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Author Topic: Miranda's cheapskate Steampunk apparel  (Read 7062 times)
Cora Courcelle
Snr. Officer
****
England England



« Reply #75 on: June 19, 2016, 08:38:15 pm »

Love the boots.
 May I adopt this idea for my own footwear (which tends towards the boringly comfortable) please?
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You have to tread a fine line between avant-garde surrealism and getting yourself sectioned...
Miranda.T
Zeppelin Captain
*****
United Kingdom United Kingdom



« Reply #76 on: June 20, 2016, 06:19:00 pm »

Love the boots.
 May I adopt this idea for my own footwear (which tends towards the boringly comfortable) please?

By all means! Oh, and you can't see it in the picture, but I also knocked a couple of brass tacks in line down the back of the heel, given that as this is steampunk there really should be some brass in there  Cheesy

Yours,
Miranda.

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Prof. Cecily
Snr. Officer
****
Spain Spain



« Reply #77 on: June 28, 2016, 08:17:21 am »

Good morning,ladies and gentlemen.
A perfectly splendid idea!

I remain yours,
Prof. Cecily
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Miranda.T
Zeppelin Captain
*****
United Kingdom United Kingdom



« Reply #78 on: July 03, 2016, 11:22:24 am »

Good morning,ladies and gentlemen.
A perfectly splendid idea!

I remain yours,
Prof. Cecily

Many thanks! They do need a little bit of attention though - one heel cover snapped in half during the event, and I'm hoping that walking around without this hasn't damaged the body of the heel so much it can't be re-heeled - they are hollow inside so I'm a bit worried I was wearing down the thin plastic wall, but I didn't quite feel up to hopping around the rest of the day!

Yours,
Miranda.
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Miranda.T
Zeppelin Captain
*****
United Kingdom United Kingdom



« Reply #79 on: December 23, 2016, 02:45:24 pm »

Christmas is over! Or at least it is according to the shops selling decorations - they are now all in the 'sale' bins. So as I mentioned last year, now is a good time to have a rummage through to see if anything could be used for steamy creations.

A couple of days ago I bought four of these https://www.therange.co.uk/occasions/christmas/christmas-trees/tree-decorations/baubles/3d-snowflake-with-droplet#102442 for not many pennys. They are metal and have are the same design on both back and front meaning the two sides can be separated to make eight pieces. They are going to go around the net overskirt I'm planning to make for my Venice outfit, at the points where the skirt is gathered up into swags. I also bough two of these https://www.therange.co.uk/occasions/christmas/christmas-trees/tree-decorations/baubles/art-deco-tree-tassel-decoration#102508 to make some very dangly earrings.

So, while the sales last, it might be a good idea to have a poke around and see what's on offer.

Yours,
Miranda.
Logged
Miranda.T
Zeppelin Captain
*****
United Kingdom United Kingdom



« Reply #80 on: February 09, 2017, 12:32:45 am »

I'm finally getting on top of our preparations for Venice. One thing I wanted was a fir wrap of some sort (it is after all February and likely to be cold), but the ones I had didn't quite make the grade. So I bought a £15 oversized to give more material to work with) fur from a charity shop:



After some chopping and sewing, it became this:





The first act was to chop off about 40 cm from the botton of the coat (just below the pockets, which are still in the final garment). The inner seam of the sleeves was then cut open as was the coat body seam alongside those, with the bottom part of the armhole seam cut too. The sleeves were them opened up and sewn onto the coat body, making a caplet, aside from a slit at the front at elbow level for my forearms to pass through.

The lining was left as it was aside from cutting off the sleeves at the armhole; this way my arms pass through the lining armholes and then between the outer material and the lining to the slits, this helping to stop the caplet slipping off the shoulders. Talking of the shoulders, a new seam was sewn there as an arc from neck to mid upper arm, rounding off the originally quite square cut.

