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Author Topic: Steampunk Conservatory or Green House - Your Personal Dream Jungle  (Read 3835 times)
Hurricane Annie
Zeppelin Captain
*****
New Zealand New Zealand



« on: January 24, 2015, 04:21:28 am »



 What would you have and how would your do it ??

 A conservatory as a garden room , a separate wing,  out building or other?

 Would you live in one?

 Would you spend your day in there?

Would you have goldfish , aviary or other menagerie?

 What would you plant?

 Or any other answers to  unasked questions.
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Hurricane Annie
Zeppelin Captain
*****
New Zealand New Zealand



« Reply #1 on: January 24, 2015, 05:09:53 am »









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jonb
Snr. Officer
****
England England



« Reply #2 on: January 24, 2015, 04:38:55 pm »

Dear Annie, I have since boyhood enjoyed palm houses, a truly Victorian Invention, but I am surprised that they might be as evocative for you as they are for me. The Victorians had a relationship with ferns, and palms it is said partly because these plants without flowers were not overtly sexual and therefore made the perfect backdrop for the Victorian gentile woman.
The reason why I am surprised is that in English palm houses it is very common to use plants from New Zealand, thus often the palm house is only in some ways a poor reflection of what you have growing naturally.

The pot plant which was in every British Victorian home which could afford it, almost the mark of English Victorian indoor gardening was the Aspidistra which although is a flowering plant was kept for its green foliage and easy requirements.

A lovely Victorian gardening idea was the 'midnight bloomers' which I used in a number of garden designs (when I did such things) and work well for people who in these days of long work hours and time poverty which means often people find it hard to enjoy their gardens during the day.
The Victorians planted their gardens with predominantly white flowering plants. These flowers reflected the moonlight and once your eyes have adjusted to the dark the  flowers even seem to shine out of a border, add a few small coloured lights into the canopy of the trees in your garden and you have the perfect backdrop to an evenings tate-a-tate.

The palm house, conservatory or winter garden has one other feature which has ensured its polarity it is a controlled environment, so while the outside world is raining snowing or driven by wind it allows a person to enjoy nature in a convivial atmosphere.
The glass house is my Achilles heal, in many ways I can tolerate my lack of wealth but I have to admit I deeply desire the ownership of a green house of almost any form.
Logged
Hurricane Annie
Zeppelin Captain
*****
New Zealand New Zealand



« Reply #3 on: January 24, 2015, 05:48:15 pm »


Dear Jonb, there is a terrible tendency to not appreciate what one has in their own back yard. There is a lush native bush in new Zealand  that we totally take for granted, to the point that much of it was lost to farming and logging. The preference for palms and their modesty is one I had not heard. We only have 1 native palm, the nikau. Polynesians were unable to get the coconut palm to grow, nuts that wash up are unable to germinate due to the lowered temperatures here.

 Being of a temperate  climate we can grow most plants out door or  indoor. Many of us have patio gardens and indoor plants with ferns, palms, taro, bromiliad, clematis and jasmine, agave, yukka,  red hot pokers, strelizia and more.  Frost though can have a decimating effect on  young tropical plants at times.  Hence in our larger civic conservatories  or winter gardens we have  the more tender South American and South African plants as a novelty.

New Zealand was settled in the Victorian and Edwardian era; many colonists were former soldiers, sailors, missionaries and agricultural labourers with adventurous spirits; they brought their ideas and experiences of  exotic travel with them.  We have acclimatised introduced  plants growing wild here now from Australia, the Americas,  the Dark Continent, the Occident and the British Isles.  The antipodean  colonial love of the exotic  in the form of plants such as morning  glory, kapok plant, agapanthus, acanthus , datura ,passion flowers , nasturtium, bamboo, wandering willy [Jew] , oxalis  etc has  led to these and other plants invading our native rain forest and beaches.  There are  none of the natural controls such as insect  predators  or climate control  to stop them   growing like triffids across the landscape. They have been declared along with yellow gorse [scotland], to be  noxious weed.

 The Domain Winter Gardens in Auckland while small,  is a picturesque  municipal amenity   enjoyed by young and old, often used for wedding photo back drop .













