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Author Topic: Your Favorite 19th Century Painting  (Read 4555 times)
Banfili
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« Reply #25 on: October 05, 2015, 12:35:27 pm »

GCCC, I can't give you a rational explanation, just that there is something in it that speaks to me. I am a painter myself, semi-abstract to abstract colourist, and there is a touch of both in the painting.
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Banfili
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« Reply #26 on: October 05, 2015, 12:38:45 pm »

Caledonian, I have the first of the books - loved it, and put the others on my 'To Get' list for someday. A big Imperial dragon, if memory serves me!
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Caledonian
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the dragon's called Salmacis


« Reply #27 on: October 05, 2015, 01:28:47 pm »

Caledonian, I have the first of the books - loved it, and put the others on my 'To Get' list for someday. A big Imperial dragon, if memory serves me!

no idea XD I read the dutch copies, names of species are different then
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« Reply #28 on: October 05, 2015, 05:17:57 pm »

Yeah, Thomas Cole, and I do like the whole series. The ones I saw were at the Smithsonian in DC. Though the 3rd one was also used on (showing my age...Wink a Kansas album cover

I just like Mucha in general, it would be hard to pick a favorite. I like Escher too, but that's way outside the parameters here...Wink I once had a coffee table book of Mucha, but lawd knows where it got off to...:|
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Caledonian
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the dragon's called Salmacis


« Reply #29 on: October 05, 2015, 06:14:31 pm »

Yeah, Thomas Cole, and I do like the whole series. The ones I saw were at the Smithsonian in DC. Though the 3rd one was also used on (showing my age...Wink a Kansas album cover

I just like Mucha in general, it would be hard to pick a favorite. I like Escher too, but that's way outside the parameters here...Wink I once had a coffee table book of Mucha, but lawd knows where it got off to...:|


But Escher it absolutely brilliant!!
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Emile
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« Reply #30 on: October 05, 2015, 09:07:42 pm »

I've never had a favourite one. Any of the Parisian nightlife paintings by Manet or Lautrec would do nicely in my opinion.

Yes, I'm going with Lautrec too, though in reality, I've always considered myself to be much more of an eighteenth century (or earlier) sort of man.... forget not old friends like Tesivious, and Hero, the Moses of steampunk.
« Last Edit: October 05, 2015, 11:38:50 pm by Emile » Logged
Emile
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« Reply #31 on: October 05, 2015, 11:26:13 pm »

....Escher is absolutely brilliant!!

Escher, the mathematician/artist hybrid. People used to say my work reminded them of his.... when I was younger.
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GCCC
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« Reply #32 on: October 05, 2015, 11:38:02 pm »

GCCC, I can't give you a rational explanation, just that there is something in it that speaks to me. I am a painter myself, semi-abstract to abstract colourist, and there is a touch of both in the painting.

Well, the fact that you yourself paint in a similar style says enough, I would think.
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GCCC
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« Reply #33 on: October 05, 2015, 11:41:04 pm »

I've never had a favourite one. Any of the Parisian nightlife paintings by Manet or Lautrec would do nicely in my opinion.

Yes, I'm going with Lautrec too, though in reality, I've always considered myself to be much more of an eighteenth century (or earlier) sort of man.... forget not old friends like Tesivious, and Hero, the Moses of steampunk.

Emile, I'm not getting good hits for either of those names. Could you point me in the right direction?
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Emile
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« Reply #34 on: October 06, 2015, 12:15:53 am »

Yes, I'm going with Lautrec too, though in reality, I've always considered myself to be much more of an eighteenth century (or earlier) sort of man.... forget not old friends like Tesivious, and Hero, the Moses of steampunk.

Emile, I'm not getting good hits for either of those names. Could you point me in the right direction?

Whoooops! Sorry about that.... I'm afraid I wandered there a bit. Not surprising, I've been drinking!!

It looks like I started out commenting on my liking Lautrec as a favorite nineteenth century artist and then wandered into the realm of the old Greek inventors somehow.... Tesivius (or Ctesibius or Ktesibios or Tesibius etc., you know.... the water clock guy) and Hero of Alexandria (the first steam engine guy).

But then I seem to have come back on topic (somewhat anyway, if one looks at it a certain way) with my comment on Escher (in spite of his having worked in the twentieth century not the nineteenth)....

Escher, the mathematician/artist hybrid. People used to say my work reminded them of his.... when I was younger.

