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Author Topic: Steampunk Conservatory or Green House - Your Personal Dream Jungle  (Read 4011 times)
Maets
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« Reply #25 on: January 26, 2015, 11:22:28 pm »

On a very tiny scale, here is my stair way.  The ponds give a nice sound and the three gold fish a little of the outdoors, even when it is snowing as it is today.

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Hurricane Annie
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« Reply #26 on: January 26, 2015, 11:26:24 pm »

That is a priceless piece of retro installation. It is criminal when people take such features out of homes. Long live the indoor garden !
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Colonel Hawthorne
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« Reply #27 on: January 27, 2015, 12:24:38 am »

I'm also rather fond of the municipal wintergarden/begonia house.  They make a good venue for a steampunk excursion, as long as certain precautions against triffids are taken:

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« Reply #28 on: January 27, 2015, 06:44:27 am »

I'm also rather fond of the municipal wintergarden/begonia house.  They make a good venue for a steampunk excursion, as long as certain precautions against triffids are taken:




Your glamorous assistant was save in the nick of time
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chironex
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« Reply #29 on: January 31, 2015, 12:07:45 pm »

I am deeply in tune with the way this thread is pointing!

Being a London boy of the fifties/sixties, my playgrounds were the bomb sites which I could almost walk through from central London out to Epping forest in Essex only crossing the occasional road with smashed buildings all the way. About ten to fifteen miles of dereliction. The last of these bomb sites were only finally built over in the nineteen eighties 40 years after the war. So I presumed my love of ruins was that they were invoking my childhood playgrounds.
So it surprises me how popular visions of dereliction are. This I think is pointing to something going on more universally than just my memories of my youth. I think it may well point to a general rejection of the way our societies are, that so many find images of its decline so attractive.
Having lived through the time of the fall of the USSR I think they did the wrong thing, not that the fall of the tyranny was bad but that they removed all signs that it had existed. I think history is important 'if you don't know from where you came, you have no hope of understanding where you are going'. Thus my inclination would not have been to remove all the statues of Lenin and Stalin, but to have adapted them or altered them to fit with the change, but to remain as a reminder of the past rather than what seems to be the modern way of always trying to start with a clean plate or at least an edited one to only show the nice bits.

Now Detroit has been interesting to me for a while as there are the sparks of a new green movement there. This is not just that the infrastructure is collapsing, but there are visionaries there creating what could become a new structure of urban agriculture. At the moment this seems to be flattening the old buildings to turn them into fields.

Quote
Green Detroit: Why the City Is Ground Zero for the Sustainability Movement
Ignore the mainstream media. Detroit is not about architectural ruins. The people are re-imagining their city in fresh and courageous ways and there is a lot to learn from them.


http://www.alternet.org/story/146577/green_detroit%3A_why_the_city_is_ground_zero_for_the_sustainability_movement



Quote
Urban farmer Olivia Hubert, co-owner of Brother Nature Produce, puts straw mulch around raspberry bushes on her one-acre urban farm in Detroit, Michigan



However I think a trick is being missed, from my short time in gardening I loved the walled gardens I worked in. At one time virtually every great English house had its own walled garden, the micro climates within the walled garden provided planting places for every type of plant that the big house needed to be provided with, all its vegetable and fruits. So for me the way forward is not to pull those disused buildings down, but to do exactly what the above posts are pointing at to reuse them for urban Agriculture.

This is as not as mad an idea as some might think. Already I know a lot of businesses making a good profit from urban agriculture. For instance some of the best Honey is coming from urban environments.
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=idYgzMUZFb4
New York also has great urban honey producers, my sons girlfriends parents produce fabulous urban honey from their hives in central London.
A huge amount of mushrooms eaten in London are grown in London.
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=7Dkgzn2fTmc
I know of a fish farm that is using the German underground bunkers in the channel islands, this actually makes a perfect environment for deep see fish. But I have not found links to it, so look at this in Chicago.
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2BEtplkio0A
The above is a commercial businesses so is ugly but it does not have to be that way.
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=LeMo5o46rso
That is a butterfly house in Skegness. Usually butterfly houses are based around pools, So it would be easy to see that practical fish farm being beautified and turned into a visitor attraction as well as a farm. The Art of farming is how many crops can be produced from a single place

Now I love London because as many visitors to it notice it is a fabulously green city, which is a lot to do with the Victorian love of parks. So if urban Agriculture is viable which it seems to be, we could then add that to the Victorian love of parks and create Green cities which not only can grow their own food but are also beautiful combinations of roof gardens to grottos we can promenade through and that also provide our needs.

