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Author Topic: Persona names  (Read 139420 times)
Keith_Beef
Snr. Officer
****
France France


« Reply #1550 on: January 06, 2014, 06:50:32 pm »

My site name is a nickname I was given at Uni; "Beef" was added because it almost rhymes with "Keith".

I've been entertaining the idea of a more "in theme" name for using in meatspace Steampunk meet-ups, if I ever get to one. Preferably something suitably multisyllabic and unpronounceable for the French.  Wink
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--
Keith
Lord Pentecost
Snr. Officer
****
United Kingdom United Kingdom



WWW
« Reply #1551 on: January 20, 2014, 09:14:48 pm »

Pentecost came off the side of an old building in Nottingham, there was a badly timed set of traffic lights there an you had to wait for ages. The building was known as the "Hicking Pentecost Building" and used to be some sort of factory, it was converted to apartments around 10 years ago and marketed just as the "Hicking building", from around then I started using the name Pentecost online. The Lord because of the great Victorian aristocrats turned inventors/innovators.
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"A lot of people never use their initiative because no-one told them to" - Banksy
Amalia Zeichnerin
Deck Hand
*


WWW
« Reply #1552 on: February 06, 2014, 09:00:09 pm »

"Amalia" is a Latin name, as well as a name from High Old German (meaning "the brave" or "the competent one"). "Zeichnerin" is German and translates "female illustrator/graphic artist/drawer". Originally, I combined these names for a Steampunk live action roleplaying character who is an artist. And as I like that character and attended a Steampunk Festival as a portrait artist, I stuck to that name. A funny thing is, that my real name, Andrea, also means "the brave" (in Greek). I didn't know that when I picked "Amalia".
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MeanMachine
Swab

Canada Canada



« Reply #1553 on: February 09, 2014, 07:44:08 pm »

I've been using the MeanMachine name for a while on different forums. It's also the name under which I'm net-publishing (for he time being) my stories.

The origin of the name proper was a random phrase written on a chalkboard in my HighSchool's Cooking Class's kitchen. I don't know what exactly it was reffering to, but the words stuck with me. And it seems apropriate seeing my hobbies involve a lot of mechanical hardware from the years surounding the two world wars.
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Susannah
Gunner
**
United Kingdom United Kingdom


« Reply #1554 on: February 13, 2014, 07:08:28 am »

I struggled with my name and I roped in all sorts of steampunks and others for helped. I actually think The 'others' gave me more help as they were bored of me asking so sorted me out to shut me up!!

I am a spy as this enables me to swap Charecterful / costumes and keep my cover story.
However I did think the best place to start off the spy game was amongst the upper classes - lots of intrigue there. So I of course had to have a title. Then i decided to use lily as this is the original Greek meaning of my own name Susannah (another hidden  code). So lady lily..... The surname really stumped me , however a friend came up with the old engiish surname of Cholmondley. Without looking it up on the internet I challenge you to work out how to pronounce it.

The actual pronouncement is quite different from how it looks and a lovely way to sound Cholmondley. So h was quite settled with that. Much fun to be had with people mis pronouncing it - an if they get it wrong, tbey must be a definite shady character, not of the proper Victorian stock so well worth spying on!

So Lady Lily Cholmondley took shape. Finally I added the initial SIS (secret intelligence service)
. I also decided on an additional password to check those I fraternise with can be trusted. Of course I can't reveal that here - you will have to wait untitled you meet me
!

Regards

Lady Liliy Cholmondley SIS
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NordicWrath
Deck Hand
*
United States United States


I forever swear my loyalty to the queen.


« Reply #1555 on: February 18, 2014, 05:45:08 pm »

Marceil Snowshyne here, captain of "The Fleetfooted Malevolence". My crewmen and I devised the name to remember the ship we first served on, that fell all those years ago. She may be gone, but her spirit lives on.Anyone looking to join a crew can speak to me. If you apply, please state your attributes, your measurements, and finally, your favorite genre of music/ band / song.
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Susannah
Gunner
**
United Kingdom United Kingdom


« Reply #1556 on: February 18, 2014, 07:19:34 pm »

Um - You will be appalled to know I have yet to hear any steampunk music. I am a musician (brass and string ) so play in 'mainstream' orchestras bands and cathedral choirs! but I have to come across and steampunk stuff which I might like. If it's too much like rock - that's not my style - any suggestions
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Captain Lister Maylin
Gunner
**
England England


iannlou
« Reply #1557 on: March 12, 2014, 02:01:35 pm »

I was playing about with a name generator ages ago and it came up with a couple that didn't quite work as they were but when combined created a name 'felt right'.