The collar was cut down to a 5 cm band, the inner face removed and the outer folded over and sewn down. This made the collar semi-rigid to keep it more open at the neck than was the case for the original coat. The material cut from the bottom was then sewn into the neck to make the wide collar, the front of which was folded to make the triangular form and one of the coat's hook and eyes transferred to it, which allowed it to be widened across the chest giving again the more open neck.

At the back collar and coat body were ruffled up and hand sewn to give the ridged effect. All that then remained was to hand sew the lining to the outer body.

Hopefully it will be nice and warm if the Venice temperatures stick at the current 6 Celsius...

Yours,
Miranda.
« Last Edit: February 09, 2017, 12:41:45 am by Miranda.T » Logged
Miranda.T
Zeppelin Captain
*****
United Kingdom United Kingdom



« Reply #81 on: February 10, 2017, 12:21:39 am »

One thing about being a cheapskate is that I try to reuse things. So as I was thinking about headwear for the Venice trip I decided that rather than a hat I'd try to do some 'statement' hair using the wig I made up for last Halloween (http://brassgoggles.co.uk/forum/index.php/topic,46829.msg975613.html#msg975613). So, with the help of about a hundred clips and pins, this is the result:





The things on the back are the Christmas decorations picked up cheaply at the start of January, mentioned a few posts above. I found the two halves of the round ones were joined together at the tips of the six points of their 'snowflake', and, with a bit of work with pliers, they could be broken apart. I did this for five of their tips, leaving the sixth as a 'hinge' by which to open the decoration like a clamshell. Locks of the wig could then be wound around inside each decoration and the two halves pushed back together to hold it in place, followed by a load of hairpins to secure them on the wig. The heart one at the very back is sewn onto a hair 'doughnut' which itself was clipped to the wig and covered by further strands from it.

Oh, and I've sewn four hair combs to the inside to help secure the whole thing in place, as there's quite a bit of weight to it now and I was worried I might become a victim of Newton's first law (I might swiftly turn my head and the wig might have stayed in exactly the same place...)

Yours,
Miranda.
Logged
Cora Courcelle
Snr. Officer
****
England England



« Reply #82 on: February 12, 2017, 07:03:12 pm »

There should be an award for best and most ingenious repurposing of items so we can give it to you my dear Miranda.  These are inspired.
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Miranda.T
Zeppelin Captain
*****
United Kingdom United Kingdom



« Reply #83 on: February 12, 2017, 08:21:31 pm »

There should be an award for best and most ingenious repurposing of items so we can give it to you my dear Miranda.  These are inspired.

Thank you! I'm hoping to get some better pictures in natural light when they get their proper outing next week - the flash was a bit harsh and the synthetic fibres of both coat and wig a bit too reflective to get properly decent piccys.

Yours,
Miranda.
Logged
Miranda.T
Zeppelin Captain
*****
United Kingdom United Kingdom



« Reply #84 on: February 13, 2017, 12:52:38 am »

Can you imagine this conversation with an airline company?

"Right, so we've got the hold and carry on allowance clarified. Now, what's your size limit for hoop skirts - are they OK under two metres...?"

No, me neither. Now, as mentioned a few pages ago I made my hoop skirt using thin plastic pipe* (10 mm) with the idea that they would be removable and be coiled up into a smaller size if needed. Now I hadn't needed to try that until now, as it just fits into the base of the boot of our car with a bit of a squeeze. The three biggest hoops do need to be removed, though, to fit into a suitcase.

However, when I came to remove these I hit a problem. I'd used stop-ends to join them, but these of course are designed to be a watertight fit so they were a devil of a game to undo (eventually requiring pliers and a screwdriver to lever them out). So, a change of plan was needed, and it was one that was stupidly simple. I just used a length of wider pipe (15 mm), glued to one end of the hoop, with the other slipping into it after going around the channel in the skirt:



I had to open the seam of the skirt a bit to give enough slack to fit the free end into the larger tube, and then this gap is closed by a press-stud, giving the tension needed to hold the hoop in place. It seems to have worked fine - the skirt is now coiled up in a case ready for the flight.

Yours,
Miranda.

