The Steampunk Forum at Brass Goggles
October 22, 2017, 02:08:58 am *
Welcome, Guest. Please login or register.
Did you miss your activation email?

Login with username, password and session length
News: Brassgoggles.co.uk - The Lighter Side Of Steampunk, follow @brasstech for forum technical problems & updates.
 
   Home   Blog Help Rules Login Register  
Pages: 1 [2] 3   Go Down
  Print  
Author Topic: Creating Mad Scientist steampunk outfit  (Read 3674 times)
Crescat Scientia
Zeppelin Captain
*****
United States United States


Fabricator and temporally confused.


« Reply #25 on: March 01, 2016, 04:08:02 am »

could always dye a Howie to be brown or something as well.

Brown = instasteampunk

Ironically, nineteenth century Europeans loved eye-searing colors in their clothing, as shown in many an Impressionist painting.

Mauve, after all, was an eye-watering fluorescent purple-hot-pink dye, which only over time faded to the soft lavender-grey later generations assigned to the color name.

And it wasn't just ladies either.
Logged

Living on steam isn't easy.
-- Jessica Fortunato

Have you heard?  It's in the stars, next July we collide with Mars.
-- Cole Porter

That's not sinister at all.
-- Old family saying
Caledonian
Zeppelin Admiral
******
Netherlands Netherlands


the dragon's called Salmacis


« Reply #26 on: March 01, 2016, 06:18:40 am »

could always dye a Howie to be brown or something as well.

Brown = instasteampunk

Ironically, nineteenth century Europeans loved eye-searing colors in their clothing, as shown in many an Impressionist painting.

Mauve, after all, was an eye-watering fluorescent purple-hot-pink dye, which only over time faded to the soft lavender-grey later generations assigned to the color name.

And it wasn't just ladies either.

I was being sarcastic
Logged

"Crazy pseudo-scot living in a fantasy world"
walking stick
Zeppelin Admiral
******
England England


« Reply #27 on: March 01, 2016, 10:20:34 am »

Nerfpunk. (example below)  Steampunk in the original colours of Nerf Guns. very very bright.

https://www.flickr.com/photos/epbot/6126456900
Logged
Caledonian
Zeppelin Admiral
******
Netherlands Netherlands


the dragon's called Salmacis


« Reply #28 on: March 01, 2016, 09:50:31 pm »

Nerfpunk. (example below)  Steampunk in the original colours of Nerf Guns. very very bright.

https://www.flickr.com/photos/epbot/6126456900


That's pretty cool though
Logged
CrazyLee
Deck Hand
*
United States United States


« Reply #29 on: March 30, 2016, 07:10:50 am »

Yes, I'm back. I've been busy, and I wanted to doodle something up, but I suck at art, and I can't digital color anything worth a damn (I finally figured out how to do it).

If I were to try to get some of my outfit at thrift shops, what should I look for? I have seen some nice pants that were sadly too small for my big waist. I read somewhere to avoid pleated-waist pants.

So, I've been thinking of going for a more engineer/tinkerer/inventor type. This is what I doodled up. It's silly I know. Of course, there would be more, like gadgets, or accessories, a tool belt if I can find one. I had considered a vest if I can figure out a vest that would work (and afford one).  Don't know what kind of hat could go with (bowler?). I already have some stuff picked out for the leather, and it's actually almost black with just a hint of brown. To add color I could consider a different colored shirt, like white, or blue. I liked the idea that guy gave with the robotic arms, but that would require a lot of work (a future prop!).



I found a fabric at a local fabric store that I liked and would consider for a vest or pants. It's a wool/acrylic blend, and is more of a medium brown than the camera photo reveals (the flash lit it up too much). I just wondered if that pinstriping is old enough, since I tend to think pinstriping as 1920-1940s.

Logged

The gears on the airship go round and round, round and round, round and round....
Cmdr. Storm
Officer
***
United States United States


« Reply #30 on: March 30, 2016, 07:17:22 am »

the Apron, You may want to check with Places like Harbor Frieght,etc. or check with Hardware Stores like Ace. did You get the Link i sent You? the Place i Mentioned in the Message Carries that Kind of Stuff @ Really Good Prices. the Goggles, Check with Hardware or Welding Supply Stores. Hope this Helps.
Logged
Prof. Cecily
Snr. Officer
****
Spain Spain



« Reply #31 on: March 30, 2016, 08:20:19 am »

Good morning, ladies and gentlemen.
Try gaiters, stained with unexpected colours.

