifts (Traditional Shaker Hymn)
https://youtube.com/watch?v=CLAnuG1340g

When he released his ballet adaptation, Copland named the piece "Ballet for Martha." Thus, contrary to popular belief, the song was not written about the Appalachian mountains, primarily because the title of the song was changed years after the ballet debuted, from a poem by Hart Crane, "The Dance." Nevertheless the "Simple Gifts" tune is extremely easy to find in Appalachian Spring:

Appalachian Spring
(tune to 23 min 56 sec. and 34 min 17 sec into the video to hear the Simple Gifts Hymn)
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=bMaAe2aH6pw

~ ~ ~
Edited for typos
« Last Edit: April 11, 2016, 10:23:49 am by J. Wilhelm » Logged
morozow
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« Reply #7 on: April 11, 2016, 04:42:53 pm »

In addition folk songs of the Cossacks of the Russian Empire was influenced by Russian and Ukrainian folk songs and thoughts, the North Caucasian music, and original works of Russian composers.

The most famous Cossack songs are "Oh, not evening", "Ljubo, brothers, Ljubo", "Not for me, come spring, You have deceived me" and "EUSA you eUSA" (there really funny the translator translated. there is about U.S. nothing. There "Ойся / Oise" nickname warlike hill tribe, which was protected by Cossacks).

Popular tracks and now. They are performed by large ensembles in public concerts. Individual artists, different genres and styles. Ordinary people sing them at the feasts.

Кубанский казачий хор - Ти ж мене підманула (Embedding disabled, limit reached)

На горе стоял Шамиль (Ойся, ты ойся!) - legendado PT-BR e RU (Embedding disabled, limit reached)

Ой то не вечер, то не вечер (Embedding disabled, limit reached)

Любо братцы , любо ... (Embedding disabled, limit reached)

Не для меня Putin Medvedev Хор Сретенского монастыря Ne Dlia Menia Russian Cossacks' Song Superb (Embedding disabled, limit reached)

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MWBailey
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rtafStElmo
« Reply #8 on: April 20, 2016, 05:04:19 am »

well.... this was one of my grans favourites. it's a childrens song.
Hop Marjanneke, stroop in het kanneke - Kinderliedjes van vroeger

but most famous dutch traditional music would probably be the 'draaiorgel'
Carl Frei draaiorgel 'Het Stijvebeeldekassie' speelt Prins Bernard Mars
Draaiorgel De Hindenburg te Zaltbommel

and... SAILORS MUSIC
Kaap'ren varen mannen met baarden
PATER MOESKROEN met HET ZEEMANSLIED





and...whatever this qualifies as.

Acda en de Munnik - De stad Amsterdam
Dutch Folk Music - Dutch Windmills

I personally prefer scottish and irish traditional music.





In all of this, I keep catching strains similar to the Boermusieck that the concertina band I belong to plays a lot of (one of our members, and our best concertinist, is of South African origin; the Boer settlers were of mainly Dutch origin).

One of our favorites and always a crowd pleaser at Potjie festivals, the Turfloop Wals
https://youtu.be/vVY6h78EF_I?list=PL_HWdYp7CRt_4OMuYQX1I1IQmIHRVD5PJ

Boermusieck tends to heavily favor the concertina (often but not always the paired-reed 20-button type) as the solo instrument, at least in the traditional sense. A somewhat less concertina-centric version of Dagbreek Toe Vastrap than we usually play, and less so than I usually encounter in soundfiles from fellow enthusiasts (but the only one I could find on Youtube at the moment for some reason) is this one:
https://youtu.be/lGLnJZ6A-HQ


Sadly, I am not yet competent enough to feel comfortable posting a vid of myself playing such tunes Embarrassed Wink

I also love Irish and other Celtic types of music (Silly Wizard, the Chieftains, and Altan are three  of my favorite bands) as well as American Old Time and Bluegrass. That bunch is all interconnected in various ways, and the concertina fits in there too; it was one of the instruments the pioneers and wagon train people carried with them into the wilderness - and it gets played in Celtic music as well.

https://youtu.be/cIseNLGKaY4

https://youtu.be/Mw85PqjTGBw

https://youtu.be/mpkrr0-qut4

https://youtu.be/rcb3JQwsdIg

https://youtu.be/9KzOyCwvQ9o

https://youtu.be/WlMfRlvysRI

https://youtu.be/wFZ4FEztR2g

« Last Edit: April 20, 2016, 05:48:32 am by MWBailey » Logged

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« Reply #9 on: April 20, 2016, 10:48:01 am »

We had touched on the Sami people in another thread (The "Longhouse" in Meta Clubs, I believe).

