The Steampunk Forum at Brass Goggles
November 21, 2017, 03:40:37 am *
Welcome, Guest. Please login or register.
Did you miss your activation email?

Login with username, password and session length
News: Support BrassGoggles! Donate once or $3/mo.
 See details here.
 
   Home   Blog Help Rules Login Register  
Pages: [1] 2 3 4   Go Down
  Print  
Author Topic: Miranda's cheapskate Steampunk apparel  (Read 7038 times)
Miranda.T
Zeppelin Captain
*****
United Kingdom United Kingdom



« on: August 21, 2014, 07:57:05 pm »

Hello ladies and gentlemen,
In what I would expect to be a very occasional series, I though I'd share a a few thoughts on making Stempunk clothing, as the title suggests, on the cheap. I did think of puting into the exististing thread on obtaining clothing with no money, but as all the entires will have required some investment, and usually some sewing, I felt a separate thread might be more appropriate.

Starting off with some hats made for Stempunk and Victoriana events:



The hat on the far left is my daughter's creation. She produced the cardboard pattern herself (she's clever like that), and it's covered in offcuts from the material used to make one of her outfits for Whitby. Most of the decoration, like all the hats, is just bits and pieces we have saved over time - straps and threads from old bags, decorations off Christmas and birthday cards, ribbons and bows from e.g. Christmas crackers, things like that. A few other bits have been bought from charity shops for a pound or so here and there (decorated hair slides, chokers, etc.)

Middle back is another of my daughter's creations. The hat was charity shop, a few pounds, and the flowers partly recyled from a family wedding, some made from material off-cuts.

Back right is my specifically Steampunk hat. Again, a cheap chraity shop buy, although it started off the wrong colour - navy. A very light coating with using a 'Plasticoat' spray sorted that out. The watch is not permanently attached, but rather held in with an elasticated band, as it gets moved between outfits.

Front right is a mini-tricorn made for a Whitby weekend, using the pattern to be found here http://www.fleecefun.com/make-mini-pirate-hat-or-mini-tricorn-hat.html

Finally, front left is the latest creation for this weekend's Victorian festival. The central part is a mini-pringles tube, shortened and sprayed black, then covered with material. The base is the same as for the tricorn hat. The fluffy wool used to give bulk to the back and front was another charity shop find, just £1. I tired a different approach to adding the material for this one. I've always found that for a thin material, such as used for this hat, gluing it onto the cardboard base never gave a good appearnce; too many wrinkes. This time, after gluing on a first layer of material, I tied sewing on another over the top, and that worked quite well. I used the same idea to do the top of the hat - this time sewing straight onto the Pringle tub's plastic lid. Oh, and the material to cover this was from a pillow case cover, again cheap from the charity shop.

Next entry should be about my new hooped skirt, but I'm trying it out at the weekend to see how well it works. I just hope the hotel has nice, wide doors...

Yours,
Miranda.

Edit: A better picture of the latest hat - it got a bit lost in the group.

« Last Edit: January 02, 2015, 12:01:14 am by Miranda.T » Logged
Otto Von Pifka
Zeppelin Admiral
******
United States United States


goggles? they're here somewhere.....


« Reply #1 on: August 23, 2014, 04:48:38 am »

very nice and the perfect budget!

I like them all.

Logged
Rory B Esq BSc
Snr. Officer
****
United Kingdom United Kingdom


« Reply #2 on: August 24, 2014, 10:46:14 am »

Your daughter could have a nice little sideline going with the hats, possibly selling the cardboard patterns for people to build their own hats on. Hat-kit kind of thing.

The finished product looks good, Having the watch on an elasticated band is a good idea, can it be worn as a choker type thing?

A talent for making something clearly runs in the family.
Logged
Abracabella
Deck Hand
*
United Kingdom United Kingdom


All stars are there to shine!