I remain yours,
Prof. Cecily
Logged
Pileus Copperstipe
Deck Hand
*
United Kingdom United Kingdom


« Reply #32 on: March 30, 2016, 12:21:26 pm »

Look up any pictures of Victorian scientists in their labs, you never see them in a coat, they're always wearing semi-formal clothes, with their sleeves rolled up.
Logged
Caledonian
Zeppelin Admiral
******
Netherlands Netherlands


the dragon's called Salmacis


« Reply #33 on: March 30, 2016, 12:31:42 pm »

Look up any pictures of Victorian scientists in their labs, you never see them in a coat, they're always wearing semi-formal clothes, with their sleeves rolled up.

Quote from: wikipedia
White coats are sometimes seen as the distinctive dress of both physicians and surgeons, who have worn them for over 100 years.[1] In the nineteenth century, respect for the certainty of science was in stark contrast to the quackery and mysticism of nineteenth century medicine. To emphasize the transition to the more scientific approach to modern medicine, physicians sought to represent themselves as scientists, and began to wear the most recognizable symbol of the scientist, the white laboratory coat.[2]

(...)

Until the mid-1920s, students who were examining cadavers would wear black lab coats to show respect for the dead. Black lab coats were used in early biomedical and microbiology laboratories because any contamination that settled on them was easily visible.

Recently, white coat ceremonies have become popular amongst those starting medical school.

The modern white coat was introduced to medicine in the late 1800s as a symbol of cleanliness[3][4]

Logged
Pileus Copperstipe
Deck Hand
*
United Kingdom United Kingdom


« Reply #34 on: March 30, 2016, 12:35:33 pm »

Fair enough, all I know is that we have at least a hundred etchings of scientists from the Victorian times in our department, and not one of them is wearing anything closely resembling a lab coat.
Logged
Caledonian
Zeppelin Admiral
******
Netherlands Netherlands


the dragon's called Salmacis


« Reply #35 on: March 30, 2016, 12:44:33 pm »

Fair enough, all I know is that we have at least a hundred etchings of scientists from the Victorian times in our department, and not one of them is wearing anything closely resembling a lab coat.

that is true, and strange indeed. I suspect that for an etching they have to pose, so they might have decided to put on their best clothing instead of their usual clothing
Logged
Cora Courcelle
Snr. Officer
****
England England



« Reply #36 on: March 30, 2016, 04:07:34 pm »

Anyway, as steampunks we are not bound by 'what actually was', so a scientist/inventor can wear whatever he (or she) wants. 
Logged

You have to tread a fine line between avant-garde surrealism and getting yourself sectioned...
CrazyLee
Deck Hand
*
United States United States


« Reply #37 on: April 02, 2016, 04:29:05 am »

Hmm.

Thought I'd post this here, though it deserves its own thread! If I wanted an apron, I'd want one like this one!!

http://lagueuse.deviantart.com/art/steampunk-leather-apron-404705873

Don't think it's on sale though, it looks like one of a kind for the maker's own use, and it would probably be too expensive for me anyway, in the hundreds. But oh gosh, I'd love something like that.

Also, also on Deviantart, I was very heavily inspired by this guy who also did a sort of Mad Scientist outfit. I hate copying directly from other people's ideas, of course, but I do like the way he did it and may take inspiration from him.
http://cammykillerbee.deviantart.com/art/Steampunk-Mad-Scientist-425272817
http://cammykillerbee.deviantart.com/art/Tastes-Like-Evil-449136500
http://cammykillerbee.deviantart.com/art/The-Contraption-425272275

That guy also does some other impressive steampunk work as well...
Logged
Prof. Cecily
Snr. Officer
****
Spain Spain



« Reply #38 on: April 02, 2016, 09:01:50 am »

Good morning, ladies and gentlemen.
There's nothing wrong with copying, or rather, trying to copy another person's work.
That is, as long as you're prepared to write them a note saying how much you admire their work and even send on a photo of what you came up with.

