The Steampunk Forum at Brass Goggles
October 20, 2017, 12:59:19 am *
Welcome, Guest. Please login or register.
Did you miss your activation email?

Login with username, password and session length
News: Brassgoggles.co.uk - The Lighter Side Of Steampunk, follow @brasstech for forum technical problems & updates.
 
   Home   Blog Help Rules Login Register  
Pages: [1]   Go Down
  Print  
Author Topic: 19TH Century Baby Names  (Read 666 times)
Maets
Immortal
**
United States United States

Gravatar

Airship Builder


WWW
« on: March 08, 2016, 02:43:03 am »

List of some common names from the 1800s.

http://www.huffingtonpost.com/entry/awesomely-unique-baby-names-from-the-19th-century_us_56d9db90e4b0ffe6f8e94615?cps=gravity_2444_-4997104258607737036

Quote
Records on baby names only started to be tabulated in the U.S. in 1880, and so getting an accurate read on what babies were named before that has been difficult at best. But now a researcher named Douglas Galbi has compiled lists of baby names drawn from census records of the early 19th century. Nameberry combed through Galbi's data on baby names from 1800 to 1850 in search of trends, patterns, and vintage baby names that go way beyond the expected John, Mary, Elizabeth and James.

Biblical Names

Religious names, particularly from the Bible, were prominent in the early 19th century. Girls’ names most frequently found are Mary, used more than twice as often as the number two name, Elizabeth (until 1840, when it became Sarah). Other popular Biblical names for girls were Martha, Ann, Hannah, Rebecca, Rachel and Lydia. More unusual religious names for girls include Christia, Dinah, Dorcas, Electa (which relates to Freemasonry), Kesiah, Jemima, Mahala and Tabitha.

But along with common names like John, James, and Joseph were more unusual Biblical names for boys like Abner, Amos, Asa, Ebenezer, Hezekiah, Hiram, Job, Lemuel, Luther, Moses, Obadiah, Reuben and Thaddeus.

Names From Mythology Or History

Early 19th century Americans revered the classics, with names from mythology or ancient history widely used. These include Cyrus, Erasmus, Homer, Horace, Leonidas and Newton for boys. For girls, the popular classical names include Fidelia, Hulda, Leta, Minerva, Narcissa, Parthena and Sophrona.

Americana Names

In the century after the birth of the United States, names that honored American places and heroes were popular. For girls, these included America, Indiana, Missouri and Tennessee. Americana names for boys included Columbus, Jefferson, Madison, Monroe and Washington.

Gender-Swapping Names

Names in common use for boys from 1800 to 1850 include several choices now found more often for girls. These include Addison, Elisha, Ellis, Emery, Loren, Madison and Marion.

Modern-Sounding Names

Among the old-school Lavinias and Hezekiahs are several names that feel more like modern inventions. For girls, these include Angel, Keri, Lee, Lou, Marci and Rox. Boys’ names with a modern feel include August, Jesse, Miles, Perry, Riley, Taylor and Wesley. Other names with a contemporary style include such nature- and word-inspired names like Dahlia, Easter and Olive for girls and Almond, Green and Pleasant for boys.

Lost Names

Of course there are many names on the rolls for 1800-1850 that are rarely found today. Some names were spelled differently then than they are now, for instance: Malinda, Malissa, Phebe. In addition, names such as Permilia, thought to be an antiquated form of Pamela, as well as Electa, Fidelia, Hulda, Narcissa, Parthena and Sophrona do not appear at all on the 2014 U.S. baby name records.

Boys names found in the records for the first half of the 19th century that do not appear at all on the complete baby names list for 2014 include Adalbert, Erasmus and Lafayette. A number of others hang on with just a handful of modern bearers. These include Chauncy, Elbert, Enos, Granville and Lyman.

Popular Names

While Mary and John held tight to the number one spots through the first half of the 19th century, many of the most popular names of the era are popular and stylish again today, some of them after a long decline (or two) and rebirth. These include Alice, Charlotte, Clara, Emily, Isabella, Julia, Laura and Sophia for girls and Benjamin, Charles, Daniel, Henry Jacob, James, Samuel, and William for boys.
Logged

Crescat Scientia
Zeppelin Captain
*****
United States United States


Fabricator and temporally confused.


« Reply #1 on: March 08, 2016, 03:28:06 am »

If anyone can get ahold of them, college catalogues from the eigteenth and early nineteenth centuries included lists of students.  They are a wealth of very strange-sounding to us but perfectly normal at the time names.