Not historically traditional, but rather lovely modern melodies, where the style is inspired from traditional Sami yoiks and songs:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=rN26PN7oLgY

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=CyA64m_p3PY

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=46WW3D5a_TU

Actual traditional song:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Grd4Bw84_gc

Yoiks remind me so much on Native American and Inuit song, though... I find it a very interesting analogy. A historical connection perhaps?
« Last Edit: April 20, 2016, 11:20:27 am by J. Wilhelm » Logged
Caledonian
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the dragon's called Salmacis


« Reply #10 on: April 21, 2016, 03:17:47 pm »

well.... this was one of my grans favourites. it's a childrens song.
Hop Marjanneke, stroop in het kanneke - Kinderliedjes van vroeger

but most famous dutch traditional music would probably be the 'draaiorgel'
Carl Frei draaiorgel 'Het Stijvebeeldekassie' speelt Prins Bernard Mars
Draaiorgel De Hindenburg te Zaltbommel

and... SAILORS MUSIC
Kaap'ren varen mannen met baarden
PATER MOESKROEN met HET ZEEMANSLIED





and...whatever this qualifies as.

Acda en de Munnik - De stad Amsterdam
Dutch Folk Music - Dutch Windmills

I personally prefer scottish and irish traditional music.





In all of this, I keep catching strains similar to the Boermusieck that the concertina band I belong to plays a lot of (one of our members, and our best concertinist, is of South African origin; the Boer settlers were of mainly Dutch origin).

One of our favorites and always a crowd pleaser at Potjie festivals, the Turfloop Wals
https://youtu.be/vVY6h78EF_I?list=PL_HWdYp7CRt_4OMuYQX1I1IQmIHRVD5PJ

Boermusieck tends to heavily favor the concertina (often but not always the paired-reed 20-button type) as the solo instrument, at least in the traditional sense. A somewhat less concertina-centric version of Dagbreek Toe Vastrap than we usually play, and less so than I usually encounter in soundfiles from fellow enthusiasts (but the only one I could find on Youtube at the moment for some reason) is this one:
https://youtu.be/lGLnJZ6A-HQ


Sadly, I am not yet competent enough to feel comfortable posting a vid of myself playing such tunes Embarrassed Wink

I also love Irish and other Celtic types of music (Silly Wizard, the Chieftains, and Altan are three  of my favorite bands) as well as American Old Time and Bluegrass. That bunch is all interconnected in various ways, and the concertina fits in there too; it was one of the instruments the pioneers and wagon train people carried with them into the wilderness - and it gets played in Celtic music as well.

https://youtu.be/cIseNLGKaY4

https://youtu.be/Mw85PqjTGBw

https://youtu.be/mpkrr0-qut4

https://youtu.be/rcb3JQwsdIg

https://youtu.be/9KzOyCwvQ9o

https://youtu.be/WlMfRlvysRI

https://youtu.be/wFZ4FEztR2g



none of the boermusieck is available for some reason.
I'm familiar with those celtic bands, though, and Silly wizard is one of my favourites.

here is a bunch of the bands I listen to a lot (Filtering out the folk punk)
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=uOoaNi4xvv0

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=X2lmSbQMM2Y

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=vk39DYvDRFM

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=7Pmr3raVOvQ

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Z6dQ7ZNOqkY


and here's some dutch version of Molly Malone
Molly Malone - kokkels en mossels (Embedding disabled, limit reached)
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MWBailey
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rtafStElmo
« Reply #11 on: April 21, 2016, 09:09:11 pm »


none of the boermusieck is available for some reason.





