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Author Topic: More Antiquated Words.....  (Read 745 times)
chicar
Rogue Ætherlord
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Canada Canada


Student in Techno-Shamanism and Lyncanthrope

Chicar556
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« on: April 05, 2015, 12:27:30 am »

The dictionary of the old days keep going bigger and bigger:
http://www.buzzfeed.com/lukelewis/27-delightful-obsolete-words-its-high-time-we-revived#.ceVAAw12G
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The word pagan came from paganus , who mean peasant . Its was a way to significate than christianism was the religion of the elite and paganism the one of the savage worker class.

''Trickster shows us how we trick OURSELVES. Her rampant curiosity backfires, but, then, something NEW is discovered (though usually not what She expected)! This is where creativity comes from—experiment, do something different, maybe even something forbidden, and voila! A breakthrough occurs! Ha! Ha! We are released! The world is created anew! Do something backwards, break your own traditions, the barrier breaks; destroy the world as you know it, let the new in.''
Extract of the Dreamflesh article ''Path of The Sacred Clown''
Will Howard
Zeppelin Admiral
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United States United States



« Reply #1 on: April 05, 2015, 03:11:54 pm »

Twenty two of these were unknown to me, but I actually know (and occasionally use) five of them.  Enough twattle...
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"I'm a Barbarian by choice, not ancestry..."
Damnd of Hell
Gunner
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« Reply #2 on: April 06, 2015, 03:10:57 am »

Excellent!!!
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Your Hell, is my paradise.
Rory B Esq BSc
Snr. Officer
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United Kingdom United Kingdom


« Reply #3 on: April 08, 2015, 02:57:05 pm »

reminds me of how many words only exist in common useage as the negative.... Kempt, Couth and so on.... food is incretia (as opposed to excretia) as it increases your weight.
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Will Howard
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United States United States



« Reply #4 on: April 08, 2015, 07:35:50 pm »

reminds me of how many words only exist in common useage as the negative.... Kempt, Couth and so on.... food is incretia (as opposed to excretia) as it increases your weight.

Add "ruth" to that- currently used only in the negative("ruthless") or as a name.  Wonder how many Ruths know that their name means "pity" or "compassion"?
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Will Howard
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« Reply #5 on: April 08, 2015, 07:38:33 pm »

To swallow is to "gurgitate" (pass over the gorge or throat).  If it passes through the throat a second time, going the other way, you "regurgitate".
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Fairley B. Strange
Zeppelin Overlord
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Australia Australia


Relax, I've done much dumber things and survived..


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« Reply #6 on: April 08, 2015, 10:19:57 pm »

It is so difficult these days to keep oneself -ert, be -ept, and be sure to have one's post -ane.

The other underused word in that list was the wonderful "calliphygian" - as a term of appreciation , I believe it should be able to be used more often.

Actually it would make a splendid persona name for any bustle-wearing lass: Miss Callie Phygian    Grin
« Last Edit: April 08, 2015, 10:26:05 pm by Fairley B. Strange » Logged

Choose a code to live by, die by it if you have to.
Steerpike
Officer
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« Reply #7 on: April 09, 2015, 06:07:37 pm »

A few I like:
Hogo :a foul stench
Mundungus :a derogatory term for foul, low quality tobacco (apparently from a spanish dialect word for tripe)
Gongoozler :an idler, particularly one who hangs around canal locks.
Mopery : an imaginary crime or misdemeanor (often defined as "indecently exposing oneself to a blind person") used by lawyers as a "placeholder" offence when discussing cases, and by unscrupulous police officers as a means of harassing "undesirables"!
and my favourite:
Petrichor :the distinctive smell which rises when it first rains after a dry spell.
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pakled
Zeppelin Captain
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United States United States


Minions Local 305, at your thervice!


« Reply #8 on: April 10, 2015, 06:28:07 am »

The lump of food you swallow is a 'bolus', though I'm not sure if that's just obscure, or antiquated...Wink
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chicar
Rogue Ætherlord
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Canada Canada


Student in Techno-Shamanism and Lyncanthrope

Chicar556
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« Reply #9 on: April 13, 2015, 11:27:06 pm »

50 Old British Dialect Words to Incorporate into Conversation :
http://mentalfloss.com/article/59924/50-old-british-dialect-words-incorporate-conversation
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Lady Writer
Swab

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evadeverell
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« Reply #10 on: April 20, 2015, 06:05:29 am »

What splendid words!
There is a book I often make use of on Archive.org called, Passing English of the Victorian Era: https://archive.org/details/passingenglishof00wareuoft

It's particularly rich in phrases & offers some very amusing descriptions.

