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Author Topic: On How To Protect Your Cemetery Against Grave Robber.  (Read 1133 times)
chicar
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Chicar556
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« on: December 14, 2014, 12:23:20 am »

Quoted From Cracked.Com:

Body-snatching was a popular career choice among ne'er-do-wells during the 18th and 19th centuries. Budding young doctors needed bodies for practice and possibly also for horrific puppet shows, but donating your body to science wasn't a thing yet. So graves needed protecting. Here's what an 18th-century graveyard security system looked like:


That's a cemetery gun. Now, you're probably thinking, "How clever! It must have had some type of pressure-sensitive trigger that set it off if a robber tried to dig up the grave." To which we say that's very cute and naive of you -- this was the 18th century, remember, and apparently the value of innocent life wasn't invented until sometime in the 1950s.

The cemetery gun was secretly set up at night (so criminals wouldn't know which graves were trapped) and was rigged with tripwires that both swiveled the gun in the direction that was tripped and also fired at what tripped it -- be it grave-robber, random animal, or unlucky grieving relative who worked a swing shift. An alternate method of grave protection was known as a grave torpedo.



Sadly, no, there weren't torpedoes being fired from coffins and skittering about beneath the cemetery like explosive graboids. The grave torpedo came in two forms, one substantially more insane than the other. The first was basically a shotgun rigged to blow once the coffin's lid was removed. Understandable. The second rigged your dearly departed grandma with the equivalent of a goddamn anti-tank mine. This version of the grave torpedo was equipped with a metal plate backed by a large black-powder charge. Digging up the grave (or walking over it fatly) would set off the charge and disturb the holy crap out of that cemetery's peaceful slumber. As an advertisement for the device put it: "Sleep well, sweet angel, let no fears of ghouls disturb thy rest, for above thy shrouded form lies a torpedo, ready to make mincemeat of anyone who attempts to convey you to the pickling vat."

Most of them probably never worked, and those that did have likely long since been dismantled or decayed. But still, the next time you're touring an old graveyard, step lightly: you could be playing a game of necrotic Minesweeper.


The more Dieselpunk left of the article:
http://www.cracked.com/article_21738_the-5-most-horrifying-booby-traps-in-history-war.html




« Last Edit: December 14, 2014, 12:25:59 am by chicar » Logged

The word pagan came from paganus , who mean peasant . Its was a way to significate than christianism was the religion of the elite and paganism the one of the savage worker class.

''Trickster shows us how we trick OURSELVES. Her rampant curiosity backfires, but, then, something NEW is discovered (though usually not what She expected)! This is where creativity comes from—experiment, do something different, maybe even something forbidden, and voila! A breakthrough occurs! Ha! Ha! We are released! The world is created anew! Do something backwards, break your own traditions, the barrier breaks; destroy the world as you know it, let the new in.''
Extract of the Dreamflesh article ''Path of The Sacred Clown''
Hektor Plasm
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« Reply #1 on: December 14, 2014, 07:21:36 pm »

Heh heh, necrotic minesweeper!  Grin


Nice find!

HP
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"all die! o, the embarrassment."
H Plasm Esq. ICUE    Avatar by and with kind permission of Dr Geof. Ta!!

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selectedgrub
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« Reply #2 on: December 16, 2014, 06:18:26 am »

Yes, thanks for sharing.
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The Inventor
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« Reply #3 on: December 17, 2014, 07:15:25 am »

I ran a whole series of Call of Cthulhu games about 19th century grave robbery ( an the investigators were searching for who dun it )
The Grave mines "Torpedoes" were a wonderful thing I found on OPB programs about historically obscure weapons.
Love it.
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Rory B Esq BSc
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« Reply #4 on: December 20, 2014, 06:49:05 pm »

I wonder if you loaded one with sharpened matchsticks (the heads provide the propellant) it could get vampires as they emerged? Now someone's going to use that Idea in a book or film aren't they. Maybe a sign saying 'Possible vampire buried here... dig up at your own risk' would have worked?

The 'cemetery gun' seems to be a marketing version of the anti poaching guns used on estates, and 'booby trapping' bodies has been common practice for 100 years. Where guerrilla fighters operate you NEVER turn over a body dumped by the roadside, you tie a  rope to it and move it from a safe distance first.



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Hektor Plasm
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All-Round Oddfellow.


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« Reply #5 on: December 21, 2014, 11:28:58 pm »

Love the matchstick-gun idea- but would it not have to point in the downwards direction...?  Smiley

HP
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Alexis Voltaire
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Shàlle We Dànce?


« Reply #6 on: December 22, 2014, 04:21:28 am »

Nifty.

I can see these being used as makeshift handheld weapons by grim reapers and/or the living dead.
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