The Steampunk Forum at Brass Goggles
December 18, 2017, 09:19:29 pm *
Welcome, Guest. Please login or register.
Did you miss your activation email?

Login with username, password and session length
News: Support BrassGoggles! Donate once or $3/mo.
 See details here.
 
   Home   Blog Help Rules Login Register  
Pages: [1]   Go Down
  Print  
Author Topic: Protecting Steel without paint  (Read 617 times)
Kaydance Heggarty
Deck Hand
*
United Kingdom United Kingdom



« on: March 18, 2016, 07:35:53 pm »

Hope this is ok to post here but I'm hoping for some advice please.  I've got an old steel medical cabinet which I've had to strip back to the raw steel to remove the numerous ugly coats of paint it's received over the years.  Having got it back to bare steel it looks absolutely gorgeous but it's already getting small corrosion spots on it.  Anyone got any good suggestions re what I can seal it/protect it with please?  I've heard that wax can be good but how long would it last and what's the best one to use???  Thanks to anyone who can help.
Logged

Of tea:  So refined a stimulant will always be the favourite of the intellectual..... (Thomas De Quincy)
Hektor Plasm
Zeppelin Captain
*****
United Kingdom United Kingdom


All-Round Oddfellow.


WWW
« Reply #1 on: March 18, 2016, 07:58:08 pm »

I have heard that wax does a good job, and there are noxious unguents such as gun black/blue that can be applied cold, though I have no experience of these myself. I would hope that our Master Narsil will be able to help, he is the chap you really need for matters metal.
(Or one of them, anyway  Smiley )

HP
Logged

"all die! o, the embarrassment."
H Plasm Esq. ICUE    Avatar by and with kind permission of Dr Geof. Ta!!

Some musings:-
http://hektorplasm.blogspot.co.uk/
Joseph-Thornton
Deck Hand
*
United States United States



« Reply #2 on: March 18, 2016, 08:05:05 pm »

I'm no expert but I was a welder in a previous career path.

It sounds like you are talking about carbon steel (iron) and not stainless steel. A Google search tells me it doesn't really work. There are some clear coats you can use. But often moisture still (steel teehee) finds it's way under and can begin rusting (oxidation) even under the clear coat. One recommendation if autobody clear coat for the longest results. Most claim that it really just isn't a good idea for the metal.

But anyway here is one article on doing it anyway. http://www.instructables.com/id/Preserve-the-Beauty-of-Raw-or-Rusted-Steel-Iron-/ 
Logged

Drew P
Zeppelin Admiral
******
United States United States


« Reply #3 on: March 19, 2016, 02:07:50 am »

Look up Renaissance Wax, but remember, prep is the most important part.

Oh, and show us that cabinet!
Logged

Never ask 'Why?'
Always ask 'Why not!?'
Keith_Beef
Snr. Officer
****
France France


« Reply #4 on: March 19, 2016, 09:22:44 am »

Look up Renaissance Wax, but remember, prep is the most important part.

Oh, and show us that cabinet!

Another vote for Ren Wax.

Make sure you remove all rust spots and completely de-grease the metal. Try to work in a dry, warm place, about 20°C, and give the cabinet and pot of wax time to get up to that temperature.

Call in at a gun shop, and ask for advice about corrosion inhibitors… I seem to remember discussion on another board about some kind of rag or sachet of granules that was supposed to reduce rusting of stored metal. This might be useful for protecting the inside surfaces of your cabinet.
Logged

--
Keith
Drew P
Zeppelin Admiral
******
United States United States


« Reply #5 on: March 19, 2016, 02:34:02 pm »

Silica gel packets, like the ones that come with new shoes and some other items, work great to remove humidity from very small areas.
Logged
Maets
Immortal
**
United States United States

Gravatar

Airship Builder


WWW
« Reply #6 on: March 19, 2016, 09:17:59 pm »

I use clear gloss lacquer for protecting steel all the time.  A good heavy coat will last forever indoors.  Sun is the worse as it destroys any coating over time and then moisture takes over and you have rust.  Valspar makes a very good product that comes in spray cans.

Once you put wax on something, nothing else will ever work as it won't stick.

Linseed oil is also frequently used to protect steel, but lacquer is easier.

Lacquer is also easily touched up at anytime which can be a big advantage.
Logged

Drew P
Zeppelin Admiral
******
United States United States


« Reply #7 on: March 20, 2016, 03:18:09 pm »

In case you do use a wax, 3M wax degreaser (or PPG dx330, Prep Sol, etc.) and then a Metal Prep solution should be plenty to thoroughly clean the metal of any wax and oils.  A lot of auto builders use this stuff with success before painting, etc.
« Last Edit: March 21, 2016, 03:56:56 am by Drew P » Logged
Dr.B.Goodall
Gunner
**
United Kingdom United Kingdom

Be Good All! ;)


« Reply #8 on: March 20, 2016, 08:42:46 pm »

I'm with Maets on the clear lacquer method, and as Drew P said - "...prep is the most important part".

CAUTION: Working with alcohol de-greasing agents and spray paints / lacquers is harmful to your health (as well as highly flammable).  Please ensure you use the correct type of Fumes Mask (not a dust mask - those don't help at all).  Also ensure there are no sources of naked flame, excessive heat or potential sparks near where your are working.

If you want to use clear lacquer, you have to fully de-grease the surfaces.  You'll need to wear latex / latex free gloves (powder free) and use a decent alcohol like isopropanol (methylated spirits - preferably the clear stuff - also works), as even the "oil" from your skin can give rise to corrosion over time.  Basically, wipe the surfaces with lint-free cloth soaked in the alcohol, changing the cloth for new stuff regularly.  Once dry (won't take long in a warm-ish environment), you can then spray on the clear lacquer.  If you have access to a moisture-free compressed air source, a quick blow over all the surfaces should get rid of any remaining alcohol (especially in the recesses) - thus speeding up the drying process.

Alternatively, if the cabinet is not too big, and you can strip it down to just the metal frame, you could get it electroplated.  The upside is a corrosion free finish - but a light amount of abrasion (i.e. when cleaning) could wear away the electroplated coating over time.

Do you have any pictures of the cabinet? (with something to give an idea as to the size of it, like a baseball / tennis ball).
Logged

"People call me a "Doctor", but only for my skills.  I know nothing of healing the flesh.  Metal, steam, and what I discover in the wastelands are the tools and techniques for my creations in the new world." - Dr.B.Goodall, Wasteland Explorer
Pages: [1]   Go Up
  Print  
 
Jump to:  

Powered by MySQL Powered by PHP Powered by SMF 1.1.20 | SMF © 2013, Simple Machines Valid XHTML 1.0! Valid CSS!
Page created in 0.123 seconds with 15 queries.