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Atterton
Time Traveler
****

Only The Shadow knows


« Reply #4 on: January 24, 2015, 05:55:13 pm »

That last plant is definitely not appropiate for the victorian era!
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Resurrectionist and freelance surgeon.
jonb
Snr. Officer
****
England England



« Reply #5 on: January 24, 2015, 06:28:34 pm »



Amorphophallus titanum

Quote
The titan arum grows in the wild only in the equatorial rainforests of Sumatra, Indonesia. It was first scientifically described in 1878 by Italian botanist Odoardo Beccari. The plant flowers only infrequently in the wild and even more rarely when cultivated. It first flowered in cultivation at the Royal Botanic Gardens at Kew in London, in 1889, with over 100 cultivated blossoms since then.


http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Amorphophallus_titanum

I think it is appropriate, but the smell might put you off the Rotting corpse lilly.
« Last Edit: January 24, 2015, 06:32:44 pm by jonb » Logged
Hurricane Annie
Zeppelin Captain
*****
New Zealand New Zealand



« Reply #6 on: January 24, 2015, 06:35:20 pm »

That last plant is definitely not appropiate for the victorian era!

 "Don't look Ethel !!!!"

 "Fetch  the smelling salts "
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Drew P
Zeppelin Admiral
******
United States United States


« Reply #7 on: January 25, 2015, 01:53:19 am »

From then on, Ethel returned day after day...
 Cheesy
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Never ask 'Why?'
Always ask 'Why not!?'
Hurricane Annie
Zeppelin Captain
*****
New Zealand New Zealand



« Reply #8 on: January 25, 2015, 02:09:46 am »

From then on, Ethel returned day after day...
 Cheesy


 Ethel just couldn't keep herself away... she felt some how strangely drawn   to the place....



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creagmor
Zeppelin Captain
*****
South Africa South Africa



« Reply #9 on: January 25, 2015, 02:52:57 am »

Way back when I was a kid I saw my first Japanese style garden and have loved them ever since. BTW the Japanese were (are?) fond of gardens containing only plants that produced white flowers. If I remember correctly this is called a moon viewing garden.  Ironically although I like the complicated and often fussy styles of houses built in the late 1800s I can really appreciate the stark simplicity of a Zen garden. Over the years I have been fortunate enough to have had an opportunity to create several; a couple of which were small table top versions.

My Ideal garden would consist of a dimly lit cave, replete with stalagmites and stalactites, veiled by a water fall cascading into a pond. This would be surrounded with ferns and an ancient willow slanting over it, branches dangling into the water, and colourful fish darting about.  Melodious birds would be very nice, but not absolutely necessary.
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“Love is an emotional thing, and whatever is emotional is opposed to that cold true reason which I place above all things.” Sherlock Holmes, in The Sign of Four.
Hurricane Annie
Zeppelin Captain
*****
New Zealand New Zealand



« Reply #10 on: January 25, 2015, 03:22:01 am »

Way back when I was a kid I saw my first Japanese style garden and have loved them ever since. BTW the Japanese were (are?) fond of gardens containing only plants that produced white flowers. If I remember correctly this is called a moon viewing garden.  Ironically although I like the complicated and often fussy styles of houses built in the late 1800s I can really appreciate the stark simplicity of a Zen garden. Over the years I have been fortunate enough to have had an opportunity to create several; a couple of which were small table top versions.

My Ideal garden would consist of a dimly lit cave, replete with stalagmites and stalactites, veiled by a water fall cascading into a pond. This would be surrounded with ferns and an ancient willow slanting over it, branches dangling into the water, and colourful fish darting about.  Melodious birds would be very nice, but not absolutely necessary.

 That would be  one for Zen and the Art of  Cave  Sanctuary.
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jonb
Snr. Officer
****
England England



« Reply #11 on: January 25, 2015, 06:30:24 am »

You may be interested in this place then.

Dewstow gardens

http://www.countryfile.com/days-out/dewstow-hidden-gardens-and-grottoes-monmouthshire







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Dr. Madd
Zeppelin Captain
*****
United States United States


Maker of Monsters


« Reply #12 on: January 25, 2015, 08:33:08 am »

My greenhouse of choice would feature a place the size of an old auto factory. In fact, I've been advocating that in places where Heavy Industry has dissappeared and left behind empty buildings, to convert them to giant greenhouses to sustain cities and keep people working. Iceland grows and exports bananas. Therefore why not Pineapple in New York state- Coconuts in Chicago, Papaya in detroit?