Also the first name being a nod in the direction of one of the characters on "Red Dwarf" was a bonus (and no, before you all ask, I'm nothing like him).
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Is it supposed to be doing that?
Prof. Comberthwaite
Gunner
**
United Kingdom United Kingdom



« Reply #1558 on: March 20, 2014, 02:44:45 pm »

I have a feeling mine will evolve over time. As a youngster, I was frequently referred to as "Prof". The first part of Comberthwaite comes from a local place name. As that is a very small place, I have appended the Viking place-name suffix of 'thwaite'.

Per the posting above re 'Cholmondeley' - I pass the castle driving to work most days. Small world.
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Prof. Comberthwaite
Ancient Historian | Archeoastronomer | Ethnochronologist
Susannah
Gunner
**
United Kingdom United Kingdom


« Reply #1559 on: March 20, 2014, 09:10:54 pm »

You will have to take a picture of the castle for me. Where abouts is it?
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Prof. Comberthwaite
Gunner
**
United Kingdom United Kingdom



« Reply #1560 on: March 21, 2014, 09:32:22 am »

It's in Cholmondeley, on the A49 south of Beeston. I will try to photograph it tomorrow and then I'll post something here.
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von Corax
Squire of the Lambda Calculus
Board Moderator
Immortal
**
Canada Canada

Prof. Darwin Prætorius von Corax


« Reply #1561 on: March 21, 2014, 09:52:37 pm »

… a friend came up with the old engiish surname of Cholmondley. Without looking it up on the internet I challenge you to work out how to pronounce it.

I've always thought the name Cholmondley (or Cholmondeley) had a very friendly sound to it. Tongue Incidentally, (on the subject of English pronunciation,) I have attended several night courses at a local community college whose name is pronounced as "Featherstone-Haugh."
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By the power of caffeine do I set my mind in motion
By the Beans of Life do my thoughts acquire speed
My hands acquire a shaking
The shaking becomes a warning
By the power of caffeine do I set my mind in motion
The Leverkusen Institute of Paleocybernetics is 5838 km from Reading
Prof. Comberthwaite
Gunner
**
United Kingdom United Kingdom



« Reply #1562 on: March 23, 2014, 11:19:32 pm »

I thought that one was pronounced 'Fan-shaw'?
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von Corax
Squire of the Lambda Calculus
Board Moderator
Immortal
**
Canada Canada

Prof. Darwin Prætorius von Corax


« Reply #1563 on: March 24, 2014, 06:51:43 am »

I thought that one was pronounced 'Fan-shaw'?
Precisely. (Perhaps I should have said, "as Featherstone-Haugh is.")
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Fairley B. Strange
Zeppelin Overlord
*******
Australia Australia


Relax, I've done much dumber things and survived..


WWW
« Reply #1564 on: March 24, 2014, 09:21:46 am »

I thought that one was pronounced 'Fan-shaw'?
Precisely. (Perhaps I should have said, "as Featherstone-Haugh is.")

Ah, the vagaries of english pronounciation.

I almost got away with calling a previous domicile 'Falcolme Hall' until someone realised it wasn't 'Faull-comb'...     Grin
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Choose a code to live by, die by it if you have to.
Camellia Wingnut
Snr. Officer
****
United States Minor Outlying Islands United States Minor Outlying Islands


Take my camel, dear. . . .


