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Author Topic: Arts and crafts or Art Nouveau?  (Read 3357 times)
Rory B Esq BSc
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« on: September 09, 2014, 07:44:50 pm »

Which appeals to you more, or does it depend on what it is?

The 'arts and crafts' movement has much in common with some elements of steampunk (from 'craftsmanship' and traditional materials to the idea that something can be both functional and aesthetically pleasing) while art nouveau has a distinctive visual style.

For me both have their place, I like and sometimes emulate the posters of Alfons Mucha, but when creating a 3D piece then the arts and crafts movement is a stronger influence (and having some of my education due to the 'workers educational association', William Morris was a founder, it has a philosophical appeal).

Is there a 'middle ground'? A Kraken has the sinuous lines of art nouveau but can be made with 'arts and crafts' methods and materials.

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VampirateMace
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« Reply #1 on: September 09, 2014, 07:56:30 pm »

I would agree that both have their place, and that it's certainly allowable to cross art styles when making pieces. Of course the results of crosses may not always be as pleasant as you first imagined, but at least you tried. And sometimes what you get is something new and wonderful.

I think sea-life lends well to Art Nouveau lines, so Kraken would probably look nice. Now I'm picturing a Art Nouveau Kraken embossed on a leather handbag, wouldn't that look great?
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Ada Thorold
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« Reply #2 on: September 09, 2014, 08:11:49 pm »

I would say that there is a middle ground, indeed it appears that British art nouveau (Liberty, Mackintosh) was very much mixed up with the arts and crafts movement. I've done quite a bit of reading around that area and the same pieces will be categorised in different styles depending on the author.

Personally I like arts and crafts for big things, furniture, architecture etc and art nouveau for the smaller things; jewellery and vases. The vases in Liberty's collection are stunning.

~A~
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Ada Thorold
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« Reply #3 on: September 09, 2014, 08:15:08 pm »

Although Mackintosh is very high on my favourites the list for furniture and architecture whichever box he gets put in.

~A~
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Rory B Esq BSc
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« Reply #4 on: September 09, 2014, 08:51:35 pm »

'art nouveau' grew out of 'arts and crafts,  so the dividing line is sometimes hard to find (no set date). copper rivets on a brass jug make it 'arts and crafts' while a beautiful piece of cast iron work at a railway station is 'art nouveau'.
What both of these movements have in common with steampunk is a desire to 'be splendid'. and create the best we can.
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James Harrison
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« Reply #5 on: September 09, 2014, 09:16:56 pm »

'art nouveau' grew out of 'arts and crafts,  so the dividing line is sometimes hard to find (no set date). copper rivets on a brass jug make it 'arts and crafts' while a beautiful piece of cast iron work at a railway station is 'art nouveau'.


This is very much the problem with defining and separating art movements.... personally I'm of the opinion Arts and Crafts borrows from both the Pre-Raphaelite movement in art and the Gothic Revival in architecture; the big names of the movement were contemporaries of the likes of Dante Gabriel Rosetti (indeed, he was one of the 'and Company' of William Morris and Company).  The argument can be made that the 'truth to material and construction' tenet of the Gothic Revival was analagous to the 'nothing beautiful that is not functional' tenet of Arts and Crafts- and this link has been made many times. 

It is perhaps easier to define an object as belonging to one or the other dependant upon its date and place of manufacture.  Arts and Crafts was in vogue really from the 1870s through to the 1890s; the term itself does not appear before 1896 and is then referred to as a style lately falling out of fashion.  It is also almost exclusively British and North American.  Art Nouveau picks up in the late 1890s and runs through to about 1910 and tended to be more popular in continental Europe then the UK or North America (however Glasgow is acknowledged as being a centre for Art Nouveau).  Of course this division itself is open to criticism and exceptions....

Stepping away from the purely academic point of view I would say it is plain that both styles share influences, inspirations and characteristics and to that end there is absolutely nothing wrong in mixing, matching and blending them to ones personal taste (something I do a lot of).   
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Rory B Esq BSc
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« Reply #6 on: September 09, 2014, 10:42:22 pm »

I'm not approaching this from an academic (art history) position but rather a 'potential source of inspiration' approach. Trying to find a balance between 'form and function'.
And in the process hopefully giving others clues to what made Victorian items distinctive, what makes something 'look right' for the steampunk period?
I suppose I'm searching for that elusive 'steampunk X factor' that we all seek.

