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Author Topic: Made an interesting observation  (Read 887 times)
Dr. Madd
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« on: January 25, 2015, 08:39:21 am »

My wife tends to love the fifties stuff- House of the future kind of thing. The Poodle skirt, apron, muted pastels and streamlining of the 1950's.

While I prefer the age of steam, with a little stone age thrown in for good measure, I think women's styles are more attractive in 1920's 30's, 40's, 50's styles.

Anyone else see that. I'd much prefer my wife in a 1950's housewife outfit or a 1920's flapper, 1930's gun moll or 1940's Rosie the Riveter type deal or even something futuristic- Buck Rogers type stuff. Barring that, maybe full on prehistoric.

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Miranda.T
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« Reply #1 on: January 25, 2015, 12:49:09 pm »

My wife tends to love the fifties stuff- House of the future kind of thing. The Poodle skirt, apron, muted pastels and streamlining of the 1950's.

While I prefer the age of steam, with a little stone age thrown in for good measure, I think women's styles are more attractive in 1920's 30's, 40's, 50's styles.

Anyone else see that. I'd much prefer my wife in a 1950's housewife outfit or a 1920's flapper, 1930's gun moll or 1940's Rosie the Riveter type deal or even something futuristic- Buck Rogers type stuff. Barring that, maybe full on prehistoric.



I have to agree the late 40s\early 50s style could be utterly glamourous; the Dior New Look and so forth. Whilst we have a plethora of 40s events in the UK there have been far fewer opportunies to induge in the 50s look, although there do seem to be more 'vintage' events popping up in the last few years (unfortunately often incorporating air shows and road racing events, and as a result very expensive to gain entry to). In terms of general aestetic I have always found the 'streamlined' art deco look of the 30s, which was reinvented in the 50s as 'space age' styling to be very appealing.

Yours,
Miranda.
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Atterton
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« Reply #2 on: January 25, 2015, 01:16:22 pm »

I feel that fashion peaked in the 30s and 40s. For example for women, the clothes was not too puritan but also not too sexualized. You also didn't need to wear 10 kg of clothing. I don't care as much for the 50s look though. My experience is different to that of Miranda T. though. Few are interested in the 30s and 40s here, while the 50s is really big. Rockabilly and such is common, and there's meet ups for people with cadillacs and similar cars.
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Miranda.T
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« Reply #3 on: January 25, 2015, 02:28:01 pm »

I feel that fashion peaked in the 30s and 40s. For example for women, the clothes was not too puritan but also not too sexualized. You also didn't need to wear 10 kg of clothing. I don't care as much for the 50s look though. My experience is different to that of Miranda T. though. Few are interested in the 30s and 40s here, while the 50s is really big. Rockabilly and such is common, and there's meet ups for people with cadillacs and similar cars.

Ah, yes, there are some Rockabilly meetings here, but they seem to be adult events so not so good with the children in tow, and I think I'm a little to old now for energetic rock-and-roll dancing... Beside, for me personally it is more the 'New Look' side of 50s style rather than the rock-and-roll aesthetic (although saying that, many moons ago, before children, we and some friends did make and don rock-and-roll outfits to jive around Manchetser on the back of a float as past of a parade).

Yes, the 30s/40s hollywood style was very beguiling too, bias-cut dresses and superbly fitted skirts and jackets in all those b&w film-noirs.

Yours,
Miranda.
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J. Wilhelm
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« Reply #4 on: January 25, 2015, 09:47:03 pm »

It's an interesting export that we have made.  It is worthy of mention that Rockabilly is a recurring trend in the US, more or less recurring every decade or so.

1980s Rockabilly: John Mellencamp "Pink Houses"


In the 1980s there was a sudden interest in the 1950s, and Rockabilly tagged along, with names like John "Cougar" Mellencamp and Rick Sprigfield.

In the 1990s we had a strong surge in 1950's retro "Betty Page" / Burlesque look and I suspect that is the origin of the trends in the UK in the last decade, as well as the Rockabilly in Europe.

Also is like to note that most people make the mistake of thinking that there was a sharp transition between the Diesel 1940s and the Atomic 1950s.  There was not.

Poodle skirts were popularized in the 1940s along with Zoot Suits, but the latter died after WWII, while the former (poodle skirts abd bobby socks) continued to the Rock and Roll period.  The Zoot Suit was maintained alive in Mexico along with the Cuban-Mexican version of Big Band music, the Mambo.

Early 1950s Mambo (Cuban-Mexican Big Band music). Perez Prado's Orchestra plays "Dancing Pachuco" See the poodle skirts and Zoot Suits?


