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Author Topic: 56 Delightful Victorian Slang Terms You Should Be Using  (Read 593 times)
GCCC
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« on: July 30, 2015, 03:39:02 am »

Well, the previous list I shared received a general "thumbs-down" from our fact-checkers...Let's see if this one fares any better:

http://mentalfloss.com/article/53529/56-delightful-victorian-slang-terms-you-should-be-using

(I personally call bull-shite on #18 because it just sounds modern to me, but...)

So, verdict(s)...?

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Colonel Hawthorne
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« Reply #1 on: August 05, 2015, 05:50:09 am »

Um.  Better, maybe ...

I agree with your condemnation of 18.  One would never say 'damn' or anything like it in polite society.

21 seems to be related to the term 'to be sold a pup', used at least in these islands (well beyond the 1870s) to indicate a falsehood has been perpetrated on one.

I have heard of 34.  As I remember the story, it dates from the Boer War and the relief of Mafeking, following which there was much celebration in the streets.

42: 'You're off your chump' means 'you're mad', essentially.  Maybe no connection.

Some of the others ('morbs'?) do sound decidedly modern.
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Colonel Sir Julius Hawthorne
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Whatever did we do before retro-futurism?
T. C. Halloway
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« Reply #2 on: August 09, 2015, 02:58:57 am »

In the Chronicles of Narnia, C. S. Lewis is fond of having his young characters call each other a 'brick'. That would make it more 1940's slang, but it does show up in The Magician's Nephew, which is set in the Victorian period. Actually, it may be modern British slang for all I know, but the Chronicles of Narnia is the only place I've heard "brick" or "bricky".
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GCCC
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« Reply #3 on: August 09, 2015, 04:00:44 pm »

In the Chronicles of Narnia, C. S. Lewis is fond of having his young characters call each other a 'brick'. That would make it more 1940's slang, but it does show up in The Magician's Nephew, which is set in the Victorian period. Actually, it may be modern British slang for all I know, but the Chronicles of Narnia is the only place I've heard "brick" or "bricky".

That may very well be. My first encounter with the word as used was in one of the old Doc Savage novellas. An extremely abbreviated search online revealed the term in use through the 1950s, but not when it first was used in that sense.

The main problem with this list is its lack of documentation. As we've discussed above, we're suspicious of the veracity of some of the words/terms on the list.
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Colonel Hawthorne
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« Reply #4 on: August 10, 2015, 01:04:56 am »

'Brick' shows up in Enid Blyton's Famous Five series, so again 40s.

However, the Oxford English Dictionary cites it (with the meaning of 'a good fellow') in works ranging from 1845 to 1870 (eg Tom Brown's Schooldays).  So I think we can accept that one.
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GCCC
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« Reply #5 on: August 10, 2015, 01:13:07 am »

Ah, the good ol' OED...I really am going to have to get the online subscription.
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Colonel Hawthorne
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« Reply #6 on: August 10, 2015, 01:19:33 am »

Yes, it is rather jolly sometimes.  I get access to it (plus newspapers and much more) simply by being a member of our city library.
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