The Steampunk Forum at Brass Goggles
October 22, 2017, 06:21:51 pm *
Welcome, Guest. Please login or register.
Did you miss your activation email?

Login with username, password and session length
News: Support BrassGoggles! Donate once or $3/mo.
 See details here.
 
   Home   Blog Help Rules Login Register  
Pages: [1] 2 3   Go Down
  Print  
Author Topic: Victorian Smoking Cap Project  (Read 2932 times)
Mme. Ratchet
Officer
***
United States United States


« on: October 15, 2015, 08:07:24 am »

So, I'm hoping to start on this pretty soon. Going to go look at fabrics tomorrow. Found a nice set of directions so I have a general idea of what I'm doing. Only thing I can't figure out is how to do the embroidery on it after I've assembled the pieces. We'll see when I get there. Just figured I'd say something in case anybody was interested.
Logged
Banfili
Zeppelin Captain
*****
Australia Australia



« Reply #1 on: October 15, 2015, 11:59:32 am »

You could lay it out and do the embroidery before putting it together, or, put the outer part together, embroider that, then assemble the lining and padding and stitch it all together.
Logged
Caledonian
Zeppelin Admiral
******
Netherlands Netherlands


the dragon's called Salmacis


« Reply #2 on: October 15, 2015, 01:19:33 pm »

I'll be following
Logged

"Crazy pseudo-scot living in a fantasy world"
Mme. Ratchet
Officer
***
United States United States


« Reply #3 on: October 15, 2015, 03:33:32 pm »

You could lay it out and do the embroidery before putting it together, or, put the outer part together, embroider that, then assemble the lining and padding and stitch it all together.

I had originally thought to lay it out and do it beforehand. A friend of mine mentioned that it may not go together properly or look weird if I do it that way, though. We'll see. I want to go find materials today, first.
Logged
Cora Courcelle
Snr. Officer
****
England England



« Reply #4 on: October 15, 2015, 05:20:07 pm »

It would be a lot easier to do the embroidery first as long as you are very precise about the seam line.  If you try and embroider afterwards you may end up puckering the fabric as it will be quite hard to keep an even tension on it.  Even if the 'embroidery' is actually braid I'd be tempted to do it first.  I'd also put it in a frame to help with the tension; an old picture frame would do if you haven't got a square embroidery/quilting frame.  It's just to make sure the weave of the fabric stays even while you are sewing.  A word of warning though, I really wouldn't use a round embroidery hoop for fine silk or velvet, you will never get the mark of the frame edge out.

I hope you found lots of lovely fabrics and had to buy several because you couldn't make up your mind, so you'll be able to make several ...
Logged

You have to tread a fine line between avant-garde surrealism and getting yourself sectioned...
walking stick
Zeppelin Admiral
******
England England


« Reply #5 on: October 16, 2015, 12:16:50 pm »

It is much easier to embroider on the flat than on a made up garment/hat.  Measurement is the key to getting a pattern to fit and not sew together with a gap or part of the design swallowed by a seam.  However, a relatively plain smoking cap with a tassel and a simple cord or braid trim can look very spiffy too.
Logged
Mme. Ratchet
Officer
***
United States United States


« Reply #6 on: October 16, 2015, 09:55:50 pm »

So, I've looked at fabric options at Michael's, Wal-mart, and Kmart and have not found anything that I like yet. Going to go look at Hancock Fabric's in a few days. This is probably the hardest part so far. Just finding the perfect fabric is a challenge.
Logged
frances
Zeppelin Captain
*****
United Kingdom United Kingdom



« Reply #7 on: October 16, 2015, 10:46:55 pm »

There was a competition a couple of years back on Brass Goggles where people made hats.  Some of these were men's smoking caps.  If you can find these you may get some more ideas.
Logged
Mme. Ratchet
Officer
***
United States United States


« Reply #8 on: October 17, 2015, 06:59:26 am »

I will have a look, then ^_^
Logged
Miranda.T
Zeppelin Captain
*****
United Kingdom United Kingdom



« Reply #9 on: October 17, 2015, 09:12:11 am »

So, I've looked at fabric options at Michael's, Wal-mart, and Kmart and have not found anything that I like yet. Going to go look at Hancock Fabric's in a few days. This is probably the hardest part so far. Just finding the perfect fabric is a challenge.

Have a look around the local charity shops. A cap should not need too much material so you may find a jacket, dress, skirt or even curtains that could donate material.

