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Author Topic: Dieselpunk and Atompunk Books ??[ non fiction ]  (Read 909 times)
Hurricane Annie
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« on: May 18, 2015, 06:40:35 am »


 I am looking for interesting non fiction book titles  of these and similar genre to read and order off my local library catalogue.  The library website has a section for suggestions for purchase  , I can  enter book titles through this  system if they don't have them in stock.


 Life style, art, cooking, fashion, projects, decor, etc

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J. Wilhelm
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« Reply #1 on: May 18, 2015, 07:07:47 am »

I'm going to make an unusual suggestion. Something we Steamnpunks are guilty of neglecting: Music. History of Jazz to be precise. You'll find many college level textbooks too. Why? Because Jazz spans almost the entire 20th. C., is deeply rooted in history,and it also inspired and followed fashion and architecture.  Big Band Jazz (1920s-40s Dieselpunk), Bebop (1940s-50s Dieselpunk), Cool Jazz (1950s-60s Atompunk).
http://books.wwnorton.com/books/detail.aspx?ID=12187

Also books on decoration and achitecture:

Art Deco (1920s-30s, Dieselpunk):
http://www.barnesandnoble.com/listing/2671823129841?r=1&kpid=2671823129841&cm_mmc=GooglePLA-_-Book_45Up-_-Q000000633-_-2671823129841

Books on history with photos:

Space Age History (1960s-1970s, Atompunk).  Some of these books are great for the images on primitive Space Age tech and aesthetics -from the real-world perspective. So much of Aerospace Engineering takes ypu right into the heart of the Cold War, and associated aesthetics.
http://www.barnesandnoble.com/w/live-from-cape-canaveral-jay-barbree/1110764421?ean=9780061233937

Also some of the greatest Space Age (Atompunk) pictures I have ever seen, were printed in Time-Life's Life Nature Library and Life Science Library, two illustrated encyclopaedias that were originally printed in the early 1960s.  They are absolutely chock-full of vivid colour pictures showing both, state of the art technology of the era as well as fashion, and graphic aesthetics fro the 1960s.  Also includes properly outdated science knowledge of the era.  When science was sufficiently advanced to make it 100% believable, yet it is still filled with some mystery of the unknown.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Life_Nature_Library
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Life_Science_Library






« Last Edit: May 18, 2015, 07:15:05 am by J. Wilhelm » Logged

Hurricane Annie
Zeppelin Captain
*****
New Zealand New Zealand



« Reply #2 on: May 18, 2015, 07:38:41 am »

 

Thanks. I will check those out for inspiration.

 They will be a good start on my literary journey.   [ and keep the librarians busy and wondering what tangent I am on now  Cool ]
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VampirateMace
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Mein Hexapod


« Reply #3 on: May 20, 2015, 06:01:56 pm »

I don't have much for non-fiction suggestions. But I'm going to post, because I want to be notified, so I can see what other Atompunk stuff comes up.

There was a mail-order binder set (Secrets of the Universe, 90s), that had a space travel history section, though I doubt it'll be in your library.
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Hurricane Annie
Zeppelin Captain
*****
New Zealand New Zealand



« Reply #4 on: May 20, 2015, 07:13:00 pm »

I don't have much for non-fiction suggestions. But I'm going to post, because I want to be notified, so I can see what other Atompunk stuff comes up.

There was a mail-order binder set (Secrets of the Universe, 90s), that had a space travel history section, though I doubt it'll be in your library.

 One never knows where these obscure gems pops up. I may start scouring the op shops for it  or something similar.

 I  tried to suggest purchase some books  and the library was willing , but their [ supplier said they were unavailable] . at least though they will know there is an interest out there in the aether,

 am waiting for  1 book from the library.
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J. Wilhelm
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« Reply #5 on: May 20, 2015, 07:44:40 pm »

The best advice I can give, is read historical accounts.  History of technology, history of the Cold War, , architectural history, historical pictures, even family portraits and so on.  The aesthetics and tehnical detail are right there in front of you.  The text is applying your imagination to rewrite history.
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Hurricane Annie
Zeppelin Captain
*****
New Zealand New Zealand



« Reply #6 on: May 21, 2015, 12:12:38 am »



a selection  of the books I currently have on order from  the local Auckland library [ along with 100 others ]

http://www.syndetics.com/index.aspx?isbn=9781451660432/summary.html&client=elgar&type=hw7&popup=no

http://www.syndetics.com/index.aspx?isbn=9781771620338/summary.html&client=elgar&type=hw7&popup=no

http://www.syndetics.com/index.aspx?isbn=9780226242798/summary.html&client=elgar&type=hw7&popup=no



http://www.syndetics.com/index.aspx?isbn=9781909051096/summary.html&client=elgar&type=hw7&popup=no

http://www.syndetics.com/index.aspx?isbn=9781847971616/summary.html&client=elgar&type=hw7&popup=no
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Hurricane Annie
Zeppelin Captain
*****
New Zealand New Zealand



« Reply #7 on: May 21, 2015, 12:19:23 am »

I'm going to make an unusual suggestion. Something we Steamnpunks are guilty of neglecting: Music. History of Jazz to be precise. You'll find many college level textbooks too. Why? Because Jazz spans almost the entire 20th. C., is deeply rooted in history,and it also inspired and followed fashion and architecture.  Big Band Jazz (1920s-40s Dieselpunk), Bebop (1940s-50s Dieselpunk), Cool Jazz (1950s-60s Atompunk).
http://books.wwnorton.com/books/detail.aspx?ID=12187

Also books on decoration and achitecture:

Art Deco (1920s-30s, Dieselpunk):
http://www.barnesandnoble.com/listing/2671823129841?r=1&kpid=2671823129841&cm_mmc=GooglePLA-_-Book_45Up-_-Q000000633-_-2671823129841