* Looking around Ba g couple of months ago, I found a thread from a few years back about historical dressing. One writer was very disparaging about using pipes as hoops (and I though I was being so original when I came up with the idea three years or so ago  Wink), and if they were still active here I think it might be parasol duelling at dawn. However, I agree completely if you are dressing in an authentic historical fashion, but of course mine is not being used with an outfit which has any pretense of historical accuracy. And you never know, if the Victorians has been a bit more advanced in their understanding of polymers they might have produced an alternative to steel hoops; after all, they'd already replaced whale bone with steel in corsets, so if there had been a suitable plastic alternative they might have used it.
Logged
Prof. Cecily
Snr. Officer
****
Spain Spain



« Reply #85 on: February 15, 2017, 01:39:33 am »

I'm finally getting on top of our preparations for Venice. One thing I wanted was a fir wrap of some sort (it is after all February and likely to be cold), but the ones I had didn't quite make the grade. So I bought a £15 oversized to give more material to work with) fur from a charity shop:



After some chopping and sewing, it became this:





Good evening, ladies and gentlemen.
So. so perfect.

I remain yours,
Prof. Cecily

The first act was to chop off about 40 cm from the botton of the coat (just below the pockets, which are still in the final garment). The inner seam of the sleeves was then cut open as was the coat body seam alongside those, with the bottom part of the armhole seam cut too. The sleeves were them opened up and sewn onto the coat body, making a caplet, aside from a slit at the front at elbow level for my forearms to pass through.

The lining was left as it was aside from cutting off the sleeves at the armhole; this way my arms pass through the lining armholes and then between the outer material and the lining to the slits, this helping to stop the caplet slipping off the shoulders. Talking of the shoulders, a new seam was sewn there as an arc from neck to mid upper arm, rounding off the originally quite square cut.

The collar was cut down to a 5 cm band, the inner face removed and the outer folded over and sewn down. This made the collar semi-rigid to keep it more open at the neck than was the case for the original coat. The material cut from the bottom was then sewn into the neck to make the wide collar, the front of which was folded to make the triangular form and one of the coat's hook and eyes transferred to it, which allowed it to be widened across the chest giving again the more open neck.

At the back collar and coat body were ruffled up and hand sewn to give the ridged effect. All that then remained was to hand sew the lining to the outer body.

Hopefully it will be nice and warm if the Venice temperatures stick at the current 6 Celsius...

Yours,
Miranda.
Logged
Miranda.T
Zeppelin Captain
*****
United Kingdom United Kingdom



« Reply #86 on: February 15, 2017, 06:51:24 pm »


Good evening, ladies and gentlemen.
So. so perfect.

I remain yours,
Prof. Cecily


Thank you! How is your 18th century style muff progressing? I had originally planned to turn the lower cut off section into a muff before I realised it would work much better as a collar.

Yours,
Miranda.

Logged
Miranda.T
Zeppelin Captain
*****
United Kingdom United Kingdom



« Reply #87 on: May 30, 2017, 11:40:32 am »

The recent conversation on another thread around the difficulty of negotiating modern life whilst wearing hoops, crinolines etc. inspired me to make a new item - the convenience bustle, which can be easily and quickly taken on and off as the occasion demands. Very simply, this consists of a couple of hoops very firmly attached to a stout belt, thus allowing the item to be put on or taken off.

Here's the bustle from the back:



The green material is the skirt from a dress and the black chiffon from window netting, both charity shop purchases. Underneath the material is:



The two hoops are made from the snap-in top from plastic conduit reinforced by 10 mm plastic pipe. The lower hoop is covered by wrapped around ribbon and the pad for the upper hoop is foam taken from a mattress that was to be thrown out.

The belt from the front:



This was an old belt from which the buckle had broken. To hold it in place thumb turns have been used and picture hangers hand-riveted through the leather from which to hang off various accessories.

Here's how the hoops were connected at the back:



This is with the hoops detached; the angle bracket pushes into the plastic conduit, which has been riveted to the belt, with a bolt and washer to hold it firmly in place.