....if it's any consolation (not sure if it really is). Clearly I'm having trouble.... Hah!
« Last Edit: October 06, 2015, 01:07:01 am by Emile » Logged
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« Reply #35 on: October 06, 2015, 08:36:03 am »

As a Canadian, I must say I have a certain fondness for Emily Carr - her paintings of Canadian weather capture the essence of the thing without peer. The Group of Seven were all dab hands at presenting expressions of Canadian landscape, but there's just something about Ms. Carr's wind-folded cloudscapes...

Alex Colville has also done some extremely powerful imagery, but he misses the target by at least half a century,
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GCCC
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« Reply #36 on: October 06, 2015, 06:33:45 pm »

As a Canadian, I must say I have a certain fondness for Emily Carr - her paintings of Canadian weather capture the essence of the thing without peer. The Group of Seven were all dab hands at presenting expressions of Canadian landscape, but there's just something about Ms. Carr's wind-folded cloudscapes...

Alex Colville has also done some extremely powerful imagery, but he misses the target by at least half a century,

If you were pressed to select just one of Ms. Carr's works, which would it be, and why?
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Caledonian
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the dragon's called Salmacis


« Reply #37 on: October 06, 2015, 06:38:26 pm »

I'd like to contribute
Isaac Israels, Scottish Dance, 1872, oil on canvas

« Last Edit: October 06, 2015, 06:45:13 pm by Caledonian » Logged
Flightless Phoenix
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« Reply #38 on: October 06, 2015, 09:32:16 pm »

Some rather lovely choices in this thread - my favourite of those posted is The Fighting Temeraire because I saw it in an exhibition that I attended with my dad about 12 years ago, and I brought him a large print for his birthday - it's still hanging in his living room and I never get tired of it.

I also love David Caspar Friedrich, Mucha, Escher and many of the other works chosen, but for my own personal favourite painting...

I think it has to be The Magic Circle by John William Waterhouse (1886), which I had the very good fortune of seeing in an exhibition in 2012 entitled Love and Death - about the Pre-raphaelites and their treatment of those themes. Although it's quite a dark painting compared to the typical Pre-raphaelite vibrancy, the lighting is perfect and the details are so alive. The magic and the setting seem so true to life that you can almost hear the ravens and smell the smoke- despite the historical inaccuracies I can believe she's a real woman in a real place. This was was a marvelous contrast to Morgan-le-Fey by Frederick Sandys (1863/4) that was hung beside it - which is a rather theatrical and slightly gaudy take on witchcraft to my eye, without much subtlety or human feeling.

I can't post an image because I've lost the login info for my photobucket, but here's a link:
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Magic_Circle_(Waterhouse_painting)
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GCCC
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« Reply #39 on: October 07, 2015, 12:55:05 am »

I'd like to contribute
Isaac Israels, Scottish Dance, 1872, oil on canvas



Besides your obvious fascination with Scotland, why do you choose this painting?
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GCCC
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« Reply #40 on: October 07, 2015, 01:09:12 am »

...I think it has to be The Magic Circle by John William Waterhouse (1886), which I had the very good fortune of seeing in an exhibition in 2012 entitled Love and Death - about the Pre-raphaelites and their treatment of those themes. Although it's quite a dark painting compared to the typical Pre-raphaelite vibrancy, the lighting is perfect and the details are so alive. The magic and the setting seem so true to life that you can almost hear the ravens and smell the smoke- despite the historical inaccuracies I can believe she's a real woman in a real place. This was was a marvelous contrast to Morgan-le-Fey by Frederick Sandys (1863/4) that was hung beside it - which is a rather theatrical and slightly gaudy take on witchcraft to my eye, without much subtlety or human feeling...


Here's The Magic Circle...


https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:John_William_Waterhouse_-_Magic_Circle.JPG

...and, for comparison, Morgan le Fay...


https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:Sandys,_Frederick_-_Morgan_le_Fay.JPG

I have to say I quite agree with your assessment; I find the former superior to the latter both in mood and coloring. The latter may have more technical superiority, but I'll defer that to our artists for discussion.
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Caledonian
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the dragon's called Salmacis


« Reply #41 on: October 07, 2015, 07:47:58 am »

I'd like to contribute
Isaac Israels, Scottish Dance, 1872, oil on canvas



Besides your obvious fascination with Scotland, why do you choose this painting?

On the painting: i love the use of the mirror and (if you see it life, in the Dordrechts Museum) tge red really jumps out, catching the eye. It's good example of impressionistic painting, where the air and feel have been caught nicely.

