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Author Topic: Somewhere beyond the sea: Nautical life and Steampunk  (Read 700 times)
Stormcat
Officer
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United States United States


Sir Whiskers, Lord High Mouser and Royal lapwarmer


« on: July 23, 2015, 04:38:24 am »

I read 20,000 leagues under the sea and throughly enjoyed it. Maybe because I love sea life so much, maybe because it's a steampunk classic. But I have noticed, Sailing the ocean (or sky) blue seems to be a popular theme in steampunk. Wether it's that octopus pendant seen on every "steampunk" necklace or summoning the deep ones, the briny deep is a popular theme. Frankly, I'd like to figure out why.

Sure, old time sailors had lots of pretty brass instruments, but what is it about the sea that appeals to us steampunks?
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RJBowman
Zeppelin Captain
*****


« Reply #1 on: July 23, 2015, 05:02:07 am »

Steampunk is heavily influenced by Jules Verne, and his best known books are about traveling; often in fanciful large craft such as balloons, submarines, steam-powered elephants, and heavier-than-air flying ships.

And the adventure fiction of the Victorian era, which also influences steampunk, was often about sea voyages.
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GCCC
Zeppelin Admiral
******
United States United States


« Reply #2 on: July 23, 2015, 02:19:25 pm »

I would add that even today we know less about the oceans than we do about almost anywhere else, so just imagine the mystery to those living in the era. For the writers of scientific romances of the day such as Verne and the Steampunks who acknowledge him and his ilk as founding lights, the seas represent adventure and the great unknown.
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Madasasteamfish
A clanger waiting to be dropped......
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Rogue Ætherlord
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United Kingdom United Kingdom


09madasafish
« Reply #3 on: July 23, 2015, 06:12:37 pm »

A lot of people have been drawn to the sea for a variety of reasons over the course of human history, I mean folk songs and stories are full of references and stories of young men (and sometimes women) who have gone to sea (to the point where going to sea was the 18/19th Century equivalent of 'running away to join the circus'). Trying to explain the attraction is nigh impossible, there's a certain je ne ce qouis about it.

Really I think it's that there's a mystery there, but there's also a familiarity, something we know, and when you look at the sea, and the way it changes it's not that hard to see why sailors always compare it to a woman.
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I made a note in my diary on the way over here. Simply says; "Bugger!"

"DON'T THINK OF IT AS DYING, JUST THINK OF IT AS LEAVING EARLY TO AVOID THE RUSH."
Hurricane Annie
Zeppelin Captain
*****
New Zealand New Zealand



« Reply #4 on: July 23, 2015, 10:34:56 pm »

 

 ...It twas on the Good Ship Venus....

   .... By  God  you should have seen us....

 Old punk sea shanty [ traditional]
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J. Wilhelm
╬ Admiral und Luftschiffengel ╬
Board Moderator
Immortal
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United States United States


Sentisne fortunatum punkus? Veni. Diem meum comple


WWW
« Reply #5 on: July 23, 2015, 10:48:42 pm »

Go find yourself in the Sea, mate!  But I suspect the same role applies to military service aboard an airship.  Navigate the Seven Seas and the Hundred Skyes!  Sometimes to escape oppression, like the Luftschiffengel, or seek adventure, for the life is hard and short aboard a ship!
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Madasasteamfish
A clanger waiting to be dropped......
Moderator
Rogue Ætherlord
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United Kingdom United Kingdom


09madasafish
« Reply #6 on: July 23, 2015, 10:50:33 pm »



 ...It twas on the Good Ship Venus....

   .... By  God  you should have seen us....

...The figurehead lay nude in bed (or 'Was a whore in bed')....

...Sucking a red hot....I'll leave the rest to your imagination.  Wink
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Hurricane Annie
Zeppelin Captain
*****
New Zealand New Zealand



« Reply #7 on: July 24, 2015, 07:12:02 am »



 ...It twas on the Good Ship Venus....

   .... By  God  you should have seen us....

...The figurehead lay nude in bed (or 'Was a whore in bed')....

...Sucking a red hot....I'll leave the rest to your imagination.  Wink

 I think there was a God All Mighty   in there some where

 Was it a hymn? ;}
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chironex
Snr. Officer
****
Australia Australia


The typing jellyfish monster


« Reply #8 on: July 25, 2015, 09:55:40 am »

One model of steampunk writing is simply adventure writing, and many adventures can be had at sea.

The more Dickensian model, be it inspired by Dickens or stemming from a retrofit of cyberpunk, is more about grit and class struggle and rebellion and injustice, and a possible character who could be caught up in the mess could well be a sailor, or fisherman, or docker...

Also there is the fact that steam power as transport is most viable either on rails, or at sea. Until tractors and wagons appeared in the late 19th century, the most likely place to see steam power outside of industrial facilities was as a train, canal barge or riverboat, or a ship or launch. The first submersible craft had already appeared by the end of the century (plans for one even became a plot point in a Sherlock Holmes adventure). This incredible new age of discovery and technology brought forth wonders and the submarine vessel was one of those wonders.

Meaning you can have adventure or misdeeds occurring above or below the waves.


http://www.tin-soldier.com/vsfsub1.html
http://www.tin-soldier.com/vsfsub2.html
http://www.tin-soldier.com/vsfsub3.html

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Orkses is never beaten in battle. If we wins we wins and if we dies we dies fightin' so it don't count as beat. Even if we runs away it means we can always come back for anuvver go, see!

QUEENSLAND RAIL NOT FOR SALE!!!!!!
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