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Author Topic: A Traveling Dime Museum  (Read 3653 times)
Maets
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« Reply #50 on: July 13, 2016, 02:49:46 am »

I am not sure what it is, but I like it.
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oprion
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« Reply #51 on: July 13, 2016, 03:12:17 am »

I am not sure what it is, but I like it.

It's an example of a 13th century cyrilic script (that I resurrected in it's modern form) carved into wood wih a CNC machine, wood-stained, gilded, and just now, affixed to a frame. The text spells out "Ivan Gulkov".
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VampirateMace
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Mein Hexapod


« Reply #52 on: July 17, 2016, 08:04:35 am »

I'll be watching this thread now. I find this all both fascinating and delightful, but don't really know what else to type. . .
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oprion
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« Reply #53 on: August 05, 2016, 06:03:23 am »

Dime Museum Hanging Sign
Or desperate efforts to monetize Smiley



« Last Edit: August 05, 2016, 08:13:44 am by oprion » Logged
oprion
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« Reply #54 on: August 14, 2016, 06:12:35 am »

The Gulkoff Family "Théâtre mécanique"

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Dr. Ironbeard
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Avoid the rush....PANIC NOW!!


« Reply #55 on: August 20, 2016, 04:32:04 am »

Marvellous, simply marvellous!! What a simply magical passion!
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MWBailey
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« Reply #56 on: August 20, 2016, 06:12:48 am »

Can you describe how it works? I've always been fascinated by printing presses and the like but never have understood how they work (excluding the original Gutenburg press, I figured that one out, and it was quite fascinating!). I'm an engineering nerd at heart so learning how machines and stuff work, and the history behind them, tickles me pink!


The mechanical movement of platen presses differ between models, but the basic principle is more or less the same.

I made an animated reference for how things operate here: http://oprion.livejournal.com/119972.html

But, broadly speaking, a press has:
1. A "platen" the flat surface unto which the paper is attached.
2. A "press bed" - another flat surface that holds the chase (metal frame) which secures the form (letters and engravings locked up into a tight bundle).
3. When the platen and the press bed come in contact, an impression is made, as the form pushes into the paper.
4. Ink is added from a can to an "ink disk" - the round metal disk on top of the press. It revolves slightly after every impression, thus making the ink distribution more even.
5. Roller arms carry the rollers (different number on different presses, my tiny Sigwalt only has one) across the ink disk, picking up ink, then down across the form, inking up the letters and pictures, then up again to the disk to replenish supplies. Thus, the form is inked twice between impressions.
6. I am omitting the miscellaneous appendages such as tympan, grippers, bales etc. for the benefit of clarity.

I made a video of the whole process a good while back, using a slightly bigger press. The captions are in Russian, but you'll get the idea:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=5Ndfi73kNbI

And another little stom-motion animation (took a bit of time to film Smiley) on how the chase and form are made up):

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=XKmbO1qsreE





I remember a scene, 'way, way back in the 70s or 80s,  from an episode of The Rockford Files, where Rockford printed a business card on-the-spot on the dashboard of his car (to use to pose as some kind of official or other in order to get to talk to someone). He used either an extremely teensy typewriter - they did exist in small enough size, albeit they were manufactured back in the 1920s or 30s through about the mid 50s; a few examples remain extant - or a very teensy printing press to do so; I didn't pay a whole lot of specific attention at the time, and I've never been able to find the scene on youtube or elsewhere, but it seems to me it looked very similar to the smallest press in your sequence of examples - unless I'm remembering via the force of the power of suggestion, of course. My imagination has always remained piqued by that scene, in any case...
« Last Edit: August 20, 2016, 06:15:55 am by MWBailey » Logged

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""quid statis aspicientes in infernum"
von Corax
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« Reply #57 on: August 20, 2016, 03:45:57 pm »


I remember a scene, 'way, way back in the 70s or 80s,  from an episode of The Rockford Files, where Rockford printed a business card on-the-spot on the dashboard of his car (to use to pose as some kind of official or other in order to get to talk to someone). He used either an extremely teensy typewriter - they did exist in small enough size, albeit they were manufactured back in the 1920s or 30s through about the mid 50s; a few examples remain extant - or a very teensy printing press to do so; I didn't pay a whole lot of specific attention at the time, and I've never been able to find the scene on youtube or elsewhere, but it seems to me it looked very similar to the smallest press in your sequence of examples - unless I'm remembering via the force of the power of suggestion, of course. My imagination has always remained piqued by that scene, in any case...

You aren't misremembering. He carried a tiny printing press in the glove box of his car which, IIRC, he used in several episodes.
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By the power of caffeine do I set my mind in motion
By the Beans of Life do my thoughts acquire speed
My hands acquire a shaking
The shaking becomes a warning
By the power of caffeine do I set my mind in motion
The Leverkusen Institute of Paleocybernetics is 5838 km from Reading
oprion
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« Reply #58 on: August 22, 2016, 02:59:17 am »

Something along thee lines? Smiley

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oprion
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« Reply #59 on: April 08, 2017, 08:51:51 am »

A bit of traditional glass sign-painting to promote the wonders of the Miraculously Restorative Tonic.



The artwork:



« Last Edit: April 10, 2017, 10:28:36 pm by oprion » Logged
oprion
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« Reply #60 on: April 10, 2017, 05:41:30 am »

More details of the sign.







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von Corax
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« Reply #61 on: April 10, 2017, 09:37:26 pm »

Very impressed, sir, very impressed indeed. Had I money I would be tempted to offer a commission.
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oprion
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« Reply #62 on: August 05, 2017, 08:23:20 pm »

Shot a little film about the making and use of a family seal.



Materials: wood, epoxy clay, glue, brass hinges
Tools: Proxxon CNC Mill

P.S. Is there a new trick for embedding videos?
« Last Edit: August 06, 2017, 07:03:03 am by oprion » Logged
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