The Steampunk Forum at Brass Goggles
December 18, 2017, 04:24:15 am *
Welcome, Guest. Please login or register.
Did you miss your activation email?

Login with username, password and session length
News: Brassgoggles.co.uk - The Lighter Side Of Steampunk, follow @brasstech for forum technical problems & updates.
 
   Home   Blog Help Rules Login Register  
Pages: [1] 2   Go Down
  Print  
Author Topic: If One Was Buying a Residence to Steampunk - would you:  (Read 1610 times)
Hurricane Annie
Zeppelin Captain
*****
New Zealand New Zealand



« on: October 16, 2014, 11:42:05 pm »


 If one was undertaking to purchase a residence [ house, house truck, Caravan , submarine, boat, ship,  airship, cabin, shed, apartment, glasshouse, yurt,   warehouse, factory or if you were really lucky a castle...]

 What would you look for in its bones?

 how far would you trick it out?

Where would you start first?

 Would a garden  be included ?

 would you be open to opening it up for public perusal?

 What other contingencies would you take into consideration?

Logged
Hurricane Annie
Zeppelin Captain
*****
New Zealand New Zealand



« Reply #1 on: October 16, 2014, 11:46:36 pm »



 I would extend it out into the garden.

 Though I am not sure I would go all the way full on intense steampunk through  the whole entire house - unless I was charging admission -
Logged
Atterton
Time Traveler
****

Only The Shadow knows


« Reply #2 on: October 16, 2014, 11:49:30 pm »

I would make a steam sauna.  Grin
Logged

Resurrectionist and freelance surgeon.
Hurricane Annie
Zeppelin Captain
*****
New Zealand New Zealand



« Reply #3 on: October 17, 2014, 12:08:25 am »



Hadn't thought of that. Yes, to go with the spa parties Wink
Logged
Atterton
Time Traveler
****

Only The Shadow knows


« Reply #4 on: October 17, 2014, 12:59:36 am »

A conservatory would feel rather victorian.
Logged
Arabella Periscope
Zeppelin Captain
*****
United States United States


Edwardian summer


« Reply #5 on: October 17, 2014, 03:21:36 am »

I think I would look for a ruin, Annie.  A true gothic ruin.  And maybe leave part of it unrestored, as if a time-lapse or interdimensional rift passed over it. Then it could be made very futuristic in its comforts in a concealed way, and could be decorated in the style of the Steam-age past as we would like it to have been and the best of the future as we imagine it ought to be.

I wish we could do it!!!   
Logged

Kenneth: 'If you're so hot, you can tell me how to say she has ideas above her station.'
Brian:'Oh yes, I forgot. It's fairly easy, old boy.
Elle a des idees au-dessus de sa gare.'
Kenneth: 'Idiot.  It's not that kind of station.'

Terence Rattigan 'French Without Tears.'
Hez
Zeppelin Captain
*****
Canada Canada


aka Miss Primrose C Leigh


« Reply #6 on: October 17, 2014, 04:37:26 am »

I think I would look for a ruin, Annie.  A true gothic ruin.  And maybe leave part of it unrestored, as if a time-lapse or interdimensional rift passed over it. Then it could be made very futuristic in its comforts in a concealed way, and could be decorated in the style of the Steam-age past as we would like it to have been and the best of the future as we imagine it ought to be.

I wish we could do it!!!   

Plexiglass roof and walls so that it looks like a ruin but is weather-proof. 
Little "rockets" on the legs of an antique chaise longue secretly suspended about 4 inches off the ground so it looks like it is hovering. 
Living grass instead of a carpet.
Motion activated gas sconces.
That $50,000 table that spins open.
Secret passages
and it could hav... wait, what are you doing?  I don't need a jacket and why has it got such long sleeves?
Help, I'm getting   carried   aawaaayyyy

Logged
Hez
Zeppelin Captain
*****
Canada Canada


aka Miss Primrose C Leigh


« Reply #7 on: October 17, 2014, 04:44:14 am »

My first thought, before seeing Ms. Periscope's wonderful plan, was to find the largest possible Airstream trailer and refinish it in brass, possibly with riveted repair patches and create either an airship or a submarine, or something in between.  The inside would be done up in the wood/leather/brass aesthetic of an upper class library with a small chandelier and the rear 6-7 feet as a workshop.


er, I do actually have a blueprint for it created one whimsical evening some time ago.
Logged
Hurricane Annie
Zeppelin Captain
*****
New Zealand New Zealand



« Reply #8 on: October 17, 2014, 07:17:33 am »

 Ruins with perspex   fill to keep out the weather  and to preserve its natural state would be amazing.

 Alas  we live in a relatively newly colonised country.