« Reply #1565 on: March 31, 2014, 10:21:36 pm »

My Dears,
I have come to the conclusion that the choice of a Steampunk persona name is guided by mysterious forces. I plucked "Camellia Wingnut" out of the air, partly to evoke camels, tea, oddity and metal contraptions. Today I discovered that there is actually a Wingnut Tree, and, further, that it is grown to shade Camellias.
There is a famous one in Dorset, which is where my ancestors on both sides originated. It was brought to England by the First Earl of Ilchester, William Fox Strangways.
And it is so called because of a certain resemblance:

?

C.W.
P.S. Alas, that tree has been cut down because it had rotted. Another near Dorchester recently split down the middle. Should I worry?
http://totallydorset.com/2012/01/11/1474/
http://www.dorsetecho.co.uk/news/9471880.Work_begins_to_cut_down_landmark_tree_at_Abbotsbury_Subtropical_Gardens/
http://www.lewisginter.org/blog/2011/07/30/all-kinds-of-wingnuts/
« Last Edit: March 31, 2014, 10:46:43 pm by Camellia Wingnut » Logged

Take my camel, dear, said my aunt Camellia, climbing down from that animal on her return from high mass. The camel, a white Arabian Dhalur (single hump) from the famous herd of the Ruola tribe, had been a parting present, its saddle-bags stuffed with low-carat [sic] gold and flashy orient gems, from a rich desert tycoon. . . .
creagmor
Zeppelin Captain
*****
South Africa South Africa



« Reply #1566 on: April 09, 2014, 01:01:17 am »

My surname is Stone and as far as I have been able to determine Creagmor is Gaelic for great stone. In my alternate universe I am the chief of a Scottish clan. My full name is His Grace, Ian Arthur MacSeamus, Duke of Creagmor, Laird of *Duntobar, and Captain of Clan Seamus, but am addressed simply as Creagmor. I have tried to follow the Scottish traditions but may have gone a bit awry. While any mistakes I've made can be written off as an interuniversal difference, I would appreciate any more accurate information given.

* i.e. The Fort of the Spring. 
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“Love is an emotional thing, and whatever is emotional is opposed to that cold true reason which I place above all things.” Sherlock Holmes, in The Sign of Four.
Miss Indigo Darling
Officer
***
United States United States


Adventuress


« Reply #1567 on: April 21, 2014, 09:07:03 pm »

I was thinking (always a dangerous enterprise...) and wondered; If the essence of who I am could be represented by a colour, which colour would that be?  I decided upon Indigo, for it is a hue I find to be most appealing. My surname comes directly from the man my grandmother was going to marry, a Mr John Darling. I always loved his name, and according to my grandmother he was a wonderful man. A tragic fate befell them. Mr Darling died before they could be wed. She never forgot him and carried his photo in a gold locket that she always wore around her neck.  I commemorate him by incorporating his name into my persona.
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"Of all the fishes in the sea, my favourite is the bass. He climbs up on the tall sea weed, and slides down on his hands and knees."
Camellia Wingnut
Snr. Officer
****
United States Minor Outlying Islands United States Minor Outlying Islands


Take my camel, dear. . . .


« Reply #1568 on: April 21, 2014, 09:44:32 pm »

My Dear Adventuress,
Oddly enough, my own Grandmother had a second husband called Lovering. Have all these names died out?
Great-Aunt Camellia
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Miss Indigo Darling
Officer
***
United States United States


Adventuress


« Reply #1569 on: April 21, 2014, 10:30:41 pm »

Yes, my dear, I do believe such names are indeed dying out. Wonderful names should be remembered. I felt it was my duty to preserve this good man's name. Also, the opportunity for play on words was too tempting to resist!
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thanksforthetea
Swab

Canada Canada


Mechanic at Josef's Mechanics

thanksforthetea
WWW
« Reply #1570 on: May 07, 2014, 04:41:50 am »

Margaret Kaetsner.

Margaret because my dad's mom is named that, plus it's my middle name and I think it's very beautiful.

Kaetsner because my dad's father was a carpenter by trade, and I couldn't find a good last name until I ran across this one, which is a cabinet maker... Haha.
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Jeory Gray
Deck Hand
*
United States United States



« Reply #1571 on: May 13, 2014, 05:41:08 am »

Jeory just sort of came to me while thinking one night. It just sounded right so I kept it with me. And Gray is simply my favorite color
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anyFairport
Guest
« Reply #1572 on: May 22, 2014, 05:07:55 am »

Fairport is my persona's last name.
From that, punning on "Any port in a storm" was too irresistible. Grin
And if one's going to run and hide, it might as well be to somewhere nice.