I remain yours,
Prof. Cecily

Logged
Quin
Snr. Officer
****
Canada Canada


Not mad, just a little odd...


WWW
« Reply #39 on: April 07, 2016, 03:58:12 am »

Keep an eye out for torn/worn leather coats going for cheap at second-hand shops.  I'm currently using one to make a mad-scientist leather apron.  I'm short enough that I can get away with just a jacket-length piece but taller folks would probably need to look for a full-length coat. 

Turn it around and cut the apron out of the back.  Use sleeves for straps and bandoliers-style holders.  Use the rest for making pockets and what-not.  If the style of the coat is suitable, the pockets can be salvaged for actual pockets, so you don't have to do the folding-over-and-heming bit for them.

Good luck.
Logged
Prof. Cecily
Snr. Officer
****
Spain Spain



« Reply #40 on: April 07, 2016, 07:31:23 am »

Good morning, ladies and gentlemen.
Now that's quite clever. And splendid.
Great idea, Quin!

I remain yours,
Prof. Cecily
Logged
CrazyLee
Deck Hand
*
United States United States


« Reply #41 on: April 21, 2016, 01:09:06 am »

Making some progress. Goggles are here.

Now, my question would be... what would be a good hat to go with those goggles, if any?
Logged
Prof. Cecily
Snr. Officer
****
Spain Spain



« Reply #42 on: April 21, 2016, 11:49:03 am »

Good morning, ladiesand gentlemen.
That depends on the goggles and how you wear them.
As a hatband or around your neck, for example.

A modified butcher's cap would be most sinister.

I remain yours,
Prof. Cecily
Logged
CrazyLee
Deck Hand
*
United States United States


« Reply #43 on: April 26, 2016, 03:03:48 am »

I am discovering that second-hand shops don't often have certain things. Like bowties, vests/waistcoats, or belts that fit my large midsection. Or, shirts that I think would go good with the outfit (most look too dressy, modern, or office-ish).

I did find this waistcoat by itself. The back is a satin or silk, shiny. Not a big fan of that.


But, the front of the vest..... looks excellent.
g

So, think it's worth picking up? It's quite cheap, although it doesn't quite fit me (the front of the vest bows out a bit at the arm holes). Could modify it if I don't like the silk on the back, which would take a while.


Also discovering it's impossible to find 0-80 screws in brass that are longer than 1/2 inch. Unless I buy in massive bulk. I guess I could pick up bulk and then sell them by the dozen or so.

(Also, if those pictures don't show up, I'm about to dump photobucket at this point, too much ads and their website is as slow as dialup. They've gone to pot.)
Logged
Prof. Cecily
Snr. Officer
****
Spain Spain



« Reply #44 on: April 26, 2016, 07:47:20 am »

Good morning, ladies and gentlemen.
You never know what you'll find in a secondhand shop.
The waistcoat looks good, though if it needs modding to fit, it may be more trouble than it's worth.
That depends on your sewing skills and your time.

Photobucket's a loss? What site can be recommended?
Imageshack?

I remain yours,
Prof. Cecily
Logged
CrazyLee
Deck Hand
*
United States United States


« Reply #45 on: April 26, 2016, 12:01:35 pm »

Seems the pictures are showing up now.

Good morning, ladiesand gentlemen.
That depends on the goggles and how you wear them.
As a hatband or around your neck, for example.

A modified butcher's cap would be most sinister.

I remain yours,
Prof. Cecily


I was going to wear them around the hat.

What exactly do you mean, "butcher cap"? I get a lot of results on Google, and the most results tend to be mesh trilbys, which seems less steampunk and more 1930s (Dieselpunk?)
Logged
Miranda.T
Zeppelin Captain
*****
United Kingdom United Kingdom



« Reply #46 on: April 26, 2016, 06:52:20 pm »

(snip)

So, think it's worth picking up? It's quite cheap, although it doesn't quite fit me (the front of the vest bows out a bit at the arm holes). Could modify it if I don't like the silk on the back, which would take a while.

(snip)

Hmm, one thought that comes to mind is to add straps to the area that's baggy, either of material or leather from belts or recycled handbag straps (I did something similar to a charity shop dress that was far too stretchy around the back). Tighten the straps to remove sag, but also add loops to them in which to hold the essential mad scientist accessories - test tubes, surgical instruments, aether powered particle accelerators...