Yours,
Miranda.
Logged
Prof. Cecily
Snr. Officer
****
Spain Spain



« Reply #10 on: October 17, 2015, 11:11:43 am »

Good morning, ladies and gentlemen.
Charity shops would be my choice for fabrics, as well, my dear Miranda.
A child's dress and a garish scarf provided material for the smoking caps I made as Yuletide presents for two friends of mine.

I remain yours,
Prof. Cecily
Logged
Cora Courcelle
Snr. Officer
****
England England



« Reply #11 on: October 17, 2015, 02:16:58 pm »

Also cushion covers. And some of the fancy satin pillow cases and duvet covers come with a band of embroidery - and leave you with enough fabric to make something else. In fact a duvet cover would leave you with plenty to make a matching waistcoat too.
Logged
Mme. Ratchet
Officer
***
United States United States


« Reply #12 on: October 17, 2015, 03:14:01 pm »

Also cushion covers. And some of the fancy satin pillow cases and duvet covers come with a band of embroidery - and leave you with enough fabric to make something else. In fact a duvet cover would leave you with plenty to make a matching waistcoat too.

That sounds ravishing. Will have a look then while I'm out making my rounds today. Who knows, maybe I'll find something useful. I am planning to get some old ties with which to make day-cravats (they really should be an everyday thing for men and women alike. They add such a nice touch of class ^_^)
Logged
Cora Courcelle
Snr. Officer
****
England England



« Reply #13 on: October 18, 2015, 03:57:11 pm »

We were at friends yesterday evening and I was seriously considering smuggling her curtains home with me to 'adapt' (beautiful wine red brocade with embroidered leaves), but they are also steampunkers and she obviously recognised the look on my face ...  she did tell me where she'd got them from though - a local furnishing company's factory shop. Perhaps you have the same sort of thing local to you?

Happy hunting.
Logged
Mme. Ratchet
Officer
***
United States United States


« Reply #14 on: April 18, 2016, 11:03:12 pm »

At last, after months of searching, I have instructions, most of the materials and tools, time, and energy to begin the project!


One big pile of materials and tools to make the cap. Going to make more than one and then pass on the other hats. I still need to get yarn, embroidery floss, chalk, and a couple of other things before I get started.

« Last Edit: April 18, 2016, 11:41:33 pm by Mme. Ratchet » Logged
Caledonian
Zeppelin Admiral
******
Netherlands Netherlands


the dragon's called Salmacis


« Reply #15 on: April 19, 2016, 08:45:34 am »

I do like the colour of that fabric
Logged
Banfili
Zeppelin Captain
*****
Australia Australia



« Reply #16 on: April 19, 2016, 03:43:10 pm »

Yesterday I found the bits and pieces of my project, and the original. Looks like a good winter project by the wood fire!
Logged
Mme. Ratchet
Officer
***
United States United States


« Reply #17 on: April 19, 2016, 04:12:21 pm »

Im not entirely sold on the grey felt, personally, but it was the best I could find. Ill see how it works and then maybe try finding a different color if I end up not liking it.
Logged
Cora Courcelle
Snr. Officer
****
England England



« Reply #18 on: April 19, 2016, 09:56:07 pm »

At last, after months of searching, I have instructions, most of the materials and tools, time, and energy to begin the project!


One big pile of materials and tools to make the cap. Going to make more than one and then pass on the other hats. I still need to get yarn, embroidery floss, chalk, and a couple of other things before I get started.




Love the colour of that silk.
Just a couple of tips to make life easier when you are embroidering:
1.  Using that embroidery hoop - Wrap  both parts of your embroidery frame before you use it; I always put bias binding round mine but even tissue paper is better than nothing.  Without this it is very difficult to get the fabric to remain taut and if the fabric is not taut the embroidery stitches will not be the correct tension and will either pucker the fabric or be too loose on its surface.  Don't leave the fabric in the hoop when you are not actually embroidering or you will find that you have a near permanent ring in the fabric which can only be removed by extreme ironing, which will in turn crush your embroidery.
2.  Embroidery floss/silk - If you choose the traditional 6 stranded embroidery thread, don't try and use all 6 strands together as it can make stitches look very lumpy and is a *!$%*! to sew, instead split the 6 strands into 3 or even 2 and you will find it covers much more smoothly and evenly - and just as quickly, counter-intuitive as this may seem to be.  It's also easier to thread in your needle (if you can thread 6 strands easily you are not using a needle, you are using a crowbar which will leave larger holes in your fabric).  I can't see from the picture if you have bought dedicated embroidery needles, they have longer eyes than dressmaking ones and are what you need to have as they don't pull the thread into kinks while you are sewing.  Only have about 12 inches of thread in your needle as it is less likely to knot or wear through.