Coming through just fine for me, Though I'll add that I initially had to search for the tunes specifically (speaking in terms of about 2 to 4 years ago) when i was learning them for the first time. Not sure why people in some areas have to do that. You could try that dodge and see if it works.
 
Here's a slightly different link for Turfloop Wals
https://youtu.be/aGQEnz6K9V0

And a tune similar to Soutpansburg Settees
https://youtu.be/zeMfpcAkXA0

The "Settees" tunes are basically Schottisches, which might be why one tends to sound very similar to another.

If the above links don't work for you, I'm not sure what else to suggest.


« Last Edit: April 21, 2016, 09:34:21 pm by MWBailey » Logged
MWBailey
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"This is the sort of thing no-one ever believes"

rtafStElmo
« Reply #12 on: April 21, 2016, 11:02:46 pm »

OR... Alternatively, you could try looking up Henning De Lange on Facebook. He usually posts Boermusieck vids all over the place there.
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Cloque
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« Reply #13 on: April 22, 2016, 12:48:53 pm »

https://youtu.be/eafZXGNsvTc
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morozow
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« Reply #14 on: April 22, 2016, 12:57:43 pm »

https://youtu.be/pcjBicTfFY0
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Hurricane Annie
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« Reply #15 on: April 30, 2016, 02:28:15 am »


 Anything  with a toorallie toorallie aye will do  for a  Gaelic tale

 Though  It always comes back to this

 Whiskey in the jar  - Metallica version.   

Metallica - Whiskey In The Jar [Official Music Video] (Embedding disabled, limit reached)
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selectedgrub
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« Reply #16 on: April 30, 2016, 06:19:20 am »

Yes.
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Caledonian
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the dragon's called Salmacis


« Reply #17 on: May 01, 2016, 12:23:22 pm »


 Anything  with a toorallie toorallie aye will do  for a  Gaelic tale

 Though  It always comes back to this

 Whiskey in the jar  - Metallica version.   

Metallica - Whiskey In The Jar [Official Music Video]



I've collected a playlist of all the whiskey in the jar versions i could find. My metalhead friend and me agree
It's by far not the best version of whiskey in the jar, and by far not the best metallica song either
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morozow
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« Reply #18 on: May 03, 2016, 09:50:47 pm »

Пасха Христова 2014 (Embedding disabled, limit reached)
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MWBailey
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"This is the sort of thing no-one ever believes"

rtafStElmo
« Reply #19 on: May 05, 2016, 05:11:25 pm »

How about some Sacred Harp...

https://youtu.be/6S0TbZJQCBI

https://youtu.be/baFhSUaX00k

https://youtu.be/s-UiHg_uHd0

https://youtu.be/rgnpJiMHJfE?list=PLnR8GkOAdWhE7294Wyn_f_9wBmIENL418



 Anything  with a toorallie toorallie aye will do  for a  Gaelic tale

 Though  It always comes back to this

 Whiskey in the jar  - Metallica version.   

Metallica - Whiskey In The Jar [Official Music Video]



I've collected a playlist of all the whiskey in the jar versions i could find. My metalhead friend and me agree
It's by far not the best version of whiskey in the jar, and by far not the best metallica song either




As for Whiskey in the Jar,

https://youtu.be/hlWTASnnft4

'Nuff said?
« Last Edit: May 05, 2016, 05:16:55 pm by MWBailey » Logged
Hurricane Annie
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« Reply #20 on: May 09, 2016, 09:21:25 pm »



 with all respect MWBailey , there is no food fight or permanent markers in  the Dubliners version.  It is the only decent piece of music that Metallica  have.

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Caledonian
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the dragon's called Salmacis


« Reply #21 on: May 10, 2016, 11:03:14 am »

tss. here's 1 hour 45 of whiskey in the Jar

https://play.spotify.com/user/berendhofman/playlist/2KqCjdNboswgelFL2BNocf?play=true&utm_source=open.spotify.com&utm_medium=open&play=true
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Caledonian
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the dragon's called Salmacis


« Reply #22 on: May 14, 2016, 01:14:22 pm »

http://youtu.be/nZcWg1DfanQ

En de wielen van de fiets van Piet van Pa, zijn zojuist gepasseerd.
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