I suspect it's subjective, one person likes rivets and visible signs of how it was made while another doesn't. and if there is some 'secret combination' chances are I'd not be happy working to meet it.

But hopefully a few will explore the creativity of Victorian artists and get new ideas.
(one of my manifestations is a 'dream planter').
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rovingjack
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« Reply #7 on: September 10, 2014, 12:58:23 am »

Art deco, Googie, Streamline Moderne, some Nouveau, maybe a bit of arts and craft, Baroque Revival, a bit of gothic (furnishings and objects more than architecture), With some cyber punk thrown in.

a bit of a melange of these. which in a way is a bit fitting as many times the explosion of art and culture centered around revivalist movements with an eye toward past art and cultural movements. I think the Victorian era is a prime example of that in the sort of cluttered display tables and curio cabinets filled with things from egypts ancient past, through scrimshawed whale teeth, to new electric light bulbs. So you could find a little bit of most of that throughout a victorian home. Some of my list comes after then, but what can I say the transition from steampunk yesterdays future to the theme of raygun gothic and optimistic future has it's appeal.
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pakled
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« Reply #8 on: September 10, 2014, 05:58:40 am »

Arts and Crafts? Make mine Mucha...
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chicar
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« Reply #9 on: September 10, 2014, 02:34:52 pm »

Googled it and it remind me of a mix of european medieval art and japanese estamp, what please particularly my steampunk multiculturalism.
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Extract of the Dreamflesh article ''Path of The Sacred Clown''
Hurricane Annie
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« Reply #10 on: September 13, 2014, 11:48:00 am »

 Down here we have Antipodean Revival  which is rather steamy.


here
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Captain Lyerly
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« Reply #11 on: September 14, 2014, 03:56:52 pm »

Arts and Crafts/Craftsman designs - in my own opinion - are great for "background" for Steampunk settings.  But for straight-out steaminess:



This is Mucha.  This is a jewelry shop in Paris that he designed in 1901 - and it would fit, without any changes at all, into a pure Steampunk setting - this could be a room in Castle Heterodyne, unchanged.

wonderful stuff.


 Cheers!

Chas.
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James Harrison
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« Reply #12 on: September 14, 2014, 04:02:11 pm »

Arts and Crafts/Craftsman designs - in my own opinion - are great for "background" for Steampunk settings.  But for straight-out steaminess:



This is Mucha.  This is a jewelry shop in Paris that he designed in 1901 - and it would fit, without any changes at all, into a pure Steampunk setting - this could be a room in Castle Heterodyne, unchanged.

wonderful stuff.


 Cheers!

Chas.



*Drools*

That.  Absolutely that.  That is what I want.  It's refined and suitably Victorian/ Edwardian-esque without succumbing to that awful 'decor upon decor upon decor' look. 
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Kevin C Cooper Esq
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« Reply #13 on: September 14, 2014, 06:22:10 pm »

Art Nouveau first and foremost. Some Arts & Crafts pieces of course depending on what they are. Ultimately it matters not one jot if you like it. Not a big fan of Macintosh, worship Mucha.
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chicar
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« Reply #14 on: September 15, 2014, 01:12:57 am »

Down here we have Antipodean Revival  which is rather steamy.


here


I fear this link is not working.
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Prof. Cecily
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« Reply #15 on: September 15, 2014, 10:35:06 am »

Arts and Crafts/Craftsman designs - in my own opinion - are great for "background" for Steampunk settings.  But for straight-out steaminess:



This is Mucha.  This is a jewelry shop in Paris that he designed in 1901 - and it would fit, without any changes at all, into a pure Steampunk setting - this could be a room in Castle Heterodyne, unchanged.

wonderful stuff.


 Cheers!

Chas.



Good morning,ladies and gentlemen.

Thanks for bringing this fascinating man and his works to our attention. I now have yet another reason to revisit Paris and visit Prague.

I remain yours,
Prof. Cecily

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J. Wilhelm
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« Reply #16 on: September 15, 2014, 08:34:22 pm »

Arts and Crafts/Craftsman designs - in my own opinion - are great for "background" for Steampunk settings.  But for straight-out steaminess:



This is Mucha.  This is a jewelry shop in Paris that he designed in 1901 - and it would fit, without any changes at all, into a pure Steampunk setting - this could be a room in Castle Heterodyne, unchanged.

wonderful stuff.


 Cheers!

Chas.