Books on history with photos:

Space Age History (1960s-1970s, Atompunk).  Some of these books are great for the images on primitive Space Age tech and aesthetics -from the real-world perspective. So much of Aerospace Engineering takes ypu right into the heart of the Cold War, and associated aesthetics.
http://www.barnesandnoble.com/w/live-from-cape-canaveral-jay-barbree/1110764421?ean=9780061233937

Also some of the greatest Space Age (Atompunk) pictures I have ever seen, were printed in Time-Life's Life Nature Library and Life Science Library, two illustrated encyclopaedias that were originally printed in the early 1960s.  They are absolutely chock-full of vivid colour pictures showing both, state of the art technology of the era as well as fashion, and graphic aesthetics fro the 1960s.  Also includes properly outdated science knowledge of the era.  When science was sufficiently advanced to make it 100% believable, yet it is still filled with some mystery of the unknown.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Life_Nature_Library
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Life_Science_Library









 I found all these in  the library system and have added them to my  extensive list of requests.

 a younger member of the family may have   some of those Time Life  books or similar  retro collections. They are science/nature  collection volumes from that era.
« Last Edit: May 21, 2015, 12:22:33 am by Hurricane Annie » Logged
J. Wilhelm
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« Reply #8 on: May 21, 2015, 08:45:57 pm »

I'm going to make an unusual suggestion. Something we Steamnpunks are guilty of neglecting: Music. History of Jazz to be precise. You'll find many college level textbooks too. Why? Because Jazz spans almost the entire 20th. C., is deeply rooted in history,and it also inspired and followed fashion and architecture.  Big Band Jazz (1920s-40s Dieselpunk), Bebop (1940s-50s Dieselpunk), Cool Jazz (1950s-60s Atompunk).
http://books.wwnorton.com/books/detail.aspx?ID=12187

Also books on decoration and achitecture:

Art Deco (1920s-30s, Dieselpunk):
http://www.barnesandnoble.com/listing/2671823129841?r=1&kpid=2671823129841&cm_mmc=GooglePLA-_-Book_45Up-_-Q000000633-_-2671823129841

Books on history with photos:

Space Age History (1960s-1970s, Atompunk).  Some of these books are great for the images on primitive Space Age tech and aesthetics -from the real-world perspective. So much of Aerospace Engineering takes ypu right into the heart of the Cold War, and associated aesthetics.
http://www.barnesandnoble.com/w/live-from-cape-canaveral-jay-barbree/1110764421?ean=9780061233937

Also some of the greatest Space Age (Atompunk) pictures I have ever seen, were printed in Time-Life's Life Nature Library and Life Science Library, two illustrated encyclopaedias that were originally printed in the early 1960s.  They are absolutely chock-full of vivid colour pictures showing both, state of the art technology of the era as well as fashion, and graphic aesthetics fro the 1960s.  Also includes properly outdated science knowledge of the era.  When science was sufficiently advanced to make it 100% believable, yet it is still filled with some mystery of the unknown.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Life_Nature_Library
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Life_Science_Library


 I found all these in  the library system and have added them to my  extensive list of requests.

 a younger member of the family may have   some of those Time Life  books or similar  retro collections. They are science/nature  collection volumes from that era.


What I like about these are the magazine size glossy photos.  Being published by Time Life they had a very good set of photographs used for their magazine articles.  I don't know if they're still publishing, but every household with children should have one of these.  These materials were a jewel of information.  I remember the "Flight" tome.  Also the Space tome.  Absolutely fantastic. The latter two show the golden age of Aerospace and the Space age. Science and technology was already very advanced by the 1960s and that makes the tomes even more interesting. I wanted to be a pilot, but an injury prevented that. There was enough info in that book to convince me to go to college and study engineering.

Other tomes that are fantastic are the "Matter" tome, "The Cell" tome, and "The Body" tome.  Great pictures from the develoment of the atom bomb, for example. 
« Last Edit: May 21, 2015, 09:36:02 pm by J. Wilhelm » Logged
Hurricane Annie
Zeppelin Captain
*****
New Zealand New Zealand



« Reply #9 on: May 21, 2015, 10:32:20 pm »



 I believe Time Life are still publishing books with superb photographs .  Though the subject matter may be getting a little fluffy.
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J. Wilhelm
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« Reply #10 on: May 22, 2015, 02:45:47 am »



 I believe Time Life are still publishing books with superb photographs .  Though the subject matter may be getting a little fluffy.

The quality of the 1960s series was so different.  Just read the names of the authors of each tome!

From https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Life_Science_Library
Quote
Each volume was written by a primary author or authors, "and the Editors of LIFE". These are the twenty-six volumes in the series:

Man and Space (1964), by Arthur C. Clarke
Planets (1966), by Carl Sagan and Jonathan Norton Leonard

The Sound and Hearing tome was particularly interesting, because it was written by S S Stevens, an authority in a very esoteric subject known as "Psychoacoustics." Basically it's a mishmash combining physics, mathematics and psychology.  You can count the number of renowned scientists working on Psychoacoustics with the fingers in one of your hands.  Some of the material is very much graduate level science, and many years later in college, I found myself re-reading the tome when I was developing a 3-D sound device as a personal project of mine (I discovered the subject because the Aerospace industry and NASA had a hand at developing 3-D sound, research Hughes Aerospace "Sound Retrieval System" and NASA's "Convolvotron" (none of this to be confused with Dolby Surround which is basically 2-D nor it's precurson, Quadraphonic sound).
« Last Edit: May 22, 2015, 02:54:01 am by J. Wilhelm » Logged
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