Yours,
Miranda.
Logged
Prof. Cecily
Snr. Officer
****
Spain Spain



« Reply #47 on: April 27, 2016, 09:45:20 am »

Good morning, ladies and gentlemen.
...What exactly do you mean, "butcher cap"? I get a lot of results on Google, and the most results tend to be mesh trilbys, which seems less steampunk and more 1930s (Dieselpunk?)

More along these lines:
https://pleasurephotoroom.files.wordpress.com/2012/10/butchers-parisc2a01950-photo-irving-penn.jpg

Although this photo has certain promise as well:
https://s-media-cache-ak0.pinimg.com/236x/41/29/be/4129be841ad039563e09e4e86254a142.jpg

I can't find more photos of what I meant to show you. I'll have to photograph direct examples of this type of cap in daily use in one of Madrid's markets.

I remain yours,
Prof. Cecily
Logged
walking stick
Zeppelin Admiral
******
England England


« Reply #48 on: April 27, 2016, 03:42:58 pm »

This is used by chef's assistants, butchers etc.

http://www.alexandra.co.uk/hospitality-catering/accessories/skull-cap-1#.VyDNbSjKnh
Logged
steiconi
Gunner
**
United States Minor Outlying Islands United States Minor Outlying Islands



« Reply #49 on: June 16, 2016, 07:36:38 pm »

A proper mad scientist would have minions-either paid or built--to do the dirty work, so he wouldn't really need protective gear.

that said, I love the idea of the apron, either made of leather to protect from sparks and flames (check welding supply places, though I made my own from a half cowhide, love the irregular edge) or rubber/rubberized fabric when working with chemicals or brains and such.  Gauntleted gloves or sleeve protectors are good, too.

edited to add:  oooh, google "leather welding" for a huge assortment of possibilities.  I really love the long sleeve "jackets" that only reach the armpits, and have snaps to add an apron.  Looks great in 2 colors and has a feeling of the old lab coats as well.
this link might work: http://tinyurl.com/h78d8gu

I think the real issue is how to convey the "mad" part of the persona.  Tousled hair, maniacal gleam, jerky movements.  For costume, maybe mismatched pieces, or buttoned oddly.  Unevenly shaved face, perhaps.

Do you want "evil" as well?  That seems to be all about facial hair.  Long, waxed mustaches, pointy little beards, sharply angled eyebrows.
Gaudy finger rings and other jewelry seem to be popular with the evil crowd, too.

You can make a modern shirt look more period by cutting off the collar.  Make sure the shirt has a collar band, of course, and use sharp scissors to cut the collar off right where it joins the band.  A common, tight-weave men's shirt will hold up and look good through multiple washings without need to bind or sew it.  Loosely woven fabrics may not fare so well.  You could probably create a faux "french cuff" by cutting the cuffs off one shirt and adding them to another, but that would take some sewing.

I'm not sure about the exact dates for this, but in the late 19th and early 20th centuries, men wore detachable collars and cuffs.  I think this may have been for white-collar workers (maybe that's where that term came from); they wouldn't be able to afford lots of shirts and servants to keep them clean, but would want to look fresh all the time.  i.e., they'd wear the same shirt several days, but put on a clean collar.  Colored shirt were sometimes worn, but the collars were always white.
I believe the attachable collars were originally made from cloth, but I've seen references to "celluloid" collars, probably around 1900-1920.  I read a novel from the mid 1920s which made fun of detachable collars and cuffs as being old fashioned.

Colors--yeah, Victorians loved color!  I do wonder if the steampunk brown-and-black has been adopted through sloppy research.  Sepia-tone photographs and black-and-white etchings and woodcuts show the working class and everyday people, and are far more common than colorful paintings of the aristocrats.  
« Last Edit: June 16, 2016, 08:26:42 pm by steiconi » Logged
Pages: 1 [2] 3   Go Up
  Print  
 
Jump to:  

Powered by MySQL Powered by PHP Powered by SMF 1.1.20 | SMF © 2013, Simple Machines Valid XHTML 1.0! Valid CSS!
Page created in 0.633 seconds with 17 queries.