Here in Austin, you will find like in many parts of the US that Rockabilly is almost culturally native (along with a "Blues Brothers type of culture).  So it's natural that in the retro 1990s some rediscovery of this transitional period would occur.

We have for example "Country Swing" which is in fact a transitional style between Country and Swing.  You can hear that music from the likes of Lyle Lovett (probably the only kind of Country music my ears can stand), and which you will hear in events like Austin City Limits. I wonder if along Rock and Roll, our European counterparts would be interested in playing this "transitional" Swing, in their Cadillacs, which would fit right in with their black bangs, skinny pants, bright red lips and long fake eyelashes.

Even if it doesn't seem so at first glance, it is in fact the way that pop culture developed.  Rock and Roll, Country and Swing blended and coexisted in that period.

Country Swing.  Lyle Lovett's " You're Not From Texas"
« Last Edit: January 25, 2015, 10:23:22 pm by J. Wilhelm » Logged

Hurricane Annie
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« Reply #5 on: January 25, 2015, 09:51:19 pm »


 Rockabilly is gaining momentum in NZ , mainly connected with the classic car scene.  Sadly it seems to be more about the ladies' tattoos than the fashion.

The  reenactment clubs  from the  world wars  and medieval times have a keen growing following .   Military influenced fashions for men and women are always popular here.  Though it often means Doc martens and baggy Khaki for both genders

          Bu there is always hope !

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J. Wilhelm
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« Reply #6 on: January 25, 2015, 09:55:58 pm »

(Sorry for the double post). On the other hand as offers on Brassgoggles will attest I have a strong predilection for Jazz Era 1920s look.  Women wearing the "Shingle Bob" drive me crazy and that look was the basis for the American version of the Goth look in the 1990s and later decades.  Flappers were always sexy but I must note that was an androgynous gender-bending look meant to have women be "boyish" and hang around with the men (details in the history of that to be found at the Queer Geer, http://brassgoggles.co.uk/forum/index.php/topic,20391.msg921706.html#msg921706)

Actress Louise Brooks sports a "Shingle Bob" with bangs, long sides and a tapering profile in the back cut very short  at the nape of the neck.
« Last Edit: January 25, 2015, 10:20:14 pm by J. Wilhelm » Logged
J. Wilhelm
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« Reply #7 on: January 25, 2015, 09:58:25 pm »


 Rockabilly is gaining momentum in NZ , mainly connected with the classic car scene.  Sadly it seems to be more about the ladies' tattoos than the fashion.

The  reenactment clubs  from the  world wars  and medieval times have a keen growing following .   Military influenced fashions for men and women are always popular here.  Though it often means Doc martens and baggy Khaki for both genders

          Bu there is always hope !


Eventually it will all get pulled together, but fashions can take decades to cross the Ocean.  That Betty Page thing took more than 15 years before crossing the pond...
« Last Edit: January 25, 2015, 10:13:55 pm by J. Wilhelm » Logged
Hurricane Annie
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« Reply #8 on: January 25, 2015, 10:12:59 pm »


 Rockabilly is gaining momentum in NZ , mainly connected with the classic car scene.  Sadly it seems to be more about the ladies' tattoos than the fashion.

The  reenactment clubs  from the  world wars  and medieval times have a keen growing following .   Military influenced fashions for men and women are always popular here.  Though it often means Doc martens and baggy Khaki for both genders

          Bu there is always hope !

Eventually it will all get pulled together, but fashions can take decades to cross the Ocean.  That Betty Page thing took more than 15 years before crossing the pond...

 NZ is a quirky little place on our isolated islands with a small population.  Punk  took off here in the 70s ,  as did the G n R / hair metal  look in the late 80s/90s { some men haven't given it up despite the well receded hairlines}

 Other fashion  and social trends  though  go straight over our heads for years until  something comes up  on TV  or in a week end paper - and we are away....

 Steampunk is  creeping its way in here, with events ,  fashion and interior decor.
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J. Wilhelm
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« Reply #9 on: January 25, 2015, 10:37:53 pm »


 Rockabilly is gaining momentum in NZ , mainly connected with the classic car scene.  Sadly it seems to be more about the ladies' tattoos than the fashion.

The  reenactment clubs  from the  world wars  and medieval times have a keen growing following .   Military influenced fashions for men and women are always popular here.  Though it often means Doc martens and baggy Khaki for both genders

          Bu there is always hope !

Eventually it will all get pulled together, but fashions can take decades to cross the Ocean.  That Betty Page thing took more than 15 years before crossing the pond...

 NZ is a quirky little place on our isolated islands with a small population.  Punk  took off here in the 70s ,  as did the G n R / hair metal  look in the late 80s/90s { some men haven't given it up despite the well receded hairlines}

 Other fashion  and social trends  though  go straight over our heads for years until  something comes up  on TV  or in a week end paper - and we are away....