Here are a few of my favourites:

Electrate (1890 on). to describe locomotion by electricity. Electrate is one of the recently-invented verbs to express the new mode of locomotion, to which the words sail and steam are inapplicable.
Scrunging - stealing unripe apples and pears - probably from the noise made in masticating.
Bull - a teapot with the leaves left in for a second brew.
Mervousness - satirical synonym for nervousness invented about 1876 by the political party who did not believe in the advance of Russia towards India.
Beweep (1898) - a new form of 'weep' brought in by the Tzar of Russia (20th May 1898) in a telegram referring to the death of W. E. Gladstone. It took the fashion at once.
Rortyness - vitality.
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SeVeNeVeS
Immortal
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England England



« Reply #11 on: April 20, 2015, 06:44:08 am »


Scrunging - stealing unripe apples and pears - probably from the noise made in masticating.


I thought that was scrumping Undecided
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Lady Writer
Swab

United Kingdom United Kingdom


evadeverell
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« Reply #12 on: April 20, 2015, 07:57:00 am »

I thought that was scrumping Undecided


The OED lists the Passing English entry under "scrounge", interestingly, but "scrump" does seem more correct!
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SeVeNeVeS
Immortal
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England England



« Reply #13 on: April 20, 2015, 08:13:45 am »

Maybe a connection with scrumpy cider Obviously made from apples. Undecided

Anyway, all that aside welcome to BG
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Miss Indigo Darling
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Adventuress


« Reply #14 on: April 20, 2015, 03:11:39 pm »

Costermonger. Definitely deserves reviving!


Costermonger: Street seller of vegetables and fruit. Cart seller. Mobile grocer.
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"Of all the fishes in the sea, my favourite is the bass. He climbs up on the tall sea weed, and slides down on his hands and knees."
Lady Writer
Swab

United Kingdom United Kingdom


evadeverell
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« Reply #15 on: April 20, 2015, 04:45:21 pm »

Anyway, all that aside welcome to BG

Thank you! I have lurked for a while; not sure why I didn't join until now. Smiley

Costermonger. Definitely deserves reviving!

This brings us back to apples! "Costermonger" is derived from "costard" which was a type of apple. Smiley
Costermongers were a breed unto themselves. If you're interested, I highly recommend reading about them in Henry Mayhew's London Labour and the London Poor. His descriptions and writing style are very engaging.
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SeVeNeVeS
Immortal
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England England



« Reply #16 on: April 20, 2015, 05:00:35 pm »

Rapscallions and/or a ne'er–do–well would be scrumping them thar apples from the Costermonger's orchard then  Grin
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greensteam
Zeppelin Captain
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United Kingdom United Kingdom


Steamed up from birth


« Reply #17 on: April 20, 2015, 08:00:32 pm »



Of that list, I think Hugggermugger is the only one I have used in ordinary conversation.

However, Cockalorum caught my eye as I associate it with this old fairy tale http://www.sacred-texts.com/neu/eng/eft/eft43.htm  that I remember well from childhood. In that story Hot Cockalorum is the required substitute for the word "fire".
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So it's every hand to his rope or gun, quick's the word and sharp's the action. After all... Surprise is on our side.
BrethrenAndBetrayer
Snr. Officer
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Ireland, Republic of Ireland, Republic of



« Reply #18 on: April 23, 2015, 02:41:44 pm »

I was just reading a translation of some excerpts of The Courtier and was delighted to see the word 'Unpossible' in amongst the rest.

In regards Gurgitate, etc., I'm reasonably certain that the word 'gruntled' exists.
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You know its gonna be a good session when the tech priest rides into battle on the back of a gun-servitor.

There is an extra gear in The Great Machine of the cosmos tonight.
In memory of Richard 'Datamancer' Nagy - 2013
Miss Indigo Darling
Officer
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United States United States


Adventuress


« Reply #19 on: April 23, 2015, 04:20:15 pm »

However, Cockalorum caught my eye as I associate it with this old fairy tale http://www.sacred-texts.com/neu/eng/eft/eft43.htm  that I remember well from childhood. In that story Hot Cockalorum is the required substitute for the word "fire".


I remember that one too! It's been a long time since I've encountered that old tale.  I remember my Aunt Bessie reading it to me when I was little.  Thanks for the link!
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