WWW
« Reply #3 on: August 25, 2014, 05:26:12 pm »

I am very impressed! I think there is a lot of talent in this family!  Grin
Logged

Cogs and wheels and sprockets and springs
Metal and leather and beautiful things
Brass sculpted treasures, copper and lead
Your ideas are alive, though your century's dead

Miranda.T
Zeppelin Captain
*****
United Kingdom United Kingdom



« Reply #4 on: August 25, 2014, 07:22:51 pm »

Many, many thanks everyone for the very kind comments - from my daughter too. I should be posting up in 'Tactile' the work she's done on her 'gun' for The Asylum soon, and hopefully in time for Halloween the 'Vampire and Werewolf Hunting Kit' both my daughters are putting together.

Yours,
Miranda.
Logged
Miranda.T
Zeppelin Captain
*****
United Kingdom United Kingdom



« Reply #5 on: August 25, 2014, 09:52:28 pm »

Dear Ladies and Gentlemen,
This installment - a hooped skirt.


Apologies for the slightly blurry picture - our camera can sometimes decides it doesn't want to focus, and it's not too obvious on its screen there's been a problem (although some might say its appropriate, as I'm quite a blurry person...)

The need for this came from my eldest daughter 'growing into', with the aid of safety pins to narrow the waist, my 12-layer petticoat (48 m of netting in there). I made this one a long time ago (actually B.C. - Before Children), and to be honest I didn't feel I had either the money or the time to make another like it, although I knew I needed a replacement if my daughter was to be using the original. Hence the choice to make a hooped skirt.

The material for this was from - you guessed it - the chaity shop; a £4 cotton double douvet cover. I used a commercial pattern I've had hanging around in my patterns file for ages, but you could easily make up a pattern for yourself. As you can see from the picture, it's basically made up from a set of rectangular strips; 6 for this one. The top of each is gathered to attach to previous one (or to make the waist at the top), and the bottom is turned over into a casing (tube) for the hoop. To get the bell shape you could either work out the curve you wanted mathematically, or just get a sheet of paper and draw out the shape you want. Divide the curve vertically into the number of sections you want to give the depth of each rectangle (but add about 5 cm/2 inches extra for the casing), and then measure the distance from the centre line (use your desired waist measurement to get this) to the curve at the bottom of each rectangle to allow its length to be found from the formula for the circumference of a circle - 2 x pi x radius (but allow for seam allowance). Given the lengths of the rectangles and the duvet, I had to make each of them them in two sections (so each was a half-circle).

I guessed spring steel for the hoops might be a bit expensive, so I used the smallest diameter plastic plumbing pipe (10 mm size). Unfortunately, as I needed to make this quickly for the weekend just gone by, I didn't have time to shop around and had to by a 25 m reel from a DIY warehouse, costing £27; a lot more than I'd planned, but there is enough left over to make a second skirt, as as my daughter would like one too now, it will not go to waste. With more time, I'm sure a shorter and cheaper length could be purchased. The tube was a bit too tightly curled when first bought, so after I'd fed it into the casings, to get it to take up the right shape I laid out the skirt and its hoops flat, put a piece of board over the top of it, a few heavy items of top of that, and left it overnight. I used the tubing for the first five sections - for the bottom section, I just put in a length of flexible wire (recycled from some defunct Christmas lights) to give it a bit of weight. At the waist is just a drawstring to tie (obviously a casing is needed for this).

The bottom section was a bit of an afterthought. The pattern came up a bit short on me, and I'd thought I had some big skirts, but I currently only have one that will fit over the hooped skirt, and that kept on riding up showing the white material (the skirt is black); the 'pelmet' of black material on the hooped skirt solved that. For the final effect, please see my post today on the 'Playing dress-up' thread.

Next time, hopefully before Halloween as I need it for then, I'm hoping to post up a plush jacket made from a £12 throw from Tesco - if it goes to plan...

Yours,
Miranda.
« Last Edit: August 25, 2014, 09:58:29 pm by Miranda.T » Logged
Miranda.T
Zeppelin Captain
*****
United Kingdom United Kingdom



« Reply #6 on: September 15, 2014, 10:48:30 pm »

Good evening ladies and gentlemen,
In a slight change of plan, this installment documents sewing up a quick and easy bustle.