Now that has to be steampunk, a combination of Victorian and new technologies.


In Australia, there are railway tunnels being used as mushroom farms.
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Arabella Periscope
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« Reply #30 on: February 01, 2015, 12:16:41 am »

This thread has given me the only optimistic vision (that is not complete fantasy) of the future ever.  Urban ruins transformed into self-sustaining green zones, the shells of factories turned into walled gardens like those of the monasteries and villages of medieval times.  It is a form of de-centralization that does not involve the isolation of people working at home on computers, if everyone also spent time gardening; and if an enormous EMP took out the infrastructure, there would be some hope of survival if self-sufficiency were already established, even if turnips and beans are not everyone's favorite foods.  It also would redirect all the energy now spent running miles for the only purpose of running, and lifting weights for the only purpose of flexing muscles.  And it would do the atmosphere good. And it would look lovely from space.

Thank you, Annie!









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Dr. Madd
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« Reply #31 on: February 01, 2015, 01:19:43 am »

That just the beginning.. High rise parking garages turned into  ferring stalls or chicken farms. Dank underground garages repurposed into mushroom farming. Hogs being raised in the city and city parks turned into commons for local peasants.
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Hurricane Annie
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« Reply #32 on: February 01, 2015, 01:39:28 am »

This thread has given me the only optimistic vision (that is not complete fantasy) of the future ever.  Urban ruins transformed into self-sustaining green zones, the shells of factories turned into walled gardens like those of the monasteries and villages of medieval times.  It is a form of de-centralization that does not involve the isolation of people working at home on computers, if everyone also spent time gardening; and if an enormous EMP took out the infrastructure, there would be some hope of survival if self-sufficiency were already established, even if turnips and beans are not everyone's favorite foods.  It also would redirect all the energy now spent running miles for the only purpose of running, and lifting weights for the only purpose of flexing muscles.  And it would do the atmosphere good. And it would look lovely from space.

Thank you, Annie!












 Thank you for that vision through your always inspiring periscope Miss Arabella.  There are grand examples from the past that can show us the way of the future

 Angor Temple , Cambodia




 So many amazing abandoned  Irish castles that nature has reclaimed ,  I cannot choose an image
http://oldmooresalmanac.com/news-topics/the-history-of-us1/princess-i-have-foundeth-a-tower.html
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Hurricane Annie
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« Reply #33 on: February 01, 2015, 01:40:25 am »

That just the beginning.. High rise parking garages turned into  ferring stalls or chicken farms. Dank underground garages repurposed into mushroom farming. Hogs being raised in the city and city parks turned into commons for local peasants.

 History has proved that cycle is often successful
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jonb
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« Reply #34 on: February 01, 2015, 01:45:23 am »

To be honest I don't think it is an if, I think it is inevitable.
The only question is for me can we bring it about nicely without conflict.
If our agriculture is unsustainable, by definition it will not last.
My grandfather in the nineteen thirties earned the national average wage on that he could afford on his wage alone to pay the rent on a four bedroom house which was the national average rent then and that took only one sixth of his income, and that was in Britain which is an island and housing prices are more expensive in constricted areas. Technology may seemed to have made us better off, but in truth the economic system which measures growth by increasing asset prices is making us in real terms poorer, and cannot continue even if in the short term it may just seem to be producing results.
Governments are getting into the position of having to force people to work, because work itself is failing to pay a living wage. This will also fail.
One of the oldest stories in the world is Aesop's fable of the bet between the sun and the wind. You cannot force a man to do something but if you make things pleasant for him as the sun did he will willing do what no force in the world could make him do.
We live in a time of the ending of old ways, it might be frightening, but there will be a new beginning.
When the western Roman Empire failed the last Emperor was not killed there was no revolution, he just retired to his villa, and all the people of western Europe became more healthy and found new ways to farm. They had the iron plough, we have the green house.

