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Author Topic: Your Favorite 19th Century Painting  (Read 4510 times)
chicar
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« on: October 04, 2015, 01:16:17 am »

(sorry in advance if it doesn't count as on topic)

What your favorite painting from the 1800's ?

Me ? Caspar David Friedrich's ''Voyageur Contemplant Une Mer De Nuage'', surely the more cinematographic ancient painting ever. It look like something you can find in cgstudios forum:
https://www.bing.com/images/search?q=voyageur+contemplant+une+mer+de+nuage&view=detailv2&&id=63563BB20768ED0905ADAD5289AE3D37A9B746A9&selectedIndex=0&ccid=VUhCuhui&simid=608009104604401296&thid=OIP.M554842ba1ba2ce440e55dafc5bba4f2eo0
« Last Edit: October 04, 2015, 01:24:50 am by chicar » Logged

The word pagan came from paganus , who mean peasant . Its was a way to significate than christianism was the religion of the elite and paganism the one of the savage worker class.

''Trickster shows us how we trick OURSELVES. Her rampant curiosity backfires, but, then, something NEW is discovered (though usually not what She expected)! This is where creativity comes from—experiment, do something different, maybe even something forbidden, and voila! A breakthrough occurs! Ha! Ha! We are released! The world is created anew! Do something backwards, break your own traditions, the barrier breaks; destroy the world as you know it, let the new in.''
Extract of the Dreamflesh article ''Path of The Sacred Clown''
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« Reply #1 on: October 04, 2015, 07:27:26 am »

There are so many to choose from, but if I had to steal preserve one for posterity it would be Cezanne's 'The Lac d'Annecy'.
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« Reply #2 on: October 04, 2015, 08:27:41 am »

Anything by J. M. W. Turner

The Fighting Temeraire

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« Reply #3 on: October 04, 2015, 09:04:28 pm »

Temeraire - heh, there's a series of fantasy books by Naomi Novik where the dragon is named such...Wink

There was an artist named Cole, who did a series of paintings on the ages of man. The first one is of childhood, with Heaven in the background...don't recall the name, but I likes it...Wink

I'd say anything by Mucha, but I'm not sure if he hits the period, and besides, they're mostly not paintings (though he did a few, I recall)



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« Reply #4 on: October 04, 2015, 10:05:10 pm »

Van Gogh's The Starry Night, 1889. I had always enjoyed it, having only seen flat reproductions, but once I saw it in person, and saw that it was three-dimensional (he layered on paint to create textures, so different parts of the painting stand out from the canvas more than others), it shot to the top of my list. I stared at it so long the docents had to ask me to move (it's not very big, so with me right up front it was hard for others to get a good look at it). But it is just that awe-inspiring. Trust me when I say that seeing any flat (2D) reproduction of this famous painting does not do the original justice. Anything that swirls or rolls leaps towards the viewer.

Image within:
« Last Edit: October 04, 2015, 10:20:19 pm by GCCC » Logged
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« Reply #5 on: October 04, 2015, 10:11:26 pm »

(sorry in advance if it doesn't count as on topic)

What your favorite painting from the 1800's ?

Me ? Caspar David Friedrich's ''Voyageur Contemplant Une Mer De Nuage'', surely the more cinematographic ancient painting ever. It look like something you can find in cgstudios forum:
https://www.bing.com/images/search?q=voyageur+contemplant+une+mer+de+nuage&view=detailv2&&id=63563BB20768ED0905ADAD5289AE3D37A9B746A9&selectedIndex=0&ccid=VUhCuhui&simid=608009104604401296&thid=OIP.M554842ba1ba2ce440e55dafc5bba4f2eo0

Original German title Der Wanderer über dem Nebelmeer, known in English as Wanderer above the Sea of Fog and Wanderer Above the Mist, 1818.

Very nice. Why did you choose this one?