But my real reason is a historical connotation.
This work wad made not far from my home, in the city of Dordrecht. It shows a happening that back then shocked the area...Scottish dances had not been seen in the conservative Land of Heusden and Altena. Let alone men in skirts! The painting shows a dutch lady dressing up, ehat is thought to be either her mother or maid helps her dress in the 'exotic' wear.

It reminds me of how small the world was back then (in my area at least) and how lucky I am to be able to travel.
But I also like to imagine the wonder and laughs the festival must have generated, how people from all around would have traveled to the city to in awe and expectations.

And, you know, I just really like Scottish stuff.

Also note that the dutch artist has given it an English title, that wasn't my translation. That was very unusual! I haven't seen that in any other works and I like that.
« Last Edit: October 07, 2015, 07:51:12 am by Caledonian » Logged
GCCC
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« Reply #42 on: October 07, 2015, 08:03:19 am »

Is it a truism, then, that experiencing the painting in the flesh, so to speak, evokes a much stronger emotional response than merely seeing flat representations of same? I think of the obvious effect such viewings held for you with Scottish Dance, Flightless Phoenix with The Magic Circle and The Fighting Temeraire, and myself with The Starry Night. Is it possible to gain a real sense of the work without being in its presence?

I did not realize that was a woman in the painting; I presumed that it was a long-haired Scottish lad. Thanks for providing the story behind the painting.
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Caledonian
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the dragon's called Salmacis


« Reply #43 on: October 07, 2015, 08:16:01 am »

Is it a truism, then, that experiencing the painting in the flesh, so to speak, evokes a much stronger emotional response than merely seeing flat representations of same? I think of the obvious effect such viewings held for you with Scottish Dance, Flightless Phoenix with The Magic Circle and The Fighting Temeraire, and myself with The Starry Night. Is it possible to gain a real sense of the work without being in its presence?

I did not realize that was a woman in the painting; I presumed that it was a long-haired Scottish lad. Thanks for providing the story behind the painting.

It is true that images don't hold the full experience. Art and culture students like myself are pushed to go see works for real for various reasons. The colour of the picture varies depending on the print or screen, you rarely get a life size copy, the frame(especially when it's a frame from the same period) often contributes to the painting, lightfall on the paint can make it look different, more standing out. Strokes like Those of Van Gogh and Rembrandt van Rijn look significantly different on pictures...
Not to forget that some paintings are made to be seen from a specific point, like below it. There are works made to be hung on the ceiling! If you view images of those the perspective may look really weird.

It is hard to capture such thing without seeing and experiencing it yourself.

You're welcome Smiley i plan on doing some research on the work someday...
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Caledonian
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the dragon's called Salmacis


« Reply #44 on: October 07, 2015, 08:33:39 am »

And now we're talking art and culture, I'd like to point out the Victorians were absolutely terrible when it came to restoring and preserving.
In the Netherlands they shamelessly used the wrong materials and designs, either because they thought it to be prettier or more durable, or simply because they did way too little research.
The Sint Jan in 'sHertogenbosch for example, used to be built in a vibrant white chalkstone, but when restorations were done they used a black type. Sure, the black stone will stand for ages, but it does alter the looks so badly...
They also used patterns that don't fit medieval standards at all, for example in windows, where they boldly used circles were fourpasses were expected.

And they rubbed the paint of almost all medieval statues, attempting to make them fit in the image of a sober and simple middle ages.



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GCCC
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« Reply #45 on: October 07, 2015, 08:42:14 am »

What do you think of the inclusion of the angel with the mobile phone included in the current restoration efforts?
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Caledonian
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the dragon's called Salmacis


« Reply #46 on: October 07, 2015, 08:48:13 am »

What do you think of the inclusion of the angel with the mobile phone included in the current restoration efforts?

*eye twitch*
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Caledonian
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the dragon's called Salmacis


« Reply #47 on: October 07, 2015, 08:54:47 am »

I am...not too fond of the statue.

To say the least.

I haven't looked into the reasoning behind it enough to actually form a rounded opinion.
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Burgess Shale
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« Reply #48 on: October 08, 2015, 08:37:32 pm »

I can't decide on a favorite movement or artist, much less a specific painting.
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« Reply #49 on: October 08, 2015, 09:12:40 pm »

Any of John Atkinson Grimshaw's atmospheric city paintings. 





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