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Author Topic: Wrist Compass  (Read 638 times)
Bines
Gunner
**
United States United States



« on: March 12, 2016, 10:25:20 pm »

Wristwatches existed during the 1800s, but were mainly worn by women. Men typically carried pocket watches. This is a functional wrist compass I made.



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Hektor Plasm
Zeppelin Captain
*****
United Kingdom United Kingdom


All-Round Oddfellow.


WWW
« Reply #1 on: March 12, 2016, 10:29:53 pm »

That's nice and straightforward. I like it!

HP
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"all die! o, the embarrassment."
H Plasm Esq. ICUE    Avatar by and with kind permission of Dr Geof. Ta!!

Some musings:-
http://hektorplasm.blogspot.co.uk/
selectedgrub
Guest
« Reply #2 on: March 12, 2016, 11:27:32 pm »

Great job, well done.
Thanks for sharing.
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Bines
Gunner
**
United States United States



« Reply #3 on: March 13, 2016, 04:16:31 am »

Thanks. I strive for tastefully understated.
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Krel
Deck Hand
*
United States United States


« Reply #4 on: March 13, 2016, 07:20:40 am »

Wristwatches existed during the 1800s, but were mainly worn by women. Men typically carried pocket watches.

Years ago I watched a program on watches., I believe it was the History Channel.  Like you said, wristwatches were available in the 1800s, but men preferred pocket watches, what changed that was World War  I.  In a combat situation using a pocket watch could be a liability.  The demand for wristwatches was so great, that watch makers couldn't meet the demand.  So what they started doing was soldering lugs on pocket watches to accommodate the wrist strap.  They also rotated the watch face, so the crown wouldn't interfere with the strap.   It made for a large, but serviceable wristwatch.

The watch in the movie "Pulp Fiction" is a converted pocket watch.

David.
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Miranda.T
Zeppelin Captain
*****
United Kingdom United Kingdom



« Reply #5 on: March 13, 2016, 12:10:27 pm »

Wristwatches existed during the 1800s, but were mainly worn by women. Men typically carried pocket watches. This is a functional wrist compass I made.






Very nicely executed. How does it do up - buckle or ties?

Wristwatches existed during the 1800s, but were mainly worn by women. Men typically carried pocket watches.


Years ago I watched a program on watches., I believe it was the History Channel.  Like you said, wristwatches were available in the 1800s, but men preferred pocket watches, what changed that was World War  I.  In a combat situation using a pocket watch could be a liability.  The demand for wristwatches was so great, that watch makers couldn't meet the demand.  So what they started doing was soldering lugs on pocket watches to accommodate the wrist strap.  They also rotated the watch face, so the crown wouldn't interfere with the strap.   It made for a large, but serviceable wristwatch.

The watch in the movie "Pulp Fiction" is a converted pocket watch.

David.


Interesting information, and the bit about converting a pocket watch to a wrist watch sounds like a whole new project.

Yours,
Miranda.
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Bines
Gunner
**
United States United States



« Reply #6 on: March 13, 2016, 02:56:39 pm »

Snaps. The band is a kit from Hobby Lobby that comes with the black strap with snaps and lace holes already punched and the ox blood leather lace. It can be laced up several different ways. The compass, the gear it sits on and the waxed twine that holds it in place are also Hobby Lobby items.
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