After the Victorian event at the end of August, the realisation dawned on me that there was no hope of wearing the hooped skirt to the Asylum, as I didn't think I would fit into the taxi, let alone the rest of the family! However, I thought my big petticoat was still going to be being used by my daughter (although, in the end, she decided to borrow a much shorter one), so I needed a replacement quickly. I've always had a hankering to try a bustle skirt, so it was time for a quick bit of sewing.

The bustle itself is a basically a gathered train that fits over the back of a full skirt. Luckily I had a suitable skirt in the wardrobe in gold (bought in a sale some while ago). It has its own slight tain that can drops to the floor, but I pinned this up to avoid providing a road sweeping service for Lincoln; this had the effect of starting the bustle shape. As for the bustle itself, a rummage through the offcuts box provided three pieces of material; two of a satin appearance (one burgandy, the other black) and a white cotton. I decided to make a reversible bustle, one side balck and the other red, to maximise the range of outfits it could be used for. The white cotton was to be inner layer (the 'stay'), to give fullness, structure and weight.

The rectangles of black and red material needed to be cut as long as possible (certainly longer than the skirt; with the material I had available I managed about a quarter of the skirt's length again, although ideally it would have been closer to a half again to give more scope for gathering), and its width about as wide as the waist of the skirt (to again allow for gather). I used the shape of the skirt's bottom as a template to cut the end of the bustle, and tapered the sides in a little towards the top:



In the image above, the three pieces of material are folded in the middle. The white inner later was made just the length of the skirt; this 'stay' would help shape the folds of the bustle, and the red and black layers were gathered and sewed along their length onto it (three gathers down the length, biggest at the top, right-sides together for stitching with the top seam left open for turning).

Turning it the right way round trough the top, the top edge was then gathered and sewed onto a waist band, the length of which was about a third of the width of the skirt's waist. This could be made up from strip of material, but as the black offcut was from a duvet (again!), I just used the band from the top of that, which already had three button-holes in it. All I then had to do was add three buttons to the inside waist band of the skirt (inside so the skirt can still be worn without the bustle); I even recycled the buttons from the duvet  Wink

Under the skirt I was wearing one of my existing petticoats. To make the bustle 'cushion' was dead easy; I just used a net bag bought from boots (which is sold for keeping children's toys  together in the bathroom). This was just stuffed with netting (again from the offcuts box) to give:



This was just pinned to the inside of the petticoat with safety-pins.

The final effect was this:



The fullness was enhanced by pinning my ruffled wrap to the botton of my bodice as a final top layer.

The bustle took a couple of evenings to make, so not to tricky a project for anyone who's just starting up on sewing outfits.

Yours,
Miranda.
Logged
Prof. Cecily
Snr. Officer
****
Spain Spain



« Reply #7 on: September 16, 2014, 12:19:20 pm »

Good afternoon, ladies and gentlemen.
How grateful I am for your posts, Miranda.T; they are inspirational and easy to follow.
I'm looking forward to seeing more of your work, indeed.

I remain yours,
Prof. Cecily
 
Logged
Miranda.T
Zeppelin Captain
*****
United Kingdom United Kingdom



« Reply #8 on: October 30, 2014, 04:08:37 pm »

Goodday Ladies and Gentleman,
This entry is to document the production of a new, warm and inexpensive jacket ready for Halloween. The jacket itself needed to be useable for Steampunk, Victorian and Gothic wear, and needed to be able to fit over very full skirts (up to and including my hooped skirt), which is the issue (aside from cost) for off-the-peg jackets; they just do not give enough fullness below the waist.