"Abraham" Lincoln was not an anomaly.
Logged

Living on steam isn't easy.
-- Jessica Fortunato

Have you heard?  It's in the stars, next July we collide with Mars.
-- Cole Porter

That's not sinister at all.
-- Old family saying
pakled
Zeppelin Captain
*****
United States United States


Minions Local 305, at your thervice!


« Reply #2 on: March 08, 2016, 03:38:01 am »

Don't know if it helps, but there a lots of 'baby name' sites for various years. I use them for character names, basing them on the year they would be born. I've even seen sites for the French Revolutionary war. Accurate?..dunno, but it's a start
Logged
Hurricane Annie
Zeppelin Captain
*****
New Zealand New Zealand



« Reply #3 on: March 08, 2016, 10:10:04 am »


 Genealogical  research for family trees throws up  some unusual names and  frequency of use across the specific generations. First names were also more ethnically / religion based back then, it can uncover some secrets.
Logged
Crescat Scientia
Zeppelin Captain
*****
United States United States


Fabricator and temporally confused.


« Reply #4 on: March 08, 2016, 04:44:51 pm »

"Dilwyn" was a popular name in some older branches of my family, "Haven" in another.
Logged
madamemarigold
Gunner
**
United States United States


« Reply #5 on: March 21, 2016, 08:50:35 pm »

WOW! In my genealogy I have 24 of those names you have listed! And if I was to pour over my charts I could probably find a few more~  Grin
Logged
creagmor
Zeppelin Captain
*****
South Africa South Africa



« Reply #6 on: March 22, 2016, 06:08:03 am »

Don't know if it's just a recognition phenomenon or not, but, in 1981, when I changed my first name to *Ian the only other one with that name I was aware of was Mr Fleming, of James Bond Fame. Over the years I have discovered many others; some spelled Iain and even an Eoin (Eion?).
   
*Technically speaking I changed languages rather than name. My original name was Jean; French for John, and Ian is Scottish. the main reason for the change was because in the land of my birth, unless one was a famous Frenchman, i.e. Jean Laffite, they are assumed to be female. My Middle name (Arthur) confused things even further. in the late 40s and early 50s, there was a rather popular actress named ... Jean Arthur.

Once, in the mid 70s, I even got a letter from a feminist group asking if I had trouble getting credit because they assumed I was a female. Ironically, upon turning 18, my late ex-wife got a draft notice because here first name was Meredith. Huh?         
Logged

“Love is an emotional thing, and whatever is emotional is opposed to that cold true reason which I place above all things.” Sherlock Holmes, in The Sign of Four.
Sammiannnz
Deck Hand
*
New Zealand New Zealand



« Reply #7 on: March 22, 2016, 11:09:49 am »

Over the years I have discovered many others; some spelled Iain and even an Eoin (Eion?).

I know that Eoin is correct, not sure about Eion.
Eoin can either be pronounced Ian, or Owen, but I've only really come across it as Owen. And that spelling is rarely used outside of the UK anyway so that makes it rarer. I remember when I first came across it as a name, I would pronounce it e-owin. Like of like a donkey's hee-haw. That led to an awkward conversation when I finally learnt how to pronounce it correctly, after being corrected by somebody.
Logged

---------------------------------------------------------
S.N (Sky Navigator) Arianna Malltham at your service. I hail from the vessel O.S.S. (Open Sky Ship) Haven, especially fitted for long distance travel.
We on the O.S.S Haven would like to welcome you, and/or your cargo on board for the journey.

---===###===---

"The universe is under no obligation to make sense to you."
~Neil Degrasse Tyson
creagmor
Zeppelin Captain
*****
South Africa South Africa



« Reply #8 on: March 22, 2016, 12:50:00 pm »

Thanks. I knew it was one or the other. The only Eoin I've met was a native South African and it's been awhile, so I wasn't sure of the latter order. he pronounced it as if it were spelt Ian; and then there's the TV actor Ian Zeering, who pronounces it eye-en.
« Last Edit: March 22, 2016, 12:53:22 pm by creagmor » Logged
Pages: [1]   Go Up
  Print  
 
Jump to:  

Powered by MySQL Powered by PHP Powered by SMF 1.1.20 | SMF © 2013, Simple Machines Valid XHTML 1.0! Valid CSS!
Page created in 0.124 seconds with 16 queries.