Yes I know that all seems a lot but it makes the actual embroidery go so much better and you can concentrate on the actual stitches if you've got the prep right.
That's what my tutor at the London College of Fashion told me and I've passed the information on to any pupils I've had - which is not you exactly I know, but I do so want your project to go well and for you to enjoy it.  If you want to know more just ask.

Hope you don't mind me sticking my oar in.
Best wishes
Cora
Logged
Prof. Cecily
Snr. Officer
****
Spain Spain



« Reply #19 on: April 20, 2016, 09:12:24 am »

Good morning, ladies and gentlemen.
How generous of you to share those sewing tips with the group, Cora Courcelle.
Really adequate prep work makes sewing much more enjoyable!

I remain yours,
Prof. Cecily
Logged
Mme. Ratchet
Officer
***
United States United States


« Reply #20 on: April 20, 2016, 05:27:29 pm »

Wow, thank you so much for the pointers Cora! Im still fairly new to the whole embroidery thing. As far as the green material goes, the lady at the fabric store pointed me to that and said it was brocade, if that means anything. It definitely doesn't feel like silk. Will that be any different?
Logged
Dr.B.Goodall
Gunner
**
United Kingdom United Kingdom

Be Good All! ;)


« Reply #21 on: April 20, 2016, 06:25:24 pm »

I also have a suggestion for anyone looking for some cheap / free materials to practise with or use for a small project ... Find some local furniture makers and ask them if you could have any of their (fabric and/or leather) scraps / off-cuts.  They may give them to you for free, or you may have to pay a small amount for them.  Either way, you can get a large selection of material for nothing, or next-to-nothing. Wink

If any of these companies start to wonder why you want their scraps, just say you have a project you are working on for a course you are studying, and you need different materials to practise on.  If they already sell their scraps to another company, then you may have to barter for a price on a selection of scraps from them.  If they don't, then you could collect from them at any time and sell on packages of different materials on eBay for a small fee (and a little profit) for the stuff you don't need at the time.  It's a way of recycling, rather than waste after all  Smiley
Logged

"People call me a "Doctor", but only for my skills.  I know nothing of healing the flesh.  Metal, steam, and what I discover in the wastelands are the tools and techniques for my creations in the new world." - Dr.B.Goodall, Wasteland Explorer
Mme. Ratchet
Officer
***
United States United States


« Reply #22 on: April 20, 2016, 06:43:51 pm »

Thats a good idea!
Logged
Cora Courcelle
Snr. Officer
****
England England



« Reply #23 on: April 20, 2016, 06:47:54 pm »

Wow, thank you so much for the pointers Cora! Im still fairly new to the whole embroidery thing. As far as the green material goes, the lady at the fabric store pointed me to that and said it was brocade, if that means anything. It definitely doesn't feel like silk. Will that be any different?

No, in fact it may be easier to embroider than pure silk.  Personally I would do the embroidery then cut out the pieces of the cap pattern so if the edge frays you don't end up with not enough seam allowance to sew it together easily.  (I speak from bitter experience here!)  You can use something like 'Fray Check'* to stop it unravelling at the edge too, but its not invisible on all fabrics and can leave dark marks. Whatever it says on the bottle. (Learned that the hard way too - on my wedding dress, fortunately I had enough fabric to recut the piece in question).
Have fun

Best wishes
Cora

*That's the british name; basically it's a clear liquid that you paint on where you're going to cut and it acts like a sort of bond to stop the threads unravelling.
Logged
Mme. Ratchet
Officer
***
United States United States


« Reply #24 on: April 20, 2016, 06:56:32 pm »

The brocade is actually for the lining. The felt is what I'll likely end up embroidering Smiley

Now that I'm at my computer, I have a bit more to say:
What is bias binding?

When I was first taught the basics for embroidery, I was taught to split the 6-strand floss in to 3 strands and use that.

As far as my needles go, the package says "DMC Embroidery Needles" and has a "3-9" marked on it (I assume that's a size?)

Do you have any more pointers for embroidery? I've had limited experience with it, but the experience I've had I really enjoyed Cheesy
Logged
Pages: [1] 2 3   Go Up
  Print  
 
Jump to:  

Powered by MySQL Powered by PHP Powered by SMF 1.1.20 | SMF © 2013, Simple Machines Valid XHTML 1.0! Valid CSS!
Page created in 0.211 seconds with 16 queries.