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Author Topic: Your Favorite 19th Century Painting  (Read 4365 times)
von Corax
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« Reply #50 on: October 08, 2015, 09:52:32 pm »

As a Canadian, I must say I have a certain fondness for Emily Carr - her paintings of Canadian weather capture the essence of the thing without peer. The Group of Seven were all dab hands at presenting expressions of Canadian landscape, but there's just something about Ms. Carr's wind-folded cloudscapes...

Alex Colville has also done some extremely powerful imagery, but he misses the target by at least half a century,

If you were pressed to select just one of Ms. Carr's works, which would it be, and why?
I fear I'm not sufficiently art-knowledgeable to do so.
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« Reply #51 on: October 08, 2015, 10:34:09 pm »




Briggate, Leeds (but I can't find a date for this).




There are a lot of conflicting titles for this one, but I'm going with Shipping on the Clyde, 1881.




I can't find this one at all. I've seen similar, but none with the horse and carriage in the lower right depicted here. Anyone able to help with a title and date for this one, and a date for the first one?

Be wary, there are some paintings which are completely different but shown with the same title as another, and variations of the same one.

I do like this style; it's very evocative. Mr. Harrison, what has drawn you to this artist?
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« Reply #52 on: October 08, 2015, 10:40:39 pm »

I fear I'm not sufficiently art-knowledgeable to do so.

Let's approach it this way:  Is there one painting of hers that, for you, evokes a certain mood, emotional response, perhaps triggers some memory? Art speaks to the soul; does one work speak to you in any sort of way?
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« Reply #53 on: October 08, 2015, 10:53:20 pm »

One of my favorites from the Nineteenth century is Victor Vasnetsov's Gamaun, the Prophetic Bird., 1898.

Depicting a creature from Slavic legend, the painting almost comes across as medieval. The Gamaun, a bird with a woman's head clutches a flowering vine that emerges from a stark wetland. She stares as though in a trance to the viewer's left. The red and yellow water and background merge indistinctly in the distance. The picture plane appears flat and ambiguous, emphasizing the other-worldy mood.

The paint is handled comparatively rough in relation to other works by Vasnetsov and seems almost sketch-like. Detail and modeling is reserved for the plumage of the gamaun's body and the blossoms and swirling leaves of the vine. The plant itself spirals in a curve, reminiscent of the borders of medieval manuscript illumination.

What makes this painting so compelling to me is that when I first came across it, I had  just started painting again after a twelve or thirteen year hiatus. My new works were inspired by Flemish tapestries and manuscript images and featured hybridized creatures like the gamaun. Seeing this painting was like coming across someone who spoke the same language as I.

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« Reply #54 on: October 09, 2015, 05:59:20 pm »




Briggate, Leeds (but I can't find a date for this).




There are a lot of conflicting titles for this one, but I'm going with Shipping on the Clyde, 1881.




I can't find this one at all. I've seen similar, but none with the horse and carriage in the lower right depicted here. Anyone able to help with a title and date for this one, and a date for the first one?

Be wary, there are some paintings which are completely different but shown with the same title as another, and variations of the same one.

I do like this style; it's very evocative. Mr. Harrison, what has drawn you to this artist?


His work was introduced to me as a student (in a lecture discussing the growth of industrial cities in the 19th Century).  It was shown as being a pretty good record of just what a Victorian city was like, especially after dark (most of the cityscapes are at either dusk, twilight or at night).  I've always been a fan of atmospheric paintings (did one of my coursework assignments on JMW Turner for art class at school), and this struck me as being very much in the same mould. 
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« Reply #55 on: November 06, 2015, 09:27:55 pm »

There are some fine and interesting paintings in this thtread.

I don't think I could possibly narrow my choice down to a single favorite nineteenth century painting.  I'm not sure I could manage only one per *decade*.  There are so many wonderful choices, from the Nazarenes to the Pre-Raphaelites to Art Nouveau, from Gustav Caillebotte's sharp urban landscapes to Gustav Moreau's feverish mythology, Japanese modernism, academic costume pr0n, the Hudson River school ...