I honesty don't think it is a dream, but I think we should work towards bringing it about nicely.
« Last Edit: February 01, 2015, 01:49:20 am by jonb » Logged
jonb
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« Reply #35 on: February 01, 2015, 01:57:08 am »

http://earthship.com/Designs/earthship-village-ecologies

Please if you have the time look at these buildings and these ideas, its been working for forty years.
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Hurricane Annie
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« Reply #36 on: February 01, 2015, 03:11:16 am »

To be honest I don't think it is an if, I think it is inevitable.
The only question is for me can we bring it about nicely without conflict.
If our agriculture is unsustainable, by definition it will not last.
My grandfather in the nineteen thirties earned the national average wage on that he could afford on his wage alone to pay the rent on a four bedroom house which was the national average rent then and that took only one sixth of his income, and that was in Britain which is an island and housing prices are more expensive in constricted areas. Technology may seemed to have made us better off, but in truth the economic system which measures growth by increasing asset prices is making us in real terms poorer, and cannot continue even if in the short term it may just seem to be producing results.
Governments are getting into the position of having to force people to work, because work itself is failing to pay a living wage. This will also fail.
One of the oldest stories in the world is Aesop's fable of the bet between the sun and the wind. You cannot force a man to do something but if you make things pleasant for him as the sun did he will willing do what no force in the world could make him do.
We live in a time of the ending of old ways, it might be frightening, but there will be a new beginning.
When the western Roman Empire failed the last Emperor was not killed there was no revolution, he just retired to his villa, and all the people of western Europe became more healthy and found new ways to farm. They had the iron plough, we have the green house.

I honesty don't think it is a dream, but I think we should work towards bringing it about nicely.

New Zealand is facing  housing / accommodation squeeze  in the present. Lowered incomes, high house prices and rents mean  people living in unsuitable arrangements. [ I will not digress into the politics of it]

 I like to think we can look out side the box  for solutions. Often they can be found around us.
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jonb
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« Reply #37 on: February 01, 2015, 04:06:53 am »

I live on the edge of London tell me about it.
To be fair, I don't think it is political in that way anyway, least-ways I don't think it is the fault of the politicians they have to work with the economic models that are presented to them. This is a problem that is happening as far as I can see everywhere under all sorts of different government systems, so it looks to me as though it is a problem with academic economics which is something worked out in the twentieth century, so I would say a little looking back and a little looking forward is the way to go, to put a steampunk twist on it.   
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Hurricane Annie
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« Reply #38 on: February 01, 2015, 04:29:26 am »

I live on the edge of London tell me about it.
To be fair, I don't think it is political in that way anyway, least-ways I don't think it is the fault of the politicians they have to work with the economic models that are presented to them. This is a problem that is happening as far as I can see everywhere under all sorts of different government systems, so it looks to me as though it is a problem with academic economics which is something worked out in the twentieth century, so I would say a little looking back and a little looking forward is the way to go, to put a steampunk twist on it.   

 The other interesting and intriguing aspect is - that no matter what governmental societal  controls and urban planning are put in place, communities and populations will take their own form to fit  the requirements and demands of the individuals and groups with in.

 It will be interesting in this age of global communication,  social networking and access to shared information whether there will be alternative communities develop  with similar internal structure and social patterns.
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creagmor
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« Reply #39 on: February 01, 2015, 02:23:43 pm »

Having been involved in gardening for 45 plus years I'd like to say that not only is this a viable method of producing food at a local level, it is very good therapy; both for those doing the work and those who can and/or will "take time to smell the roses".