I don't know.  While I agree that Jugenstil / Art Nouveau would fit right in with Girl Genius, the thematic base is 100% organic. Asymmetry, and flora-based shapes abound in Art Nouveau, as well as the 1-decade older Arts and Crafts.  The only other contiguous movement which shows more structure and geometry is the American "Prarie School" architectural movement characteristic of Frank Kloyd Wright's early work (1890s-1910s).  On first impression the Prarie School aesthetic is extremely modern, but upon close inspection you will see geometric filigree that rivals the Arts and Craft and Art Nouveau, which is a bit more compatible with the inorganic look of late 19th. C technology.  A much better aesthetic for a Steampunk mad science lab

http://www.prairieschoolarchitecture.com
« Last Edit: September 16, 2014, 01:42:06 am by J. Wilhelm » Logged

MWBailey
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« Reply #17 on: September 15, 2014, 09:56:02 pm »

Both. Art Nouveau is one of my favorite decorative striping (pinstriping) styles, but i also like to add in  other things as well, not just Arts and Crafts.
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« Reply #18 on: September 16, 2014, 05:55:15 pm »

Down here we have Antipodean Revival  which is rather steamy.


here


I think this is what Ms. Annie was trying to link to.?
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Rory B Esq BSc
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« Reply #19 on: September 16, 2014, 07:34:20 pm »

Antipodean revival looks interesting ( a new one for this 'Pom'), I must do more research on it !
(hope it doesn't drive up the prices of items up before you buy them), once you've got them you won't mind the price hitting the roof.

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Ada Thorold
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« Reply #20 on: September 16, 2014, 11:01:57 pm »

I think sea-life lends well to Art Nouveau lines, so Kraken would probably look nice. Now I'm picturing a Art Nouveau Kraken embossed on a leather handbag, wouldn't that look great?

I was digging through some old links and I found this:
http://viola.bz/art-nouveau-jewelry-by-wilhelm-lucas-von-cranach/
Some art nouveau sea-life jewellery. He has done a couple of pieces with our tentacled friends



~A~
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J. Wilhelm
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« Reply #21 on: September 17, 2014, 04:57:35 am »

I think sea-life lends well to Art Nouveau lines, so Kraken would probably look nice. Now I'm picturing a Art Nouveau Kraken embossed on a leather handbag, wouldn't that look great?

I was digging through some old links and I found this:
http://viola.bz/art-nouveau-jewelry-by-wilhelm-lucas-von-cranach/
Some art nouveau sea-life jewellery. He has done a couple of pieces with our tentacled friends



~A~


Straight from one of HP Lovecraft's stories (also contemporary, I believe).  That looks to be a talisman of Azathoth, Daemon Sultan and Nuclear Chaos, at the Centre of the Universe
« Last Edit: September 17, 2014, 05:03:51 am by J. Wilhelm » Logged
Burgess Shale
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« Reply #22 on: September 17, 2014, 11:07:55 pm »

 I gravitate towards Art Nouveau and Jugendstil, particularly the jewelry. Mucha's graphic work is stunning, but his silver designs are just as fascinating. I also recommend doing an image search for the jewelry of Rene Lalique (the dragonfly brooch!), the ceramics of Paul Daschel and Amphora Bohemia and the Reformkleid gown designs of Anna Muthesius and Emile Floge.
« Last Edit: September 17, 2014, 11:17:45 pm by Burgess Shale » Logged

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J. Wilhelm
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« Reply #23 on: September 18, 2014, 04:53:44 am »

Arts and Crafts 1880-1910

Art Nouveau 1890–1910 (Alfonse Mucha)

More Art Nouveau - Glasgow School (Rennie McIntosh)

Prarie School 1893-1920 Frank Lloyd Wright

You can literally see the transition towards Art Deco:

« Last Edit: September 18, 2014, 05:07:26 am by J. Wilhelm » Logged
Captain Lyerly
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« Reply #24 on: September 18, 2014, 03:29:41 pm »

I think sea-life lends well to Art Nouveau lines, so Kraken would probably look nice. Now I'm picturing a Art Nouveau Kraken embossed on a leather handbag, wouldn't that look great?

I was digging through some old links and I found this:
http://viola.bz/art-nouveau-jewelry-by-wilhelm-lucas-von-cranach/
Some art nouveau sea-life jewellery. He has done a couple of pieces with our tentacled friends



~A~


Beautiful stuff - the control and sheer bravado of carving into an opal!  Very nice to see that some of these motifs are most definitely not modern goth inventions.

This must have been Cranach the Very Much Younger.

Cheesy



Chas.
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