-anyFairport
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Springheel Jack
Deck Hand
*
United Kingdom United Kingdom


Past my time, before my prime.


« Reply #1573 on: May 26, 2014, 09:48:30 pm »

My Persona name came about as a result of my love of English folklore characters, For those who haven't heard of moire please read on...

 Spring-heeled Jack is an entity in English folklore of the Victorian era. The first claimed sighting of Spring-heeled Jack was in 1837. Later sightings were reported all over Great Britain and were especially prevalent in suburban London, the Midlands and Scotland.

There are many theories about the nature and identity of Spring-heeled Jack. This urban legend was very popular in its time, due to the tales of his bizarre appearance and ability to make extraordinary leaps, to the point that he became the topic of several works of fiction.

Spring-heeled Jack was described by people who claimed to have seen him as having a terrifying and frightful appearance, with diabolical physiognomy, clawed hands, and eyes that "resembled red balls of fire". One report claimed that, beneath a black cloak, he wore a helmet and a tight-fitting white garment like an oilskin. Many stories also mention a "Devil-like" aspect. Others said he was tall and thin, with the appearance of a gentleman. Several reports mention that he could breathe out blue and white flames and that he wore sharp metallic claws at his fingertips. At least two people claimed that he was able to speak comprehensible English.
he first alleged sightings of Spring-heeled Jack were made in London in 1837 and the last reported sighting is said in most of the secondary literature to have been made in Liverpool in 1904.

According to much later accounts, in October 1837, a girl by the name of Mary Stevens was walking to Lavender Hill, where she was working as a servant, after visiting her parents in Battersea. On her way through Clapham Common, a strange figure leapt at her from a dark alley. After immobilising her with a tight grip of his arms, he began to kiss her face, while ripping her clothes and touching her flesh with his claws, which were, according to her deposition, "cold and clammy as those of a corpse". In panic, the girl screamed, making the attacker quickly flee from the scene. The commotion brought several residents who immediately launched a search for the aggressor, who could not be found.

The next day, the leaping character is said to have chosen a very different victim near Mary Stevens' home, inaugurating a method that would reappear in later reports: he jumped in the way of a passing carriage, causing the coachman to lose control, crash, and severely injure himself. Several witnesses claimed that he escaped by jumping over a 9 ft (2.7 m) high wall while babbling with a high-pitched, ringing laughter.

Gradually, the news of the strange character spread, and soon the press and the public gave him the name "Spring-heeled Jack"

Modern sightings
In the late 1970s, residents of Attercliffe, Sheffield began to complain about a "red-eyed prowler who grabbed women and punched men." The man was said to bound between rooftops and walk down sides of walls.

In south Herefordshire, not far from the Welsh border, a travelling salesman named Marshall claimed to have had an encounter with a similar entity in 1986. The man leaped in enormous, inhuman bounds, passed Mr. Marshall on the road, and slapped his cheek. He wore what the salesman described as a black ski-suit, and Marshall noted that he had an elongated chin.

He was sighted again at an unspecified point after by schoolchildren in west Surrey, who claimed he was "all black, with red eyes and had a funny all in one white suit with badges on it." They also said he could run as fast as a car, and would approach dark haired children and tell them, "I want you."

In February 2012, Scott Martin and his family were travelling home by taxi from Stoneleigh at about 10.30pm, when they saw a "dark figure with no features" run across the road in front of them, before climbing over a 15 ft (4.6 m) roadside bank in "seconds", near Nescot College on the Ewell bypass. The family later likened the figure to the legendary Spring-heeled Jack.

See, I'm here and there. I'm everywhere....
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Inside, we are all machine.
Luy22
Deck Hand
*
United States United States



« Reply #1574 on: June 25, 2014, 03:34:22 pm »

Dex 'wind' Bellino. He's a traveling writer, a vagrant, and later an Aether Nomad.
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