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« Reply #56 on: November 07, 2015, 01:02:13 am »



 I have a penchant for  Pre Raphaelite art.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pre-Raphaelite_Brotherhood

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_Pre-Raphaelite_paintings


 Hylas and the Nymphs is a favourite


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« Reply #57 on: November 07, 2015, 06:03:16 am »

don't know if this counts, but in Florence, next to the river, just down from the famous covered bridge (it's been 20 years, cut me some slack...Wink there's a statue, I think of Garibaldi (the Italian, not the chief of security...Wink with a six-gun, helping another injured soldier...have to admit, it's the only statue with a six-gun I've ever seen...I'm sure someone's made a painting of it...
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« Reply #58 on: November 08, 2015, 03:23:21 am »

I've always liked Turner's Rain, Steam and Speed - The Great Western Railway

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« Reply #59 on: November 08, 2015, 06:47:47 pm »

'The Derby Day', and 'A Private View at the Royal Academy' both by William Powell Frith.
I like them because there are so many different people to look at and the costuming details are fascinating.
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« Reply #60 on: November 09, 2015, 08:36:33 am »

Yet another vote for the Pre Raphaelites; plus Lord Leighton, and an artist with the surname Tadema (sp?) whose first name I cannot recall, but I think was Alfred. Then, as almost an opposite, Dali; providing the period is correct.   
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« Reply #61 on: November 09, 2015, 09:00:42 am »

I've always liked Turner's Rain, Steam and Speed - The Great Western Railway



oh! that's a nice one!

I had yet another one to contribute but I forgot the artist and now I can't find the work to show you
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« Reply #62 on: November 09, 2015, 09:11:23 am »

found it!


Selbstporträt  mit Zylinder(self portrait with tophat), 1892, oil on wood, 61 x 46,5 cm. vienna, Belvedere.
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« Reply #63 on: November 09, 2015, 02:44:31 pm »

Akseli Gallen-Kallela: Lemminkäinen's Mother 1897 (Finnish national epic, Kalevala)
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« Reply #64 on: November 09, 2015, 02:45:34 pm »

Yet another vote for the Pre Raphaelites; plus Lord Leighton, and an artist with the surname Tadema (sp?) whose first name I cannot recall, but I think was Alfred. Then, as almost an opposite, Dali; providing the period is correct.   

I believe you may mean Sir Lawrence Alma-Tadema, a Netherlander who lived in Britain, renowned for his academic paintings of women in luxurious Roman and Greek dress lounging about in classical settings.
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« Reply #65 on: November 12, 2015, 08:48:16 pm »

I'm also a big fan on Akseli Gallen-Kallela and those Kalevala themed paintings are quite popular here in Finland. I just remember that he has made also one quite different piece, what is very close to steampunk style. This is poster art for some Swedish car show from 1907 year. http://www.gallen-kallela.fi/product/akseli-gallen-kallela-bil-bol-juliste/

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« Reply #66 on: November 12, 2015, 09:03:10 pm »

Akseli Gallen-Kallela: Lemminkäinen's Mother 1897 (Finnish national epic, Kalevala)

Thid is an interesting work. It's like the glass Windows you find in churches. I like it.
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« Reply #67 on: November 13, 2015, 01:52:45 pm »

To paraphrase an old idiom; 'I don't know much about art, or art history, but I know what I like.'
So, with that in mind I have to say I love Surrealism (Dali et al) and the precursors in Symbolism. Also the subsequent Expressionism (Wassily Kandinsky) and the abstract.
But to remain in the timeframe of the question that would mean it has to be...

Edvard Munch's 'Der Schrei der Natur' known commonly simply as 'The Scream' (1893).
(No need to post a picture as I'm sure you can all see it in your heads).

But my favourite paintings are from a much earlier period. They would be the Illusionist works of Hieronymus Bosch and, in particular, 'The Garden of Earthly Delights' (between 1490 and 1510).
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« Reply #68 on: November 13, 2015, 02:22:36 pm »

To paraphrase an old idiom; 'I don't know much about art, or art history, but I know what I like.'
So, with that in mind I have to say I love Surrealism (Dali et al) and the precursors in Symbolism. Also the subsequent Expressionism (Wassily Kandinsky) and the abstract.
But to remain in the timeframe of the question that would mean it has to be...