Would it be hard to build our own  ruin?
Logged
Hurricane Annie
Zeppelin Captain
*****
New Zealand New Zealand



« Reply #9 on: October 17, 2014, 07:18:49 am »

A conservatory would feel rather victorian.

 I recently viewed on google, old conservatory glass houses that had been turned into homes. They were inspirational.
Logged
walking stick
Zeppelin Admiral
******
England England


« Reply #10 on: October 17, 2014, 07:24:05 am »

Assume unlimited budget, a really good work team for the building and a Steampunk savvy group of people to staff it afterwards, I'd have a hotel. Perhaps a former stately home with it's own grounds. Each of the lifts would have beautiful wood and brass detailing and a helpful attendant.  Bedrooms would be built to themes such as The Nautilus suite.  Modified mobility scooters for disabled guests could safely negotiate the wide doorways and corridors, each scooter done up as a customised steam car or clockwork carriage.  There would be a conservatory with a gymnasium for exercise and a health spa section. It would include heated swimming pools of various sizes, including large for swimming and diving and shallow for children's swimming. The spa pool with seating built in for taking the waters would be serviced by a clockwork paddle steamer to deliver tea.  The concert area would have excellent soundproofing from the outside so a guest could sleep quietly even if we had some very enthusiastic music indeed. There would, naturally, be a ballroom. The bar would include a steampunk mixologists machine.  There would be a Library/reading room with a good selection of Literature and reference books.  I may continue at length in later posts, however this is a sufficient start.
Logged
Hurricane Annie
Zeppelin Captain
*****
New Zealand New Zealand



« Reply #11 on: October 17, 2014, 07:32:11 am »

Assume unlimited budget, a really good work team for the building and a Steampunk savvy group of people to staff it afterwards, I'd have a hotel. Perhaps a former stately home with it's own grounds. Each of the lifts would have beautiful wood and brass detailing and a helpful attendant.  Bedrooms would be built to themes such as The Nautilus suite.  Modified mobility scooters for disabled guests could safely negotiate the wide doorways and corridors, each scooter done up as a customised steam car or clockwork carriage.  There would be a conservatory with a gymnasium for exercise and a health spa section. It would include heated swimming pools of various sizes, including large for swimming and diving and shallow for children's swimming. The spa pool with seating built in for taking the waters would be serviced by a clockwork paddle steamer to deliver tea.  The concert area would have excellent soundproofing from the outside so a guest could sleep quietly even if we had some very enthusiastic music indeed. There would, naturally, be a ballroom. The bar would include a steampunk mixologists machine.  There would be a Library/reading room with a good selection of Literature and reference books.  I may continue at length in later posts, however this is a sufficient start.

Yes those magnificent stately homes that I can only see on TV or in the  coffee table books from the local library  lend themselves strongly to the  steampunk ethos.  Particularly those that still retain a medi eval Gothic charm.

 The Crusaders room could be popular What Ho!
Logged
Hurricane Annie
Zeppelin Captain
*****
New Zealand New Zealand



« Reply #12 on: October 17, 2014, 08:58:57 am »


 Some ideas for  glasshouse living














Logged
James Harrison
Immortal
**
England England


Bachelor of the Arts; Master of the Sciences


« Reply #13 on: October 17, 2014, 09:24:33 am »

I think it quite funny that every time I look at houses, or sit down at my drawing board and start idly sketching, I always find myself considering where the library and the orangery are going to go.  Everything always revolves around a large fireplace and takes on that Edwardian motif, the pinwheel plan, too. 
Logged

Persons intending to travel by open carriage should select a seat with their backs to the engine, by which means they will avoid the ashes emitted therefrom, that in travelling generally, but particularly through the tunnels, prove a great annoyance; the carriage farthest from the engine will in consequence be found the most desirable.
Maets
Immortal
**
United States United States

Gravatar

Airship Builder


WWW
« Reply #14 on: October 17, 2014, 02:47:33 pm »

To me the most important aspect is the sight.  Must be secluded, off the beaten trail and yet not too far from civilization.  The house must make use of the sight, its flow and its views.  And there has to be water.
Logged

SeVeNeVeS
Immortal
**
England England



« Reply #15 on: October 17, 2014, 02:54:06 pm »

Would it be hard to build our own  ruin?

Not hard, just pricey.

My new shed, one day, perhaps.........

http://www.chapterhousedesign.co.uk/gothic-garden-folly-abbey-entrance-kit-180-p.asp

Logged

James Harrison
Immortal
**
England England


Bachelor of the Arts; Master of the Sciences


« Reply #16 on: October 17, 2014, 03:33:59 pm »


Would it be hard to build our own  ruin?

Not really; the Georgians managed it (check out Georgian/ early Victorian follies).  This was as a form of theatrical scene-making in gardens and on country estates so generally they were jerry-built (in the extreme in some cases). 

