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Author Topic: Disclosing your steampunk nature during jobhunting  (Read 684 times)
Ada Thorold
Zeppelin Captain
*****
United Kingdom United Kingdom



« on: November 07, 2015, 04:18:45 pm »

After nearly 10 years of hiding in academia I am finally faced with the prospect of looking for a job. My mother has suggested I include steampunk on my CV under interests. She thinks that it would make me sound a bit 'quirky' and would help me find a role I would be happy in. On the other hand I'm not sure what the bean counters that will read my CV in the first instance will make of it.

Have other people included steampunk (or other subcultures) on their CVs? If so has it been beneficial?

Thanking you in advance,

~A~
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Captain
Zeppelin Captain
*****
United States United States


The noblest pleasure is the joy of understanding.


WWW
« Reply #1 on: November 07, 2015, 04:47:20 pm »

If you know the enemy and know yourself you need not fear the results of a hundred battles.
Sun Tzu

Research your potential employers and interviewers.  Do not expect being SP to get you hired unless it is in a SP bar but if knowing that you took the moral high ground of full disclosure allows you to stand a little taller and have a little more confidence in your interview than it was worth including. 
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-Karl
Serrac
Officer
***
United Kingdom United Kingdom


« Reply #2 on: November 07, 2015, 04:51:28 pm »


Many recruiters will fixate on the "punk" part and think mohican, piercings, plastic, and all the other stuff from the 80s.
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If I leave my grin behind, remind me that we are all mad here. (SJ Tucker: Cheshire kitten)
Crescat Scientia
Zeppelin Captain
*****
United States United States


Fabricator and temporally confused.


« Reply #3 on: November 07, 2015, 05:04:35 pm »

You could call it "Victoriana".
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Living on steam isn't easy.
-- Jessica Fortunato

Have you heard?  It's in the stars, next July we collide with Mars.
-- Cole Porter

That's not sinister at all.
-- Old family saying
Aubreay Fallowfield
Snr. Officer
****
United Kingdom United Kingdom



« Reply #4 on: November 07, 2015, 07:03:03 pm »

I have put it in my CV and had it raised in interview
didn't get me the job though Cry
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Tis' bona to vada your dolly old eke.
Hez
Zeppelin Captain
*****
Canada Canada


aka Miss Primrose C Leigh


« Reply #5 on: November 07, 2015, 08:36:35 pm »

The important thing is to know your market.  If you are applying for a job that values creativity, e.g. in a publishing house or a graphic design company, it might be a distinct asset. 
If on the other hand you are applying to a hyper conservative bank or insurance company you might not want to highlight your quirkier side and instead spin it as enjoying creating art objects (if that is the side of steampunk that you enjoy) which focuses your ability to learn new skills and overcome obstacles to achieve your goal.  Or a similar approach to writing fiction or whatever is your thing.
The trick is to stand out in a way that fits in with their values.  At that conservative bank interview dress conservatively but wear a unique piece of jewelry or an almost conservative blouse with a high Victorian lace collar.  At the graphic design interview you might wear both and the boots as well.
Yes this might mean tweaking your CV for each application but that is the benefit of computers and the extra work can really pay off in first impressions.
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chicar
Rogue Ætherlord
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Canada Canada


Student in Techno-Shamanism and Lyncanthrope

Chicar556
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« Reply #6 on: November 08, 2015, 12:27:35 am »

The optimistic part of me would tell you to let your interests guide you to your ideal job and not the contrary.

The realistic part of me would note than the previous statement is more easy to say than to do.
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The word pagan came from paganus , who mean peasant . Its was a way to significate than christianism was the religion of the elite and paganism the one of the savage worker class.

''Trickster shows us how we trick OURSELVES. Her rampant curiosity backfires, but, then, something NEW is discovered (though usually not what She expected)! This is where creativity comes from—experiment, do something different, maybe even something forbidden, and voila! A breakthrough occurs! Ha! Ha! We are released! The world is created anew! Do something backwards, break your own traditions, the barrier breaks; destroy the world as you know it, let the new in.''
Extract of the Dreamflesh article ''Path of The Sacred Clown''
Ada Thorold
Zeppelin Captain
*****
United Kingdom United Kingdom



« Reply #7 on: November 08, 2015, 10:18:21 am »

Thanks for replying everyone.

I'm pretty sure that my colleagues in the jobs I'm applying for would find it interesting. But the companies are much larger and probably quite conservative. I'm not sure which desk my application would land on first.

Saying that I think I will put something in, but try and phrase it in a way that say 'I have interesting hobbies' and not 'I am a punk'. It'll be in small letters at the bottom of the cv so by then they'll either love me or be looking for an excuse to get rid of me anyway.

Thank you all,

~A~
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Kensington Locke
Officer
***
United States United States


« Reply #8 on: November 08, 2015, 04:43:12 pm »

The important thing is to know your market.  If you are applying for a job that values creativity, e.g. in a publishing house or a graphic design company, it might be a distinct asset. 
If on the other hand you are applying to a hyper conservative bank or insurance company you might not want to highlight your quirkier side and instead spin it as enjoying creating art objects (if that is the side of steampunk that you enjoy) which focuses your ability to learn new skills and overcome obstacles to achieve your goal.  Or a similar approach to writing fiction or whatever is your thing.
The trick is to stand out in a way that fits in with their values.  At that conservative bank interview dress conservatively but wear a unique piece of jewelry or an almost conservative blouse with a high Victorian lace collar.  At the graphic design interview you might wear both and the boots as well.
Yes this might mean tweaking your CV for each application but that is the benefit of computers and the extra work can really pay off in first impressions.

This is good practical advice.

I would say that in the US, it is recommended that you always tweak your resume for each application.  As a software developer, I adjust and emphasize the technologies and aspects based on what I understand the company is looking for.  A shop looking for a PHP guy is going to see my "converted/migrated to/from PHP" skills more heavily than my "worked with ASP.Net using EntityFramework" accomplishments that wouldn't apply to them.

I would also say that what details and personal information you share likely varies by age of the applicant and nature of position.  A new college grad has little to say for himself but the relevant classes he took, grades and extra-curricular activities that might demonstrate a sense of civic mindedness.  A woman with 20 years work experience doesn't have room or need for listing hobbies and crap she did in college.  She needs all that space to list her previous employees and accomplishments in those positions using the technologies or skills the potential employer is looking to check off for.



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