The materials for this were a thick black cotton for the lining (I'm sure you can guess the source of this Tongue), and the outer material taken from a rather plush short pile black throw blanket bought from Tesco for £12. The main issue was not having a pattern, or being able to find a pattern, which was exactly how I wanted. So I decided it was to be an amalgam of several I already had in stock. The basic structure is a fairly standard lady's jacket, but with the neckline from here http://www.google.co.uk/url?q=http://sewing.patternreview.com/Patterns/3368&sa=U&ei=z09SVP_8LefY7Aa16YCIBQ&ved=0CCoQFjAG&usg=AFQjCNF-FpDSNYMfOo6Uv0FMmI41iHkxTg, the sleeve caps from a further pattern (no longer available), lower sleeves from here https://www.google.co.uk/search?q=butterick+6593&biw=973&bih=397&tbm=isch&tbo=u&source=univ&sa=X&ei=p1BSVMLSMaLA7Aal7ID4BA&ved=0CEoQsAQ, and a round full skirt below the waist (a half-length version of a 1950s 'swing' skirt).

So how to put these dispirate pieces together? After cutting the original pattern pieces to size I then made up my own pattern on baking parchment by overlaying and then tracing out the relevent sections of the originals and blending them together at the 'joins'. After this I should have made up a test version of the garment using a cheap material, but as I did't have time for this I made up the lining first, with the thought that any mistakes would then be hidden. As it turned out, the fit was pretty good from the offset, with just a little alteration, transferred back to my pattern before the outer material was made up.

The final garment, from and back:



Hopefully I'll get some pictures of it being worn this weekend.

Yours,
Miranda.

Edit: This is similar to the jacket pattern used (which seems to be out of print):
http://www.google.co.uk/url?sa=t&rct=j&q=&esrc=s&source=web&cd=1&cad=rja&uact=8&ved=0CDYQFjAA&url=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.simplicity.com%2Fp-7755-misses-jackets-project-runway-collection.aspx&ei=355TVKm8EqaIsQS984GYAw&usg=AFQjCNFNNwy_n14bc-zPWgqP4T971DlqsQ&bvm=bv.78677474,d.cWc
The sleeve caps are similar to the ones here: http://www.google.co.uk/url?sa=t&rct=j&q=&esrc=s&source=web&cd=1&cad=rja&uact=8&sqi=2&ved=0CEAQFjAA&url=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.simplicity.com%2Fp-9586-misses-steampunk-costume.aspx&ei=y59TVJLCDu_esAS9yYHYCQ&usg=AFQjCNHRsNRek6ZCWlwUl6cOqxI2arrHWA&bvm=bv.78677474,d.cWc
« Last Edit: October 31, 2014, 03:47:22 pm by Miranda.T » Logged
Drew P
Zeppelin Admiral
******
United States United States


« Reply #9 on: November 01, 2014, 03:22:21 am »

That's a fantastic style of jacket!!!
Logged

Never ask 'Why?'
Always ask 'Why not!?'
Prof. Cecily
Snr. Officer
****
Spain Spain



« Reply #10 on: November 02, 2014, 12:59:16 am »

Good evening, ladies and gentlemen.
What a lovely idea, using a plush blanket  as a source of fabric.
The Frankensteined pattern seems to me to be brilliant, I'm looking forward to seeing the photos of you wearing the finished garment.
I remain yours,
Prof. Cecily
Logged
Miranda.T
Zeppelin Captain
*****
United Kingdom United Kingdom



« Reply #11 on: November 02, 2014, 03:30:25 pm »

Many thanks for the kind words! I've posted a picture of the jacket 'in action' over on the 'Playing dress up' thread as part of my Haloween outfit; appropriate, as it was, as noted,  very much a 'Frankenstein' of a consruction.

By the way, looking back at the post I don't know if the pattern-making part was very clear or not. To be honest, I didn't post any WIP images as I wasn't totally convinced it would work. If anyone would like any images of the pattern-making process, please do say; otherwise, it's onto the next project, something quick and easy for the 'Steampunks in Space' event.

Yours,
Miranda.
Logged
Miranda.T
Zeppelin Captain
*****
United Kingdom United Kingdom



« Reply #12 on: January 15, 2015, 12:16:52 am »

Good evening ladies and gentlemen,
The origin of this installment came from a really quite warm Asylum, where I was not the only person to find themselves a little uncomfortably warm. The issue was, of course, too many layers, and the solution alost stupidly simple, but I thought it might be worth sharing it in a quick post as we are are the road back to warmer weather (although it may not feel like it right at the moment...)