Image within:
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« Reply #6 on: October 04, 2015, 10:16:45 pm »

I've never had a favourite one. Any of the Parisian nightlife paintings by Manet or Lautrec would do nicely in my opinion. Besides that the most interesting are the prints by various artists of the Meiji Era in Japan.


Un Bar aux Folies-Bergère, by Édouard Manet, 1882.


Salon at the Rue des Moulins, Henri de Toulouse-Lautrec, 1894


Meiji Constitution Promulgation
(woodblock print by T. Chikanobu)

« Last Edit: October 04, 2015, 10:43:43 pm by J. Wilhelm » Logged

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« Reply #7 on: October 04, 2015, 10:24:42 pm »

There are so many to choose from, but if I had to steal preserve one for posterity it would be Cezanne's 'The Lac d'Annecy'.

This one intrigues me; nature combined with sharper geometry. What about this 1896 painting makes it your favorite?

Image within:

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« Reply #8 on: October 04, 2015, 10:34:20 pm »

Ilya Repin: Reply Of The Zaporozhian Cossacks To Sultan Mehmed IV of The Ottoman Empire

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Reply_of_the_Zaporozhian_Cossacks#/media/File:Ilja_Jefimowitsch_Repin_009.jpg

Funny characters with great looking facial expressions in that classic picture. (Moustaches are also quite nice touch..)

This is also quite impressive Russian piece: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Vasily_Vereshchagin#/media/File:Apotheosis.jpg
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« Reply #9 on: October 04, 2015, 11:11:19 pm »

Ilya Repin: Reply Of The Zaporozhian Cossacks To Sultan Mehmed IV of The Ottoman Empire

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Reply_of_the_Zaporozhian_Cossacks#/media/File:Ilja_Jefimowitsch_Repin_009.jpg

Funny characters with great looking facial expressions in that classic picture. (Moustaches are also quite nice touch..)

This is also quite impressive Russian piece: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Vasily_Vereshchagin#/media/File:Apotheosis.jpg

That was probably the inspiration for the Jagger monsters in Girl Genius  Grin
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« Reply #10 on: October 05, 2015, 12:40:05 am »

Anything by J. M. W. Turner

The Fighting Temeraire

Spoiler (click to show/hide)


Haunting. Interesting choice; why did you select this 1838 painting (full title:  The Fighting Temeraire tugged to her last Berth to be broken up, 1838) over his other works?

Myself, I fancy this one of Turner's:  Calais Pier, 1803. This reminds me of the anticipated fury of an oncoming storm at the shore juxtaposed with that feeling of exuberant exaltation which surges in the soul from the feel of the wind and the scent of the rain over salt water.

Image within:
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« Reply #11 on: October 05, 2015, 01:04:29 am »

...There was an artist named Cole, who did a series of paintings on the ages of man. The first one is of childhood, with Heaven in the background...don't recall the name, but I likes it...Wink

Is this your card?
Thomas Cole, The Voyage of Life:  Childhood, 1842:

This painting is one in a series of four, The Voyage of Life, all completed the same year. Is just the one your favorite, or are you considering the set as a whole? Regardless the answer, I would like to know why you chose this work.

Out of this series, I prefer #3, The Voyage of Life:  Manhood. To me this speaks to the trials and travails of life, with all its uncertainties, but with the promise of calm just ahead and the sure knowledge that one is not going through this alone.

The remaining three in the series:
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chicar
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« Reply #12 on: October 05, 2015, 01:17:48 am »

(sorry in advance if it doesn't count as on topic)

What your favorite painting from the 1800's ?

Me ? Caspar David Friedrich's ''Voyageur Contemplant Une Mer De Nuage'', surely the more cinematographic ancient painting ever. It look like something you can find in cgstudios forum:
https://www.bing.com/images/search?q=voyageur+contemplant+une+mer+de+nuage&view=detailv2&&id=63563BB20768ED0905ADAD5289AE3D37A9B746A9&selectedIndex=0&ccid=VUhCuhui&simid=608009104604401296&thid=OIP.M554842ba1ba2ce440e55dafc5bba4f2eo0

Original German title Der Wanderer über dem Nebelmeer, known in English as Wanderer above the Sea of Fog and Wanderer Above the Mist, 1818.