Considering how it is possible to stabilise ruins so they don't decay further it should be perfectly possible to build something that looks like a ruin but is perfectly safe to form a house around. 
Logged
Hurricane Annie
Zeppelin Captain
*****
New Zealand New Zealand



« Reply #17 on: October 17, 2014, 06:59:50 pm »


Would it be hard to build our own  ruin?

Not really; the Georgians managed it (check out Georgian/ early Victorian follies).  This was as a form of theatrical scene-making in gardens and on country estates so generally they were jerry-built (in the extreme in some cases). 

Considering how it is possible to stabilise ruins so they don't decay further it should be perfectly possible to build something that looks like a ruin but is perfectly safe to form a house around. 

 On this side of the world, a colonist ancestor from the 1840s   had a local landmark  property known  in good humour  as "Hughey's Folly". I have only recently uncovered this information  and  am curious as to whether   this was a true stone building  { he was one of the few stone masons that arrived } or if it was some other fools errand  regarding  his property or both.  As yet I have only found the  relative location which has been heavily redeveloped  and the landscape is beyond recognition.

Logged
Rory B Esq BSc
Snr. Officer
****
United Kingdom United Kingdom


« Reply #18 on: October 17, 2014, 09:33:53 pm »

I'd build from scratch, a small home with a large garden.

Regarding 'follies', don't forget to include airship mooring points on the tower !

Anyone can build a ruin, just build it as it should be and wait 6 months. If you want a faster ruin (complete with moss) cover it with yoghurt....that's what they do on historic / ancient buildings to make restoration look old.
Logged
Arabella Periscope
Zeppelin Captain
*****
United States United States


Edwardian summer


« Reply #19 on: October 17, 2014, 10:12:26 pm »



Hez, you made my day with your special long-sleeved jacket for over-enthusiasm.

 

It is so easy in the imagination, isn't it?  I would love a brass Airstream, but I wouldn't like to polish it!
Logged
Stormcat
Officer
***
United States United States


Sir Whiskers, Lord High Mouser and Royal lapwarmer


« Reply #20 on: October 23, 2014, 12:49:47 am »

I happen to live in an area with a "found house parts" store. They have the coolest stuff! old baptismal fonts from churches, unique windows, replica doorknobs, even re-creation tin ceilings. Shouldn't be too hard to Steampunk-ify knowing i've got a place like that to go to!
Logged

Hurricane Annie
Zeppelin Captain
*****
New Zealand New Zealand



« Reply #21 on: October 23, 2014, 02:37:26 am »

I happen to live in an area with a "found house parts" store. They have the coolest stuff! old baptismal fonts from churches, unique windows, replica doorknobs, even re-creation tin ceilings. Shouldn't be too hard to Steampunk-ify knowing i've got a place like that to go to!

 That sounds  groovy! Somewhere one could go to literally  just "window shop"
Logged
Iron Butterfly
Deck Hand
*
United Kingdom United Kingdom


Aka Anton Windersham


« Reply #22 on: October 30, 2014, 10:51:58 am »

You could always go the extra mile and buy your own Victorian 'ghost town' but you're gonna need at least 800 grand to be invited to the table.

https://uk.finance.yahoo.com/news/us-ghost-town-sale-connecticuts-johnsonville-village-being-094815445--finance.html?vp=1
Logged
Rose Inverness
Snr. Officer
****
United States United States


Communing with the Over-soul via you.


WWW
« Reply #23 on: November 01, 2014, 10:52:46 pm »

I happen to live in an area with a "found house parts" store. They have the coolest stuff! old baptismal fonts from churches, unique windows, replica doorknobs, even re-creation tin ceilings. Shouldn't be too hard to Steampunk-ify knowing i've got a place like that to go to!

Oh goodness, how cool! I live near such stores and they are wonderful treasure troves, indeed, though yours sounds even more intriguing.
Logged

That delicate forest flower,   
With scented breath and look so like a smile,   
Seems, as it issues from the shapeless mould,   
An emanation of the indwelling Life,   
A visible token of the upholding Love,   
That are the soul of this great universe.

~William Cullen Bryant

Trains to Steamtown, this way...
Hurricane Annie
Zeppelin Captain
*****
New Zealand New Zealand



« Reply #24 on: November 01, 2014, 11:07:51 pm »



Hez, you made my day with your special long-sleeved jacket for over-enthusiasm.

 

It is so easy in the imagination, isn't it?  I would love a brass Airstream, but I wouldn't like to polish it!



 The top shot would be an amazing project.
Logged
Pages: [1] 2   Go Up
  Print  
 
Jump to:  

Powered by MySQL Powered by PHP Powered by SMF 1.1.20 | SMF © 2013, Simple Machines Valid XHTML 1.0! Valid CSS!
Page created in 0.847 seconds with 15 queries.