So the solution is to cut down on the layers, but then how do you achieve the look of a blouse underneath an (underbust) corset? Simple: replace the blouse with just a bra.



The bra pictured cost just £4 from 'Primark', but I though it looked the part and has a nice deep band under the cups which goes underneath the top of the corset. To stop them drifiting apart, you will see I've added some suitably (I hope) decorative buttons. These go though some cord loops sewn to the inside of the corset (which can be tucked away inside when this combination is not being worn).

So, one less layer on the top half of the body and hopefully a sartorially pleasing result.

Yours,
Miranda.
Logged
Miranda.T
Zeppelin Captain
*****
United Kingdom United Kingdom



« Reply #13 on: January 17, 2015, 08:54:48 pm »

Now, with above the waist cool enough it would be silly if the bottom half was swealtering. So, what are the options there?

One possibility is a crinoline cage skirt. I discovered over the summer (having just finished making one, as noted earlier in this thread) that these are remarkably cool, giving plenty of room for the air to circulate around the legs. However, they do of course have one rather major disadvantage; they are impossible to wear if one has to tavel by car (short of putting it on when the destination was reached, which would require some kind of shelter to act as a changing cubicle; I'm working on that one...)

The other possibility is to wear a shorter skirt, but there is no reason such a thing should not be suitably steampunk, or that difficult to aquire.



The skirt above was purchased from a high-street outlet (in the sales, of course), and started off as a full circle, just below the knee design. Not terribly interesting in itself, but I thought the colour would work well and I liked the ruffle detail along the bottom.

As this picture shows, to add some interest the front has been drawn up into a pinny style. This was done by picking up the material on both sides about 2/3 of the way from the front to the back and just above ruffle, and bringing this up to tack about an inch below the waist, as shown in the next picture:



In the above the back of the skirt is on the left.

Then, the remaining material at the back was gathered up:



This was done by picking up the skirt in the same was as desribed above, in two points on both sides of the centre back which were equally spaced between the centre back and the previous tack. I should say that the positioning was first tried out with safety pins before being sewn into place.

This is worn over a very full but short petticoat (actually more like a tutu) and a knee-length, full black skirt what has a net outer layer (again, just a few pounds worth from a low cost high street outlet). This gives I hope a suitable level of detail to the ensemble and is modest enough at knee-length, but with the material actually in contact with the body only down to thigh length, quite comfortable to wear in warm conditions and 'squashable' enough to drive in.

Yours,
Miranda.
Logged
Ada Thorold
Zeppelin Captain
*****
United Kingdom United Kingdom



« Reply #14 on: January 17, 2015, 09:39:21 pm »

Just thought I would leave a note to say that I have been following this thread for a while and I like your ideas. Thank you for sharing them.

Now I just have to stop reading the title as 'Miranda's cheesecake Steampunk apparel....

~A~
Logged
Miranda.T
Zeppelin Captain
*****
United Kingdom United Kingdom



« Reply #15 on: January 17, 2015, 09:42:29 pm »

Just thought I would leave a note to say that I have been following this thread for a while and I like your ideas. Thank you for sharing them.

Now I just have to stop reading the title as 'Miranda's cheesecake Steampunk apparel....

~A~
Many thanks! Now, I do like cheesecake; I wonder if one could design a hat in which a slice could be secreted and kept suitably cool...  Roll Eyes

Yours,
Miranda.
Logged
Drew P
Zeppelin Admiral
******
United States United States


« Reply #16 on: January 18, 2015, 03:10:41 pm »

Cheesecake Steampunk apparel!?! Shocked

Might need a new thread other than the 'pinup' thread for that one, definitely NSFW! Shocked
Logged
Lady Toadflinger
Snr. Officer
****
United States United States



« Reply #17 on: January 18, 2015, 04:42:58 pm »