Very nice. Why did you choose this one?



I just find it stunning. You can find in it the love for the surnatural of the romantics. You almost expect a ryu to come out of the clouds.
« Last Edit: October 05, 2015, 01:20:20 am by chicar » Logged
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« Reply #13 on: October 05, 2015, 02:05:55 am »

...I'd say anything by Mucha, but I'm not sure if he hits the period, and besides, they're mostly not paintings (though he did a few, I recall)

Are you talking about Alphonse Mucha (born Alfons Maria Mucha) 1860-1939? I like his Art Nouveau work, but I would be hard pressed to pick a single one of his works. Which of his would you pick as your favorite, and why?

A sample of his work:  Salammbô, an 1896 lithograph inspired by Gustave Flaubert's 1862 novel of the same name. (May be NSFW, depending on how where you work feels about partial art nudity.)
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« Reply #14 on: October 05, 2015, 02:21:38 am »

I just find it stunning. You can find in it the love for the surnatural of the romantics. You almost expect a ryu to come out of the clouds.


I don't know what a "ryu" is (and a Google search only showed a Street Fighter character), but I think I understand what you mean.

A couple of art students discuss the work in this short (4:37) clip:
Spoiler (click to show/hide)
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chicar
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« Reply #15 on: October 05, 2015, 02:37:04 am »

Ryu=Chinese Dragon
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« Reply #16 on: October 05, 2015, 02:41:10 am »

Ryu=Chinese Dragon

Well, that makes sense. Although the painting is by a German, a European dragon would destroy the peacefulness of the scene, where a Chinese dragon would not.
« Last Edit: October 05, 2015, 02:46:40 am by GCCC » Logged
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« Reply #17 on: October 05, 2015, 02:47:23 am »

I've never had a favourite one. Any of the Parisian nightlife paintings by Manet or Lautrec would do nicely in my opinion. Besides that the most interesting are the prints by various artists of the Meiji Era in Japan.


Un Bar aux Folies-Bergère, by Édouard Manet, 1882.


Salon at the Rue des Moulins, Henri de Toulouse-Lautrec, 1894


Meiji Constitution Promulgation
(woodblock print by T. Chikanobu)



What about these artists (and the works you've selected to represent them) appeals to you?

(Note:  The Toyohara Chikanobu print is dated 1889, in case anyone else besides me was wondering.)
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« Reply #18 on: October 05, 2015, 03:19:05 am »

Ilya Repin: Reply Of The Zaporozhian Cossacks To Sultan Mehmed IV of The Ottoman Empire

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Reply_of_the_Zaporozhian_Cossacks#/media/File:Ilja_Jefimowitsch_Repin_009.jpg

Oh, this one is just too good; even more so when one knows the backstory. This painting perfectly captures the attitude of the subjects! I've been asking everyone else to explain what about their choice speaks to them, but I think this one is about the brotherhood of the men and the joy of defiance; one can't help but feel these men's exuberance. (If you took away something different, and that's why you chose it, please share, won't you?)

The backstory of this work (alternately titled Cossacks of Saporog Are Drafting a Manifesto and completed in 1891) is very, very NSFW (but hysterical!):
Spoiler (click to show/hide)
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« Reply #19 on: October 05, 2015, 03:33:02 am »


Impressive, indeed, and almost the antithesis of your previous selection. I'm reading where the artist, Vasily Vasilyevich Vereshchagin, used his paintings to promote peace by depicting the horrors of war. In this one, he definitely succeeds in the horror department.

As with the choices of others, I want to ask you why you chose this piece.