     
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jonb
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« Reply #40 on: February 01, 2015, 03:45:47 pm »

A great charity project
http://www.homelessgardenproject.org/
Quote
The Homeless Garden Project provides job training, transitional employment and support services to people who are homeless. HGP's vibrant education and volunteer program for the broad community blends formal, experiential and service-learning. The programs take place in our 3-acre organic farm and related enterprises.

Our Mission:

In the soil of our urban farm and garden, people find the tools they need to build a home in the world.



Some roof top gardens London





« Last Edit: February 01, 2015, 03:47:37 pm by jonb » Logged
Hurricane Annie
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« Reply #41 on: February 01, 2015, 11:58:48 pm »



 I read a interesting book a while back  on the taking back of an empty lot in New York by the locals. Vegetables, flowers  , poultry and bees. The bees were making red honey. It turned out  the hive was  ingesting dye from a local sweets factory.
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Arabella Periscope
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« Reply #42 on: February 02, 2015, 12:03:54 am »

This is a wonderful and inspiring prospect.  It is good for the environment, good for the future, and good for people's souls, like putting convicts together with wild mustangs and unruly shelter dogs.  
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jonb
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« Reply #43 on: February 02, 2015, 12:46:36 am »

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Garden_city_movement
Quote
The garden city movement is a method of urban planning that was initiated in 1898 by Sir Ebenezer Howard in the United Kingdom. Garden cities were intended to be planned, self-contained communities surrounded by "greenbelts", containing proportionate areas of residences, industry and agriculture.


It has been too long now is the time for action green the grey.




The seed bomb!


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GCCC
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« Reply #44 on: February 02, 2015, 09:43:46 am »

I would definitely stock with plants from these guys:  http://www.txtriffidranch.com/

"The Texas Triffid Ranch is a very small nursery specializing in carnivorous, prehistoric, and otherwise exotic plants."

Unfortunately, they're closed until May, but here are some samples of their wares:
Spoiler (click to show/hide)

Spoiler (click to show/hide)

Spoiler (click to show/hide)

Spoiler (click to show/hide)

To my knowledge, none of these grow to gargantuan proportions, so I'd also add some of the plants already featured on this thread to mimic as closely as possible that feel of an explorer who's returned from either Maplewhite Land or Pellucidar.
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jonb
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« Reply #45 on: February 02, 2015, 10:52:41 am »

Those plants would be ideal in the right place, warm and wet with a low quality soil would be a situation that might be encountered often in a derelict city. Plus they also would help clean up an environment. Once we go for diversity the urban jungle can become everyone's paradise.

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Maets
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« Reply #46 on: February 03, 2015, 02:07:22 am »

Those plants would be ideal in the right place, warm and wet with a low quality soil would be a situation that might be encountered often in a derelict city. Plus they also would help clean up an environment. Once we go for diversity the urban jungle can become everyone's paradise.




That is fantastic!
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Rose Inverness
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« Reply #47 on: February 08, 2015, 12:55:39 am »



Glass houses are enchanting when they are large enough, say from orangery size to Crystal Palace.  The aviary at Kew has aerial walkways (I think it was at Kew) which go through the tops of the trees.  A vision of a new world in which vast ruined industrial buildings are transformed into gardens is absolutely wonderful!  And stained glass is always magical.




Absolutely enchanting image!! Now that you mention it, citrus trees would be divine... and blueberry bushes.
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That delicate forest flower,   
With scented breath and look so like a smile,   
Seems, as it issues from the shapeless mould,   
An emanation of the indwelling Life,   
A visible token of the upholding Love,   
That are the soul of this great universe.

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Trains to Steamtown, this way...
Arabella Periscope
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« Reply #48 on: February 08, 2015, 01:23:41 am »

Not forgetting furry bees who allow you to stroke them!
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jonb
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« Reply #49 on: February 08, 2015, 01:35:45 am »

Everything responds to kindness-

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=l42N2EkxTso

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Wcy_6uNTXlU
« Last Edit: February 08, 2015, 02:58:15 am by jonb » Logged
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