 Steampunk is  creeping its way in here, with events ,  fashion and interior decor.

I wish I could teleport you down to Austin, for BBQ dinner at "The County Line" (the rockabilliest restaurant I know), and then go to see the classic cars downtown at The Continental Club on South Congress. 
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Hurricane Annie
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« Reply #10 on: January 26, 2015, 12:48:39 am »


 Rockabilly is gaining momentum in NZ , mainly connected with the classic car scene.  Sadly it seems to be more about the ladies' tattoos than the fashion.

The  reenactment clubs  from the  world wars  and medieval times have a keen growing following .   Military influenced fashions for men and women are always popular here.  Though it often means Doc martens and baggy Khaki for both genders

          Bu there is always hope !

Eventually it will all get pulled together, but fashions can take decades to cross the Ocean.  That Betty Page thing took more than 15 years before crossing the pond...

 NZ is a quirky little place on our isolated islands with a small population.  Punk  took off here in the 70s ,  as did the G n R / hair metal  look in the late 80s/90s { some men haven't given it up despite the well receded hairlines}

 Other fashion  and social trends  though  go straight over our heads for years until  something comes up  on TV  or in a week end paper - and we are away....

 Steampunk is  creeping its way in here, with events ,  fashion and interior decor.

I wish I could teleport you down to Austin, for BBQ dinner at "The County Line" (the rockabilliest restaurant I know), and then go to see the classic cars downtown at The Continental Club on South Congress. 

 One day I will have to teleport myself down there  to check out some of the Austin hot spots -
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Atterton
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« Reply #11 on: January 26, 2015, 01:20:41 am »

Here it's more than a fleeting fashion. There's a subculture called raggare who have done the rockabilly thing, or what you want to call it, for decades.
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J. Wilhelm
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« Reply #12 on: January 26, 2015, 01:55:04 am »

You are going to need "diners" and hamburger joints to go along with your Cadillacs.  It's very much a part of the US "highway culture" to have eateries peppered along the road, so you can get your hamburger, greasy fries (chips) and Apple Pie... Back to the days when they brought your food to your car on roller skates, and before McDonalds was even a known name.


http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Diner
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Atterton
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« Reply #13 on: January 26, 2015, 01:58:47 am »

There's a few of them. In Ireland there's a chain of such diners called Eddie Rocket's.
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J. Wilhelm
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« Reply #14 on: January 26, 2015, 02:11:45 am »

There was a really interesting 1993 documentary series about Diners on the Public Broadcasting Station, "Pennsylvania Diners & Other Roadside Restaurants."  I'm not sure if you can see that (apparently licensing issues between BBC and BBC America makes it impossible for me to even share BBC TV clips - I'm hoping no such barrier exists for the publicly funded PBS network).  Hamburger joints are a 1950's thing, but diners go back to the 1930s and are very numerous in the North East of the USA.

Pennsylvania Diners & Other Roadside Restaurants
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pennsylvania_Diners_and_Other_Roadside_Restaurants
http://www.smavideo.com/store/titledetail.cfm?MerchID=92594
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« Reply #15 on: January 28, 2015, 06:33:14 pm »

One of my very good friends absolutely loves it when her town has a 1940's weekend, and she does look good with her hair done up and dancing to Glenn Miller at the local preserved railway.
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chironex
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« Reply #16 on: January 31, 2015, 12:41:58 pm »

You are going to need "diners" and hamburger joints to go along with your Cadillacs.  It's very much a part of the US "highway culture" to have eateries peppered along the road, so you can get your hamburger, greasy fries (chips) and Apple Pie... Back to the days when they brought your food to your car on roller skates, and before McDonalds was even a known name.


http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Diner


The December issue of Dollshouse and Miniature Scene magazine has part of an ongoing series for constructing just such a location.

There is also a store around the corner from my place where you can get some of the fashions. Occasionally a fitting vehicle may be parked out the front, but in Australia, it seems muscle and pickups are the more common classic American vehicles. Ignore the shop further down the road that sells 70's clutter...

Also one can't help but notice some swimwear designer's fascination for full-brief bikinis, obviously designed to echo such designs made famous in the 1950s. Can't say I'm terribly displeased, either, because there is very little else available that doesn't hang around the hips instead of the waist, making it appear that everyone at the seaside is drunk. The more common 1960s/70s throwbacks just look that butt-ugly.
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J. Wilhelm
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« Reply #17 on: February 01, 2015, 08:17:04 am »

And of course, you need a road to travel.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/U.S._Route_66

Chuck Berry Route 66


« Last Edit: February 01, 2015, 08:33:03 am by J. Wilhelm » Logged
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