For my own use, a two room unit attached to the house. The decorative one features Cactuses. I like Cactuses. The other one would feature a beehive as part of a self-containment and pollenization system and would supply the house with honey and vegetables. One would collect the vegetables at night after the bees were asleep.
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What do we want? Decapitations!
Hurricane Annie
Zeppelin Captain
*****
New Zealand New Zealand



« Reply #13 on: January 25, 2015, 11:23:09 am »

 Mr Jonb , yes that is a an interesting grotto

  Dr Madd "ethel" , there are indeed a swathe of empty but interesting  Heavy Industry  Detroit  buildings left behind by the economic morass. Many of them are quite intriguing and I have seen blog sites where they have been used for  events such as weddings, parties, photo shoots and more permanent uses as beer halls and ruin pubs.

 Now that you have brought to our attention the could be used as ornamental or commercial growing  green house purposes. Apart from tropical fruit, exotic plants could  be quite ethereal   a post  industrial environment . It would be a civic talking point.






OHIO


 Buenos Aires
« Last Edit: January 25, 2015, 11:26:50 am by Hurricane Annie » Logged
creagmor
Zeppelin Captain
*****
South Africa South Africa



« Reply #14 on: January 25, 2015, 03:43:05 pm »

jonb that is truly beautiful. Thanks for sharing.
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jonb
Snr. Officer
****
England England



« Reply #15 on: January 25, 2015, 05:01:15 pm »

I am deeply in tune with the way this thread is pointing!

Being a London boy of the fifties/sixties, my playgrounds were the bomb sites which I could almost walk through from central London out to Epping forest in Essex only crossing the occasional road with smashed buildings all the way. About ten to fifteen miles of dereliction. The last of these bomb sites were only finally built over in the nineteen eighties 40 years after the war. So I presumed my love of ruins was that they were invoking my childhood playgrounds.
So it surprises me how popular visions of dereliction are. This I think is pointing to something going on more universally than just my memories of my youth. I think it may well point to a general rejection of the way our societies are, that so many find images of its decline so attractive.
Having lived through the time of the fall of the USSR I think they did the wrong thing, not that the fall of the tyranny was bad but that they removed all signs that it had existed. I think history is important 'if you don't know from where you came, you have no hope of understanding where you are going'. Thus my inclination would not have been to remove all the statues of Lenin and Stalin, but to have adapted them or altered them to fit with the change, but to remain as a reminder of the past rather than what seems to be the modern way of always trying to start with a clean plate or at least an edited one to only show the nice bits.

Now Detroit has been interesting to me for a while as there are the sparks of a new green movement there. This is not just that the infrastructure is collapsing, but there are visionaries there creating what could become a new structure of urban agriculture. At the moment this seems to be flattening the old buildings to turn them into fields.

Quote
Green Detroit: Why the City Is Ground Zero for the Sustainability Movement
Ignore the mainstream media. Detroit is not about architectural ruins. The people are re-imagining their city in fresh and courageous ways and there is a lot to learn from them.


http://www.alternet.org/story/146577/green_detroit%3A_why_the_city_is_ground_zero_for_the_sustainability_movement



Quote
Urban farmer Olivia Hubert, co-owner of Brother Nature Produce, puts straw mulch around raspberry bushes on her one-acre urban farm in Detroit, Michigan



However I think a trick is being missed, from my short time in gardening I loved the walled gardens I worked in. At one time virtually every great English house had its own walled garden, the micro climates within the walled garden provided planting places for every type of plant that the big house needed to be provided with, all its vegetable and fruits. So for me the way forward is not to pull those disused buildings down, but to do exactly what the above posts are pointing at to reuse them for urban Agriculture.

This is as not as mad an idea as some might think. Already I know a lot of businesses making a good profit from urban agriculture. For instance some of the best Honey is coming from urban environments.
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=idYgzMUZFb4
New York also has great urban honey producers, my sons girlfriends parents produce fabulous urban honey from their hives in central London.
A huge amount of mushrooms eaten in London are grown in London.
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=7Dkgzn2fTmc
I know of a fish farm that is using the German underground bunkers in the channel islands, this actually makes a perfect environment for deep see fish. But I have not found links to it, so look at this in Chicago.
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2BEtplkio0A
The above is a commercial businesses so is ugly but it does not have to be that way.
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=LeMo5o46rso
That is a butterfly house in Skegness. Usually butterfly houses are based around pools, So it would be easy to see that practical fish farm being beautified and turned into a visitor attraction as well as a farm. The Art of farming is how many crops can be produced from a single place

Now I love London because as many visitors to it notice it is a fabulously green city, which is a lot to do with the Victorian love of parks. So if urban Agriculture is viable which it seems to be, we could then add that to the Victorian love of parks and create Green cities which not only can grow their own food but are also beautiful combinations of roof gardens to grottos we can promenade through and that also provide our needs.

