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Author Topic: The Hound of the Baskervilles (1939, 1959, 1982, and 1988)  (Read 682 times)
GCCC
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« on: October 02, 2015, 11:48:48 am »

Four versions of the Arthur Conan Doyle classic ghost-that-isn't* story, featuring (in order) Basil Rathbone, Peter Cushing, Tom Baker, and Jeremy Brett as the World's First Consulting Detective.

Sherlock Holmes and The Hound of the Baskervilles 1939

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=mLETzw6c1XA

The Hound of the Baskervilles 1959 Full Movie

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=DYZmS9nIAdE

(This embed is for the first episode. Watch it on YouTube and they'll all play automatically.)
1982 Hound of the Baskervilles: episode 1 part 1

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=6tt-K5wuZGs&list=PL975NjlGoHlQINaFJIWAkz3kxzdrqVvsU&index=1

Sherlock Holmes - The Hound of the Baskervilles Full HD movie

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=TwkrJpwNq5Q

So, which of these versions do you prefer, and why?





*"Old man Stapleton!"
"Yeah, and I would've gotten away with it, too, if it weren't for you nosy Baker Street Boys and my stupid dog, too! Whoa! Down, boy! Bad dog! No, not in the quicks...glurp!"
« Last Edit: October 06, 2015, 07:27:23 pm by GCCC » Logged
creagmor
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South Africa South Africa



« Reply #1 on: October 08, 2015, 02:20:42 pm »

For what it's worth, I believe there is a also a version staring Matt Frewer (sp?) of Max Headroom fame. Plus, if I'm not mistaken, this I the film where William Shatner plays Stapleton. BTW, here's a question for you: why is the most remade Holmes story also the one where he gets the least screen time? Charlton Heston was a very good Holmes, but was only in The Crucifer of Blood; a nice twist on The Sign of Four novel, the original being my favourite Holmes storey.      

I've only seen a couple of the versions but my vote goes to the Jeremy Brett version. Among other things this Dr. Watson was the best. My greatest regret is that BBC never did A Study in Scarlet.
« Last Edit: October 08, 2015, 02:23:57 pm by creagmor » Logged

“Love is an emotional thing, and whatever is emotional is opposed to that cold true reason which I place above all things.” Sherlock Holmes, in The Sign of Four.
GCCC
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******
United States United States


« Reply #2 on: October 08, 2015, 09:24:14 pm »

For what it's worth, I believe there is a also a version staring Matt Frewer (sp?) of Max Headroom fame. Plus, if I'm not mistaken, this I the film where William Shatner plays Stapleton. BTW, here's a question for you: why is the most remade Holmes story also the one where he gets the least screen time? Charlton Heston was a very good Holmes, but was only in The Crucifer of Blood; a nice twist on The Sign of Four novel, the original being my favourite Holmes storey.      

I've only seen a couple of the versions but my vote goes to the Jeremy Brett version. Among other things this Dr. Watson was the best. My greatest regret is that BBC never did A Study in Scarlet.

I've not seen it, but Matt Frewer starred as Holmes in the made-for-TV The Hound of the Baskervilles (2000), for CTV Entertainment (Canada). The Shatner version, which I vaguely recall seeing when it aired on television, featured Stewart Granger as Holmes and was released in 1972 by Universal Television.

Actually, the Beeb has done versions of Study, but not with Brett (who unfortunately had a series of severe health problems stemming from the medication given him for severe depression after the death of his wife; you can see how puffy he'd become towards the end of the series). Had Brett lived, we would almost certainly have gotten Study from Granada. The story appears in the well-received Peter Cushing series during its 1968 season for BBC. Prior to that, elements from the story were used in the first episode of the 1954 Ronald Howard BBC series as "The Case of the Cunningham Heritage". More recently, it was loosely adapted for the BBC's Sherlock in 2010 as "A Study in Pink".

I agree; Brett's Watsons (both of them, Hardwicke and Burke) have been truest to the character Doyle wrote, although now Jude Law is giving them a run for the money, with his cheekier (but still true to Doyle's intention) interpretation.

As to the question of why The Hound of the Baskervilles, with the least "screen time" for Holmes, is the most re-made of the original canon? That is a very good question...for which I currently lack a very good answer. I'll have to delve into the matter further, but just spit-balling off the top of my head? I might suggest that this tale is much more of a "thriller" than some of the other tales, with a lot of action sequences set outside the streets of London in the more "exotic" locales of the moors of Dartmoor. From a cinematic standpoint, Hound offers a much more theatrical backdrop in which to set a visual narrative, as opposed to the more "drawing room" type tales typical of the rest of the canon. Plus, it is one of only four full-length novels of the original stories, so it doesn't need as much "padding out" as the short stories.

The second part of that question references Holmes' lack of time center stage. To make a point, I will reference Bram Stoker's classic novel Dracula... The title character only appears onstage, as it were, full-time in the first half of the book. Although he does make appearances in the second half, he is mostly absent...physically. His presence, however, looms large over all the action of the second half. In other words, he's such a bada** he doesn't need to be center stage in the second half. Compare that to Holmes generally, and then specifically in The Hound of the Baskervilles... Unlike Dracula, who only had one book to establish his street cred, Holmes had a whole series of stories to establish his character prior to Hound. We already knew Holmes was a bada** before we even cracked the spine of this book. Like Dracula, Holmes is very center stage during Act I, then is largely absent until the finale in Act III. And yet, his presence looms over all the proceedings, what with Watson constantly referencing his little rubber wristband bearing the legend "WWHD?" and his frequent narrated letters for Holmes. One could, therefore, safely argue that Holmes is indeed present spiritually, if not physically, during the entire novel.

Again, the above is just me spit-balling. Sometime later I'll look into some literary/cinema criticisms to see what answers others have offered for this question, assuming that anyone besides you have even bothered to ask the question before now. We have, somewhere on these boards, a young lady whose handle was "MadMsHolmes", but I believe she's changed it now. She's very learned in all things Sherlockian, and if we can find her she will most likely be able to offer a far better answer than what I've cobbled together so far.
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creagmor
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South Africa South Africa



« Reply #3 on: October 09, 2015, 04:26:57 pm »

Many thanks for your reply. I had no idea that the Matt Frewer version was a made for TV production. Also thanks for refreshing my memory on the Stewart Granger version.

As to your comments on why the Hound is the most remade story, they seem to be most logical. I stumbled across A Study In Pink by accident and thought that it - and the subsequent instalments - were well done, for a modern Holmes story. Much better than Elementary IMHO. The only thing the latter has going for it is that Dr Watson is a woman.

For me a big part of the Holmes thing is the Victorian setting. There are many fictional detectives, but very few, until recently, in the 19th century. At the beginning I did enjoy the Murdoch Mysteries, particularly the way they featured real people (i.e. Thomas Edison),but it soon seemed as though every episode was merely a justification for Murdoch to come up with a new invention. for those of a different viewpoint on this, pray let me quote my late father; "'Every one to their own taste", said the old lady as she kissed her cow."
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