The Apotheosis of War, 1871:

Side note:  Wasn't this used as an album cover at one time?
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« Reply #20 on: October 05, 2015, 03:50:55 am »



Impressive, indeed, and almost the antithesis of your previous selection. I'm reading where the artist, Vasily Vasilyevich Vereshchagin, used his paintings to promote peace by depicting the horrors of war. In this one, he definitely succeeds in the horror department.

As with the choices of others, I want to ask you why you chose this piece.

The Apotheosis of War, 1871:

Side note:  Wasn't this used as an album cover at one time?

*Triple back flip loop de loop ROFL*
That is awesome.
I've never had a favourite one. Any of the Parisian nightlife paintings by Manet or Lautrec would do nicely in my opinion. Besides that the most interesting are the prints by various artists of the Meiji Era in Japan.


Un Bar aux Folies-Bergère, by Édouard Manet, 1882.


Salon at the Rue des Moulins, Henri de Toulouse-Lautrec, 1894


Meiji Constitution Promulgation
(woodblock print by T. Chikanobu)




What about these artists (and the works you've selected to represent them) appeals to you?

(Note:  The Toyohara Chikanobu print is dated 1889, in case anyone else besides me was wondering.)


1889 Paris was the place my great grandparents came from. Nor that my Great grandfather would have visited those night clubs,  but that was the heart of Parisian life.  I can almost see myself there.  Somehow,  the time that separates us is irrelevant and negligible.

1889 Photochrom print of the Exposition Universelle by Photoglob Zürich (CC)
Spoiler (click to show/hide)



The Japanese prints are steam punky by nature. The combination of the local culture and the Victorian aesthetic is not dissimilar  to the contrast between 21st C technology  and our Victorianesque aesthetic, if you think about it.  The same thing happened  in Mexico during the same period.

Empress Shōken and Steam Ship. Chikanobu Toyohara (1881).
« Last Edit: October 05, 2015, 05:23:36 am by J. Wilhelm » Logged
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the dragon's called Salmacis


« Reply #21 on: October 05, 2015, 07:13:21 am »

Caspar David Friedrich, A wanderer above the sea of mist, 1818, oil on canvas

But basically everything by Friedrich. Big fan of romantic artworks.


Saw this one in the Belvedare in vienna last year and it's a close second.
« Last Edit: October 05, 2015, 07:19:52 am by Caledonian » Logged

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« Reply #22 on: October 05, 2015, 07:17:34 am »

Caspar David Friedrich, A wanderer above the sea of mist, 1818, oil on canvas

But basically everything by Friedrich. Big fan of romantic artworks.

Why this particular work?
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the dragon's called Salmacis


« Reply #23 on: October 05, 2015, 07:46:20 am »

Caspar David Friedrich, A wanderer above the sea of mist, 1818, oil on canvas

But basically everything by Friedrich. Big fan of romantic artworks.

Why this particular work?

I love the air it has, really. And I'm a bit envious of said wanderer, wish I was standing there, masses of clouds and mountains. That view.
To me, this marks an early hight in the romance genre, even more than "freedom leading the folk", wanderer above the sea of mist shows what romance art stands for.
Love for the wonders of nature, trying to dodge the reality of dirt and industry filled cities, an ode to new hights.

Besides that, I like the composition and chosen point of view, in which we look at the man, over his shoulder but still below him, as he's standing on a higher platform. Both physically and mentally.

Not to forget cleverly chosen colours that apeal to the visor while remaining an air of mystery and wonder.
Friedrich is a master with blues and greys, without doubt one of the most interesting artists of the 19th century. (Sorry Vincent. You're the worst impressionist I've ever seen and heavily overrated)

« Last Edit: October 05, 2015, 07:51:56 am by Caledonian » Logged
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the dragon's called Salmacis


« Reply #24 on: October 05, 2015, 08:09:33 am »

Temeraire - heh, there's a series of fantasy books by Naomi Novik where the dragon is named such...Wink


the dragon Temeraire was named after the ship because the dragoneer is a sailor, you can read that in the first book
absolutely loved the books.
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