Edvard Munch's 'Der Schrei der Natur' known commonly simply as 'The Scream' (1893).
(No need to post a picture as I'm sure you can all see it in your heads).

But my favourite paintings are from a much earlier period. They would be the Illusionist works of Hieronymus Bosch and, in particular, 'The Garden of Earthly Delights' (between 1490 and 1510).


yes, Bosch's absurdistish work is really interesting...could just look at it for hours.
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« Reply #69 on: November 13, 2015, 03:46:21 pm »

Blast! There are so many from which to choose, even among the artists, let alone individual paintings. The 19th century section of my ideal gallery would include works by (in no particular order): Dante Gabriel Rossetti, Sir Laurence Alma Tadema, Lord Fredrick Leighton, John William Waterhouse, William Holman Hunt, William Bouguereau, Edward Landseer, and Jean-Auguste-Dominique Ingres. I would love to have been able to include Salvador Dali, another of my favourites, but unfortunately he was a few decades too late.       
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« Reply #70 on: November 22, 2015, 06:34:13 pm »

I'm also a big fan on Akseli Gallen-Kallela and those Kalevala themed paintings are quite popular here in Finland. I just remember that he has made also one quite different piece, what is very close to steampunk style. This is poster art for some Swedish car show from 1907 year. http://www.gallen-kallela.fi/product/akseli-gallen-kallela-bil-bol-juliste/




 there is some  fairly incredible poster/ advertising art from that era
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« Reply #71 on: November 22, 2015, 11:53:06 pm »

My love of the Impressionists started when I saw this Monet in a travelling exhibit.
It was the first time a painting had make me stop and stare, completely fascinated.  In fact it was because of this that I started taking art lessons.  Several of the Impressionist works have had the same effect on me since; interesting (Van Gogh) or not (Seurat) in a book or poster but stunning when you see them live on a wall.  
Since the above was painted in 1903 I will choose Cafeterrace am Abend. This had me staring for 5 minutes, walking through another room of the museum then staring for another 5 minutes and repeating for the entire museum.

Why?  (before GCCC gets a chance to ask)  The Impressionists at their best seem to paint how I feel about a scene as well as how I see it.  With Van Gogh too there is a richness/intensity of colour that can make me feel a little tipsy if taken in too large a dose.
« Last Edit: November 22, 2015, 11:56:01 pm by Hez » Logged
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« Reply #72 on: November 23, 2015, 07:14:23 am »

I love landscapes with epic brooding thunderstorms. This is Puget Sound on the Pacific Coast by Albert Bierstadt



There's another one I like, but don't know the name of to look it up: a tall ship trapped in arctic ice with a black storm over hills and a polar bear in one corner. I'd love to find what it was and get a print of it someday.
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« Reply #73 on: December 13, 2015, 03:43:02 pm »

I love landscapes with epic brooding thunderstorms. This is Puget Sound on the Pacific Coast by Albert Bierstadt



There's another one I like, but don't know the name of to look it up: a tall ship trapped in arctic ice with a black storm over hills and a polar bear in one corner. I'd love to find what it was and get a print of it someday.

It is a moody and moving piece. I can see  why it grabs you.

 Have you tried google reverse images ?  If you find the picture,  copy n  paste the picture in  or the http  and it  searches for it online . 
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« Reply #74 on: December 19, 2015, 11:47:46 am »

Ilya Repin: Reply Of The Zaporozhian Cossacks To Sultan Mehmed IV of The Ottoman Empire

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Reply_of_the_Zaporozhian_Cossacks#/media/File:Ilja_Jefimowitsch_Repin_009.jpg

That's one of my favourites, too.

I find it difficult impossible to choose a single favourite painting from any period, but I'm a great fan of the Pre-Raphaëlites. This ranks very highly among them.
« Last Edit: December 19, 2015, 11:51:22 am by Keith_Beef » Logged

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