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Author Topic: Old words from Webster.  (Read 1061 times)
Maets
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« on: October 16, 2014, 07:44:48 pm »

Here are some old words from Webster.  Just what a steampunk writer might need.  Check them out at
http://www.huffingtonpost.com/paul-anthony-jones/forgotten-words_b_5985494.html

A few samples:

Babblement - senseless prattle
Cycopede - circle of human knowledge
Obambulate - to walk about

Many more at the above link.
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gaslampfantasy
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United Kingdom United Kingdom



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« Reply #1 on: January 05, 2015, 05:59:36 pm »

Nice list. But what about 'dwale' for deadly nightshade, or 'badinage' for humourous banter? I have an A-Z of a few such words at my website,  https://gaslampfantasy.wordpress.com/ Scroll down until you get to JULY 9, 2014, A Life Of Fiction XXXVII. You may have to scroll down quite some way.
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Atterton
Time Traveler
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Only The Shadow knows


« Reply #2 on: January 09, 2015, 12:23:08 pm »

To think all this time I used cycopede to mean a cyclops on a bicycle. Don't I look stupid now.
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Resurrectionist and freelance surgeon.
Antonus Fudge
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« Reply #3 on: January 09, 2015, 02:22:27 pm »

Here are some old words from Webster.  Just what a steampunk writer might need.  Check them out at
http://www.huffingtonpost.com/paul-anthony-jones/forgotten-words_b_5985494.html

A few samples:

Babblement - senseless prattle
Cycopede - circle of human knowledge
Obambulate - to walk about

Many more at the above link.


How perfectly marvellous! I am of the cut that dictates one might also invent words based purely on the way they sound.
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Richard Hoover
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Canada Canada



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« Reply #4 on: January 12, 2015, 03:47:51 pm »

Those are some great words!  Here's a few words/phrases I used in my novel that I picked up from http://freepages.genealogy.rootsweb.ancestry.com/~poindexterfamily/OldWestSlang.html.  There more Western phrases but time period appropriate for what I wrote.
Arbuckle's - slang for coffee from a popular brand of the time
flannel mouth - overly smooth talker
gospel sharp - a preacher

I also recently came across velocipede as a general word for pedal driven vehicles (unicycle, bicycle, dicycle, etc.).
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My novel Satin and Sutherland: The Golden Curse is available now!  Check out my website www.sealeftstudios.com for a sample, trailers, and more.
creagmor
Zeppelin Captain
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South Africa South Africa



« Reply #5 on: January 16, 2015, 05:50:48 pm »

This is a wee bit off topic, but I remember a "josh dicky", as he liked to call himself on a now defunct "top 40" music station. His name was Gary Owens, and was also the "pronouncer" for that wonderful TV show called Laugh In. I hope I'm not the only one that remembers the program that gave us Goldie Hawn, among some sadly forgotten but fun personalities. Excuse me as I seemed to have wandered off track.  Anyway he was great with puns and other types of word play. One word he invented was "insegrevious". He wanted a word that had no definition and could mean whatever one wanted it to. He became involved with a certain dictionary company who said that they would gladly give them a definition. He was unsuccessful in getting them to understand what he was trying to accomplish, and so it obviously it never was included. This gave rise to one of the many oft repeated tag lines, "Look that up in your Funken (sp?) Wagnall! Probably their best known line was "Sock it to me". This was even said on the show by then President  Richard Nixon.     
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“Love is an emotional thing, and whatever is emotional is opposed to that cold true reason which I place above all things.” Sherlock Holmes, in The Sign of Four.
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