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Author Topic: Lovecraft: Fear of the Unknown  (Read 501 times)
GCCC
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« on: October 05, 2015, 09:51:29 am »

Part documentary on the life of H.P. Lovecraft and part examination of his works. Commentary by Neil Gaiman, Guillermo del Toro, John Carpenter, Stuart Gordon, Peter Straub, et al.

Fear of The Unknown: Lovecraft Documentary

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Spoz_1KyZiA
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Miranda.T
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« Reply #1 on: October 05, 2015, 07:49:23 pm »

Part documentary on the life of H.P. Lovecraft and part examination of his works. Commentary by Neil Gaiman, Guillermo del Toro, John Carpenter, Stuart Gordon, Peter Straub, et al.

Fear of The Unknown: Lovecraft Documentary
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Spoz_1KyZiA


Now that's what I call a great panel. Thanks for this link to this.

Yours,
Miranda.
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Barrington Von Steamy
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England England


« Reply #2 on: October 06, 2015, 10:53:24 pm »

It really is a great documentary
I can't make up my mind about his work, some is great,some l literally find usefull when l want to sleep
The ending of the Dunwich horror is very anti climactic, l find
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GCCC
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« Reply #3 on: October 07, 2015, 01:47:38 am »

The same could be said of a lot of his work. I've read where some critics have said that he's excellent at the buildup but drops the ball at the climax. I think Gaiman is the one in the documentary who points out that one of Lovecraft's weaknesses was writing in the first person, where you know at the beginning that the protagonist survives the experience (with the exception where the protagonist is writing his experiences to end with his own demise, in which case it is better if we consider we are reading a transcription of a recording; compare that to Stephen King's "The End of the Whole Mess", which is a first-person "narrator describing his own doom" done right).

None of what I just said diminishes Lovecraft's accomplishments in the least (he has endured for a reason), but even the panel of authors from the documentary admit he wasn't a perfect writer (just a darn good one).

What do the rest of you think?
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