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Author Topic: What would a 19th century Tardis look like?  (Read 1523 times)
Drew P
Zeppelin Admiral
******
United States United States


« Reply #25 on: December 08, 2015, 01:14:27 pm »

I've sometimes wondered whether the original idea in the show had had been to switch out the props for the TARDIS exterior, but then the showrunners realized how hard it was to find anything else that suited the size/shape/has a door requirements.

Well, if you go way back when the Master was around more, the Master sometimes 'entered' his Tardis by dissappearing behind it. Never really showing a door or such.
Or at least that's how my mind remembers it. And my mind didn't like it.
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Never ask 'Why?'
Always ask 'Why not!?'
Atterton
Time Traveler
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Only The Shadow knows


« Reply #26 on: December 08, 2015, 03:04:14 pm »

I suppose a newspaper vendor kiosk might work. Did they have those or was it all newsies?
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Resurrectionist and freelance surgeon.
Caledonian
Zeppelin Admiral
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Netherlands Netherlands


the dragon's called Salmacis


« Reply #27 on: December 08, 2015, 03:16:26 pm »

I suppose a newspaper vendor kiosk might work. Did they have those or was it all newsies?

our national railway museum has a kiosk like that... fom 1890 I believe
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"Crazy pseudo-scot living in a fantasy world"
Mr Addams
Zeppelin Admiral
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United Kingdom United Kingdom



« Reply #28 on: December 08, 2015, 06:04:07 pm »


I suppose a newspaper vendor kiosk might work. Did they have those or was it all newsies?


our national railway museum has a kiosk like that... fom 1890 I believe


Newspaper Kiosks, and the visually similar advertising stands would work as a Tardis, but most of the pictures I can find are from France or Italy.


This first one, however, is from Manchester Station.















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Atterton
Time Traveler
****

Only The Shadow knows


« Reply #29 on: December 13, 2015, 07:43:03 pm »

It would appear that my question has been answered. A victorian Tardis looks like a mausoleum. Sadly the Tardis key for it has been lost, so nobody has been able to use it for a long time.

http://www.independent.co.uk/news/uk/home-news/brompton-cemetery-the-sealed-mausoleum-believed-to-be-a-fully-functioning-time-machine-a6771076.html
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Keith_Beef
Snr. Officer
****
France France


« Reply #30 on: December 19, 2015, 11:50:59 am »

Wait those things are victorian?

Oh yes, the ones in Paris were introduced during the *I think* 2nd Republic as a public health measure to stop people (mainly men) p*ssing relieving themselves in the street

The emperor Vespasius (ruled from AD69 to AD79) decreed public urinals to be installed in Rome, and this leads the French urinal to be have the polite name "vespasienne".

Wikipedia has an article on the public urinal in general, mentioning a purported invention in Paris in 1830. The French article, however, notes that Vespasius had the urinals installed in order to collect the urine for use in cloth bleaching and dyeing, as it was a very convenient source of ammonia. The emperor then levied a tax on the collected urine, which gave rise to the saying pecunia non olet, or "money has no smell".

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--
Keith
Keith_Beef
Snr. Officer
****
France France


« Reply #31 on: December 19, 2015, 12:06:35 pm »

It would appear that my question has been answered. A victorian Tardis looks like a mausoleum. Sadly the Tardis key for it has been lost, so nobody has been able to use it for a long time.

http://www.independent.co.uk/news/uk/home-news/brompton-cemetery-the-sealed-mausoleum-believed-to-be-a-fully-functioning-time-machine-a6771076.html


Quote from: The Independent
For Mr Godson, a replacement for the key that went missing in the late 1970s would allow him to pay his respects to Hannah Courtoy, his great-great-grandmother, who is interred in the tomb with two of her three daughters. … Mr Coates is so keen to unlock the secrets of the Courtoy mausoleum …that he has organised a storytelling event in the cemetery on 20 December to raise enough money to buy a new key. As he points out: “You can’t just go down to the high street and get a Yale key cut.” What is required is “a big, copper, Lord of the Rings job”. And it will need to be made by a heritage locksmith, because the mausoleum is a listed monument.


I can't find any definition of what a "heritage locksmith" is, and the Indy article is almost pure undiluted fluff.

It seems to me that if Mr Godson has a family claim on the right to open and enter the mausoleum, he should be able to get a locksmith to pick the lock for him.

Anyway, how does this work in the UK? Does the cemetery keep the key to a mausoleum, or does the "owner" (or whatever the term might be)?
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Alexis Voltaire
Rogue Ætherlord
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United States United States


Shàlle We Dànce?


« Reply #32 on: December 19, 2015, 12:45:21 pm »

It would appear that my question has been answered. A victorian Tardis looks like a mausoleum. Sadly the Tardis key for it has been lost, so nobody has been able to use it for a long time.

http://www.independent.co.uk/news/uk/home-news/brompton-cemetery-the-sealed-mausoleum-believed-to-be-a-fully-functioning-time-machine-a6771076.html


Wait 'till he finds out it's actually the side door to Barsoom. Roll Eyes
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