It is pretty quick and easy to put on and take off, and fairly light to wear too. The next thing to be added is a way to hang my bustle bag underneath it.

Yours,
Miranda.
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Miranda.T
Zeppelin Captain
*****
United Kingdom United Kingdom



« Reply #88 on: November 13, 2017, 12:15:34 am »

Imagine the scene. The poor garment is tossed on the sale rail, a paultry £5 being asked for it, just a few days from the skip. What had it done to deserve this? Well, its side zip was was broken, the top two of its six elasticated straps which held together its back are ripped out from the garment (it was backless right down to the waist, the garment being held on by the aforementioned straps meeting at a metal ring in the centre of the back), it has no straps over the shoulder so you'd spend all your time wearing it hitching it back up, and, possibly worst of all, although it is marked as a 14 that seemed to correspond, at least across the bust, to a possible age of the wearer rather than a dress size. So, best to walk straight past then?

Well, maybe not... The material of the dress had an interesting crinkled texture and was a rather nice shade of blue. The skirt was short but very full, with a little netting underneath. It could go over short tutu style petticoats or be an overskirt for a longer, fully round skirt. And that detail of the metal ring at the back hints at steamyness... So, £5 later it's on the dressmaking table for some alteration.

The zip was taken out and the side sewn up. To allow it to actually be put on, the seam at the back of the skirt was opened up and then a row of hook and eyes added to close this. The top was cut down to below the bust, resolving the problem of the tightness there. All of the straps were removed and two of them joined on each side to give more length, this going from the top of the back to the ring, which was now moved to just below the nape of the neck. The other two were re-purposed to go over the shoulders; to give more length here to go down to the lowered bust line the ribbon inside the dress (which was there to hold it on the hanger) was used. Also, metal split rings were added at the front (to echo the ring at the back) and the straps attached to this by spring hooks.

Here's the front now:



And the back:



This is over several tutu style petticoats and the black top underneath it it a bargain from TK-Maxx. You can just about see it over a longer skirt in my recent Whitby picture here http://brassgoggles.co.uk/forum/index.php/topic,35457.msg987318.html#msg987318.

My current project is based on some lovely red curtains picked up from a charity shop a few weeks ago. I'd like to make a coat with a close fitting top but very full skirt from these. I'm currently combining the patterns from a short dress and a full-skirted wedding pattern for this:



The pattern on the left is one of the original sections from the short dress, the one on the right one of the panels for the coat (there will be four of these on each side). However, whilst the curtains are 90" by 50", this will still be very tight for the pattern so it will need some care in positioning to fit all the panels and sleeves. Anyway, more on this as it progresses.

Yours,
Miranda.
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J. Wilhelm
╬ Admiral und Luftschiffengel ╬
Board Moderator
Immortal
**
United States United States


Sentisne fortunatum punkus? Veni. Diem meum comple


WWW
« Reply #89 on: November 13, 2017, 06:56:42 am »

Imagine the scene. The poor garment is tossed on the sale rail, a paultry £5 being asked for it, just a few days from the skip. What had it done to deserve this? Well, its side zip was was broken, the top two of its six elasticated straps which held together its back are ripped out from the garment (it was backless right down to the waist, the garment being held on by the aforementioned straps meeting at a metal ring in the centre of the back), it has no straps over the shoulder so you'd spend all your time wearing it hitching it back up, and, possibly worst of all, although it is marked as a 14 that seemed to correspond, at least across the bust, to a possible age of the wearer rather than a dress size. So, best to walk straight past then?

Well, maybe not... The material of the dress had an interesting crinkled texture and was a rather nice shade of blue. The skirt was short but very full, with a little netting underneath. It could go over short tutu style petticoats or be an overskirt for a longer, fully round skirt. And that detail of the metal ring at the back hints at steamyness... So, £5 later it's on the dressmaking table for some alteration.