Now that has to be steampunk, a combination of Victorian and new technologies.
« Last Edit: January 25, 2015, 05:08:39 pm by jonb » Logged
Cousin Itt
Officer
***
United States United States


Kontraptional Ungineer


« Reply #16 on: January 25, 2015, 07:03:22 pm »

In Wisconsin we have The Mitchell Park Horticultural Conservatory (The Domes)
http://county.milwaukee.gov/MitchellParkConserva10116.htm
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Hurricane Annie
Zeppelin Captain
*****
New Zealand New Zealand



« Reply #17 on: January 25, 2015, 07:59:03 pm »

I am deeply in tune with the way this thread is pointing!

Being a London boy of the fifties/sixties, my playgrounds were the bomb sites which I could almost walk through from central London out to Epping forest in Essex only crossing the occasional road with smashed buildings all the way. About ten to fifteen miles of dereliction. The last of these bomb sites were only finally built over in the nineteen eighties 40 years after the war. So I presumed my love of ruins was that they were invoking my childhood playgrounds.
So it surprises me how popular visions of dereliction are. This I think is pointing to something going on more universally than just my memories of my youth. I think it may well point to a general rejection of the way our societies are, that so many find images of its decline so attractive.
Having lived through the time of the fall of the USSR I think they did the wrong thing, not that the fall of the tyranny was bad but that they removed all signs that it had existed. I think history is important 'if you don't know from where you came, you have no hope of understanding where you are going'. Thus my inclination would not have been to remove all the statues of Lenin and Stalin, but to have adapted them or altered them to fit with the change, but to remain as a reminder of the past rather than what seems to be the modern way of always trying to start with a clean plate or at least an edited one to only show the nice bits.

Now Detroit has been interesting to me for a while as there are the sparks of a new green movement there. This is not just that the infrastructure is collapsing, but there are visionaries there creating what could become a new structure of urban agriculture. At the moment this seems to be flattening the old buildings to turn them into fields.

Quote
Green Detroit: Why the City Is Ground Zero for the Sustainability Movement
Ignore the mainstream media. Detroit is not about architectural ruins. The people are re-imagining their city in fresh and courageous ways and there is a lot to learn from them.


http://www.alternet.org/story/146577/green_detroit%3A_why_the_city_is_ground_zero_for_the_sustainability_movement



Quote
Urban farmer Olivia Hubert, co-owner of Brother Nature Produce, puts straw mulch around raspberry bushes on her one-acre urban farm in Detroit, Michigan



However I think a trick is being missed, from my short time in gardening I loved the walled gardens I worked in. At one time virtually every great English house had its own walled garden, the micro climates within the walled garden provided planting places for every type of plant that the big house needed to be provided with, all its vegetable and fruits. So for me the way forward is not to pull those disused buildings down, but to do exactly what the above posts are pointing at to reuse them for urban Agriculture.

This is as not as mad an idea as some might think. Already I know a lot of businesses making a good profit from urban agriculture. For instance some of the best Honey is coming from urban environments.
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=idYgzMUZFb4
New York also has great urban honey producers, my sons girlfriends parents produce fabulous urban honey from their hives in central London.
A huge amount of mushrooms eaten in London are grown in London.
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=7Dkgzn2fTmc
I know of a fish farm that is using the German underground bunkers in the channel islands, this actually makes a perfect environment for deep see fish. But I have not found links to it, so look at this in Chicago.
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2BEtplkio0A
The above is a commercial businesses so is ugly but it does not have to be that way.
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=LeMo5o46rso
That is a butterfly house in Skegness. Usually butterfly houses are based around pools, So it would be easy to see that practical fish farm being beautified and turned into a visitor attraction as well as a farm. The Art of farming is how many crops can be produced from a single place

Now I love London because as many visitors to it notice it is a fabulously green city, which is a lot to do with the Victorian love of parks. So if urban Agriculture is viable which it seems to be, we could then add that to the Victorian love of parks and create Green cities which not only can grow their own food but are also beautiful combinations of roof gardens to grottos we can promenade through and that also provide our needs.

