The Steampunk Forum at Brass Goggles
December 15, 2017, 08:56:05 pm *
Welcome, Guest. Please login or register.
Did you miss your activation email?

Login with username, password and session length
News: Brassgoggles.co.uk - The Lighter Side Of Steampunk, follow @brasstech for forum technical problems & updates.
 
   Home   Blog Help Rules Login Register  
Pages: [1]   Go Down
  Print  
Author Topic: I need a bit of help here!  (Read 701 times)
Emmline-Topper
Swab

United States United States


« on: June 13, 2015, 02:03:56 am »

I love Steampunk! I buy and make my own clothing and gear, I have made many, many Steamsonas and I will dress up and act out my characters when I am home alone. I just love the entire community, but I don't want to meet strangers over the internet and I have no way to meet other Steampunks in real life! My parents would never let me go out to the conventions and the only time I ever got to show off a character was when we went to a Renaissance fair ONCE, and I was only allowed to wear my gear, not to act out the character. What am I to do? I don't have any friends who like and would willingly act out and make characters with me, I am kind of in a ditch here.  Huh
Logged
Steampunk Away
Zeppelin Captain
*****
United States United States


Long Live The Icarus!

https://twitter.com/Steam
WWW
« Reply #1 on: June 13, 2015, 12:12:43 pm »

Well, there are the very few options I can think of at 7 AM Eastern Standard Time.

1) Write a book to vent your characters. Perhaps an anthology of short stories for each of your personas.

2) Make a short film series with each of them, in costume. Or maybe a Vlog?

3) Have a sit down with your parents and go over the responsibility going to a con can entail.

4) Stick around here for awhile. There are plenty of cool steamy people here who will probably help your steamy creativeness flow.

(I must say however, it is somewhat funny that you do not wish to hang out with people from the internet, then go ask their help. Somewhat funny.)

5) You could try and get you friends into steampunk, form a group, and then try number 1-3 again.

6) Show responsibility (sorry, don't know if you are the punk in steampunk, just putting the idea out there) and then try number 3.

7) If you have a job, raise money to go to a convention yourself, and repeat three.

(Sorry these are all going to three, but it is surprisingly effective - for most people)

Welcome aboard Brass Goggles, we hope you stay awhile. Be sure to introduce yourself in the introduction thread.
Logged

Welcome aboard Steampunk Away! We are a small custom order shop, creating jewelry, props, costumes, drawings, and models. Email us at steampunkaway@gmail.com to have us create your special order on commission! Have a mechanical day!
J. Wilhelm
╬ Admiral und Luftschiffengel ╬
Board Moderator
Immortal
**
United States United States


Sentisne fortunatum punkus? Veni. Diem meum comple


WWW
« Reply #2 on: June 14, 2015, 07:12:26 am »

I'm curious about the idea of your parents allowing you to dress up but not act the part.  Sounds odd to me.  Also I hate to tell you but Steampunk is largely an internet based community. The movement as a whole rose along with the Internet.  In the 1980's it was only a literary genre, but by the start of the Internet in the early 90s. the Goths came in, and then by the turn of the century the Makers joined in as well.  It all happened because of the Internet.  My advice is to figure out a "safe" way to communicate through the Internet.  I don't know how you can get around that other than attending a lot of events, which can be more dangerous and expensive.  I consider Brassgoggles to be one of the safest environments you will find...

Now depending on your age, it is reasonable to expect that the average Steampunk would be older.  Usually when Steampunk starts in a country the age starts between the teenage and the 20-something crowd, and as the Steampunk movement matures (over the years) the older crowd starts joining the movement.  This was true for Europe, Latin America and Japan, and it was the same when Steampunk started to migrate from Literary genre to artistic movent in the English speaking world.

The average age is just a reflection of how developed the movement itself is. In the United States, as in the UK, the movenet is in it's "advanced stage" which means you will see many adults, including grandma and grandpa.

Steampunk is in fact, a very family friendly environment because all ages can participate.  But it depends on the parents to allow the child to participate, and unfortunately that means some kids get to have the fun, while others don't.  If you're lucky. it is not uncommon to have Steampunk parents dressing up and going along with the kids (the best option in my opinion). One has to wonder who the real child is sometimes  Roll Eyes

Depending on local cultural hangups, background, etc., how impossible is it that at least some of your family members would want to participate?
« Last Edit: June 14, 2015, 07:14:36 am by J. Wilhelm » Logged

Aubreay Fallowfield
Snr. Officer
****
United Kingdom United Kingdom



« Reply #3 on: June 14, 2015, 10:52:19 am »

I agree with J. Wilheim and I would like to add that all steampunks are strange but in my experience over the last couple of years there have been no 'nasty strangers' that's not saying that there aren't nasty 'strangers' out there. If you stay at home and don't go anywhere then everyone will be a stranger to you. If you can get them to go with you to a meeting near to where you live. They can then meet the people who themselves are parents and grandparents and who look after new members of their steampunk group. In our group one partner would stand at the side whilst their partner indulged in the steampunk world. Now they are just a member as their partner is.
Logged

Tis' bona to vada your dolly old eke.
frances
Zeppelin Captain
*****
United Kingdom United Kingdom



« Reply #4 on: June 14, 2015, 09:21:12 pm »

I know of a couple of sets of parents who have been dragged into it by enthusiastic children.