The zip was taken out and the side sewn up. To allow it to actually be put on, the seam at the back of the skirt was opened up and then a row of hook and eyes added to close this. The top was cut down to below the bust, resolving the problem of the tightness there. All of the straps were removed and two of them joined on each side to give more length, this going from the top of the back to the ring, which was now moved to just below the nape of the neck. The other two were re-purposed to go over the shoulders; to give more length here to go down to the lowered bust line the ribbon inside the dress (which was there to hold it on the hanger) was used. Also, metal split rings were added at the front (to echo the ring at the back) and the straps attached to this by spring hooks.

Here's the front now:



And the back:



This is over several tutu style petticoats and the black top underneath it it a bargain from TK-Maxx. You can just about see it over a longer skirt in my recent Whitby picture here http://brassgoggles.co.uk/forum/index.php/topic,35457.msg987318.html#msg987318.

My current project is based on some lovely red curtains picked up from a charity shop a few weeks ago. I'd like to make a coat with a close fitting top but very full skirt from these. I'm currently combining the patterns from a short dress and a full-skirted wedding pattern for this:



The pattern on the left is one of the original sections from the short dress, the one on the right one of the panels for the coat (there will be four of these on each side). However, whilst the curtains are 90" by 50", this will still be very tight for the pattern so it will need some care in positioning to fit all the panels and sleeves. Anyway, more on this as it progresses.

Yours,
Miranda.


Over here it's called "T. J. Maxx"  Tongue

Not the same thing, but it really reminded me of the ballerina dress designed by Travis Banton for Lousie Brooks in the 1929 movie "The Canary Murder Case." Brooks was playing a showgirl who gets murdered when she tries to blackmail a patron. I ignore what the letter "G" stands for (for a moment I though it was a varsity thing  Grin Cheesy Hey, don't knock it, it could have been...  Roll Eyes )



« Last Edit: November 13, 2017, 06:58:20 am by J. Wilhelm » Logged

Miranda.T
Zeppelin Captain
*****
United Kingdom United Kingdom



« Reply #90 on: November 13, 2017, 06:39:29 pm »


Over here it's called "T. J. Maxx"  Tongue

Not the same thing, but it really reminded me of the ballerina dress designed by Travis Banton for Lousie Brooks in the 1929 movie "The Canary Murder Case." Brooks was playing a showgirl who gets murdered when she tries to blackmail a patron. I ignore what the letter "G" stands for (for a moment I though it was a varsity thing  Grin Cheesy Hey, don't knock it, it could have been...  Roll Eyes )




That is a nice little outfit (maybe minus the 'G' though...) Unfortunately (for me) you'd need to be stick thin to carry it off  Undecided

Yours,
Miranda.
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J. Wilhelm
╬ Admiral und Luftschiffengel ╬
Board Moderator
Immortal
**
United States United States


Sentisne fortunatum punkus? Veni. Diem meum comple


WWW
« Reply #91 on: November 13, 2017, 07:49:12 pm »


Over here it's called "T. J. Maxx"  Tongue

Not the same thing, but it really reminded me of the ballerina dress designed by Travis Banton for Lousie Brooks in the 1929 movie "The Canary Murder Case." Brooks was playing a showgirl who gets murdered when she tries to blackmail a patron. I ignore what the letter "G" stands for (for a moment I though it was a varsity thing  Grin Cheesy Hey, don't knock it, it could have been...  Roll Eyes )




That is a nice little outfit (maybe minus the 'G' though...) Unfortunately (for me) you'd need to be stick thin to carry it off  Undecided

Yours,
Miranda.

Yes, she had a fantastic figure. There's another picture of her wearing the same or similar dress without the G. Often wonder what it would have been like to meet her in person in the 1920s. According to her autobiography she was very much a wild child. She couldn't adapt to movies with sound, and being the prototypical flapper, she ended up alone and poor, later to be found in a cheap hotel by some Hollywood mogul. He pushed her to write her own biography and attend a number of interviews, which made her good money towards the end of her life.
« Last Edit: November 13, 2017, 07:52:55 pm by J. Wilhelm » Logged
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