Now that has to be steampunk, a combination of Victorian and new technologies.


 They are wonderful futuristic domes

 Mitchell Park Horticultural Conservatory  [Domes]



 yes  Dr Madd has taken us  on a tangent to an almost spiritual journey. 
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frances
Zeppelin Captain
*****
United Kingdom United Kingdom



« Reply #18 on: January 25, 2015, 08:45:46 pm »

I so much want a greenhouse/conservatory extension on my house.  I have checked with the local authority who want me to have an extension rather than something that is all glass.  The existing 1950's conservatory is rotten and I have been saving hard.  My main problem is finding someone to build it.  I have collected a few bits of old stained glass, some with curved tops, some panels bordered in brass.

How do I find someone who can build me such a thing at reasonable cost?
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Hurricane Annie
Zeppelin Captain
*****
New Zealand New Zealand



« Reply #19 on: January 25, 2015, 09:36:27 pm »

I so much want a greenhouse/conservatory extension on my house.  I have checked with the local authority who want me to have an extension rather than something that is all glass.  The existing 1950's conservatory is rotten and I have been saving hard.  My main problem is finding someone to build it.  I have collected a few bits of old stained glass, some with curved tops, some panels bordered in brass.

How do I find someone who can build me such a thing at reasonable cost?

 Keep asking around everywhere , find out who has done OK jobs for others. There is always somebody who knows someone who likes the more interesting jobs.
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Arabella Periscope
Zeppelin Captain
*****
United States United States


Edwardian summer


« Reply #20 on: January 26, 2015, 02:58:17 am »



Glass houses are enchanting when they are large enough, say from orangery size to Crystal Palace.  The aviary at Kew has aerial walkways (I think it was at Kew) which go through the tops of the trees.  A vision of a new world in which vast ruined industrial buildings are transformed into gardens is absolutely wonderful!  And stained glass is always magical.

I would add birds to mine, and possibly squirrels.








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Kenneth: 'If you're so hot, you can tell me how to say she has ideas above her station.'
Brian:'Oh yes, I forgot. It's fairly easy, old boy.
Elle a des idees au-dessus de sa gare.'
Kenneth: 'Idiot.  It's not that kind of station.'

Terence Rattigan 'French Without Tears.'
Hurricane Annie
Zeppelin Captain
*****
New Zealand New Zealand



« Reply #21 on: January 26, 2015, 03:04:45 am »


 Fish  and amphibian below with  birds above

 and a perhaps a platform with the all important Periscope
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Atterton
Time Traveler
****

Only The Shadow knows


« Reply #22 on: January 26, 2015, 03:16:12 am »

They have a nice three-storey greenhouse in the Copenhagen Botanical Garden. They also have bees that are willing to let you stroke them on the back.
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SeVeNeVeS
Immortal
**
England England



« Reply #23 on: January 26, 2015, 06:52:48 pm »

I so much want a greenhouse/conservatory extension on my house.  I have checked with the local authority who want me to have an extension rather than something that is all glass.  The existing 1950's conservatory is rotten and I have been saving hard.  My main problem is finding someone to build it.  I have collected a few bits of old stained glass, some with curved tops, some panels bordered in brass.

How do I find someone who can build me such a thing at reasonable cost?
They would say that as an extention with a tiled, solid roof needs planning permission and building inspectors to sign off every stage, so they make money.

Check again for local regulations, where I live if you are not increasing the current footprint and just replacing the old for new double glazed then no permision required, a conservatory is considered a temperary construction.

unless your house is in protected area they cant do squat.

It could get more complicated if you add radiators and electrics or open the area permanantly to the main house, it then becomes a habital room.

Get alot of free quotes from local firms both builders and double glazing companies and gleen all the info you can.

Just wanted to add...... avoid the big companies (Zenith etc) they will shaft ya rotten.

A few years ago my niece was quoted for a coservatory, then had a chat with me, after a bit of tooing and froing they knocked 8k off the original price. Take your time on this, you could save alot of money, and if you can go with a recomendation...... ask family, friends and neighbours.
« Last Edit: January 26, 2015, 07:23:23 pm by SeVeNeVeS » Logged

creagmor
Zeppelin Captain
*****
South Africa South Africa



« Reply #24 on: January 26, 2015, 08:11:05 pm »

Ms Arabella, that is truly something out of a fantasy. With your kind permission I will promptly be adding that to my horticultural wish list.
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