So I guess it is number three again.
Logged
Emmline-Topper
Swab

United States United States


« Reply #5 on: June 14, 2015, 10:48:58 pm »

Well, there are the very few options I can think of at 7 AM Eastern Standard Time.

1) Write a book to vent your characters. Perhaps an anthology of short stories for each of your personas.

2) Make a short film series with each of them, in costume. Or maybe a Vlog?

3) Have a sit down with your parents and go over the responsibility going to a con can entail.

4) Stick around here for awhile. There are plenty of cool steamy people here who will probably help your steamy creativeness flow.

(I must say however, it is somewhat funny that you do not wish to hang out with people from the internet, then go ask their help. Somewhat funny.)

5) You could try and get you friends into steampunk, form a group, and then try number 1-3 again.

6) Show responsibility (sorry, don't know if you are the punk in steampunk, just putting the idea out there) and then try number 3.

7) If you have a job, raise money to go to a convention yourself, and repeat three.

(Sorry these are all going to three, but it is surprisingly effective - for most people)

Welcome aboard Brass Goggles, we hope you stay awhile. Be sure to introduce yourself in the introduction thread.

I mean talking to people online, then meeting them in real life! I wouldn't want to do that.
Logged
RJBowman
Zeppelin Captain
*****


« Reply #6 on: June 15, 2015, 12:47:46 am »

I mean talking to people online, then meeting them in real life! I wouldn't want to do that.

A generally good policy for a young person for your own safety.

Eventually, you may want to meet online friends in person, but you should definitely have a parent or trusted friend with you when you do this.
Logged
J. Wilhelm
╬ Admiral und Luftschiffengel ╬
Board Moderator
Immortal
**
United States United States


Sentisne fortunatum punkus? Veni. Diem meum comple


WWW
« Reply #7 on: June 15, 2015, 01:47:20 am »

I mean talking to people online, then meeting them in real life! I wouldn't want to do that.

A generally good policy for a young person for your own safety.

Eventually, you may want to meet online friends in person, but you should definitely have a parent or trusted friend with you when you do this.

I think meeting a new group of people with a guardian or parent is a good idea too.  The trick is to have the family member agree to it, and I believe gathering information about the group members is important.  Is this a club, or a loose group of people.  Generally there will be information available on what kind of people these are, by way of using a bit of Google-Fu and Facebook "detective work."

Where do they hang out?  What other groups to they associate with?  Any identifiable business names that you could contact?  Groups of people in the open leave a lot of traces which reveal who they are.

If a group has family members (daigher-mother, granmother-grandson), them it looking much better for that group of people to be safe.
« Last Edit: June 15, 2015, 01:50:34 am by J. Wilhelm » Logged
henrietta Devereux
Guest
« Reply #8 on: June 15, 2015, 07:09:28 pm »

Absolutely definitely take care talking and meeting people on line. Advice really needs to be directed appropriately. Difficult as you must NEVER divulge age or any other personal details. Decide what it is that attracts you to steampunk. You say none of your current set of friends are into steam punk. Are you really restricted to seeing just that one group? Could you keep your friends and join a school/college/local orienteering/writing/drama group? The wide range of activities involved in putting a theatre production together would give you scope to express yourself and enable your parents to ensure you are safe.

Always ensure your parents know who you are with and where you are.
Logged
CPT_J_Percell
Moderator
Zeppelin Captain
*
England England


The werewolf Airship Captain.


WWW
« Reply #9 on: June 15, 2015, 08:25:35 pm »

You quite lucky that there are so many in the US and by reading the forums you have already met some.
Find the local group and arrange for a meet up, I don't know about the US but the majority of clubs near me have a vast majority of caring over 50's that run them.

My vote goes out to the writing scene.
Never fear what others think of what you write about as there will always be haters. White it up post it here and I'm sure someone will help take your raw crystal and help make it a diamond.

Failing that, come join the portrayal groups, there is always a space for other players.

However, once important things, the most seriously important thing.
Tell us about your character!
Logged

I suffer from a random misfiring synapse and a bad case of wolfen the turns me into a seven-foot-tall werewolf or a seven-foot great wolf!
https://dragon-rehoming-centre.myshopify.com/
http://purbry.wordpress.com
Pages: [1]   Go Up
  Print  
 
Jump to:  

Powered by MySQL Powered by PHP Powered by SMF 1.1.20 | SMF © 2013, Simple Machines Valid XHTML 1.0! Valid CSS!
Page created in 0.202 seconds with 15 queries.