My Dear Miranda,
I just found this thread, and, if I may say so, you are a woman after my own heart! I love your ideas and end products! Regarding the wearing of crinolines at events, but not in the car during the drive: My friends and I have solved this dilemma in this manner. We wear our upper steampunk outfit garments with a pair of light pants. When we arrive at the event we slide the crinoline  over the pants, slip out of the pants, then slide the overskirts on over the crinoline. This is accomplished in the event parking lot, in the shelter of our cars. We usually see other ladies doing similar maneuvers, and no one shows disapproval. Before the drive home, we just reverse the process. Cheesy
Logged

This isn't the Junior Chamber of Commerce, Brad!
Miranda.T
Zeppelin Captain
*****
United Kingdom United Kingdom



« Reply #18 on: January 18, 2015, 07:39:51 pm »

My Dear Miranda,
I just found this thread, and, if I may say so, you are a woman after my own heart! I love your ideas and end products! Regarding the wearing of crinolines at events, but not in the car during the drive: My friends and I have solved this dilemma in this manner. We wear our upper steampunk outfit garments with a pair of light pants. When we arrive at the event we slide the crinoline  over the pants, slip out of the pants, then slide the overskirts on over the crinoline. This is accomplished in the event parking lot, in the shelter of our cars. We usually see other ladies doing similar maneuvers, and no one shows disapproval. Before the drive home, we just reverse the process. Cheesy

I was thinking of trying something similar, but unfortunately the children are often so 'raring to go' after a journey we adults are usually forced to jump directly out of the car to race after them! There is barely time to snatch up hat, gloves and handbag, and jackets tend don't tend to be fully in place until half-way across the car park...

Yours,
Miranda.
Logged
Otto Von Pifka
Zeppelin Admiral
******
United States United States


goggles? they're here somewhere.....


« Reply #19 on: January 20, 2015, 05:35:18 am »

a female member of our civil war re-enactors group wears biking/running shorts under her bigger dresses. shockingly anachronistic to the eye when she "drops trow" after an event, but they work for her. the only down side is the high waist of the shorts means she has to plan fairly far ahead for a bathroom run.
Logged
Prof. Cecily
Snr. Officer
****
Spain Spain



« Reply #20 on: January 21, 2015, 11:25:12 am »

Good morning, ladies and gentlemen.
Fabulous ideas, Miranda dear.
Simply fabulous!

I remain yours,
Prof. Cecily
Logged
Miranda.T
Zeppelin Captain
*****
United Kingdom United Kingdom



« Reply #21 on: February 17, 2015, 10:12:41 pm »

Good evening Ladies and Gentlemen,
Following the previous missives regarding cooler steampunk attire for the warmer months (yes, we are asssured by the weather presenters that spring is just around the corner, honestly!), I have a further suggestion, at least for those of us in the UK.

The top pictured below, rather inexpertly modeled by myself, is from Primark, currently reduced from £8 to £3, so if you are interested have a look soon as they are on clearance. Colours are black and the red shown; I would have preferred black myself, but the only one in a 'large'* in the shop was the red, which I think will work better with a black corset rather than the purple one in the picture. It is a crop-top, only reaching down to just below the bust, but this is of course a perfect length to then be tucked into a corset. Given that it is mostly lace, I am confident that it should keep the shoulders, chest and upper back suitably cool on even the hottest days, especially if one can find a suitable parasol to match it with...

Yours,
Miranda.



* in this context, 'large' is UK 14 to 16.
Logged
Miranda.T
Zeppelin Captain
*****
United Kingdom United Kingdom



« Reply #22 on: February 22, 2015, 12:53:46 am »

Another UK-centric entry I'm afraid, but if you have access to BBC iPlayer and an interest in sewing you might wish to have a look at this week's 'The Great British Sewing Bee'; it featured the 1950s 'walk-away dress', a pattern so simple it could be cut and sewn between breakfast and lunch. Indeed, at just three pieces it is very straighforward, and with careful choice of materials and some tweaking I think it could be made very steampunk. Commercial patterns are available, but given its simplicity I might have a go at using some of the internet images avaialble to draft up my own; not right now though, as I have some other projects on my 'to-do' list, more on which in future posts.

Yours,
Miranda.
Logged
Drew P
Zeppelin Admiral
******
United States United States


« Reply #23 on: February 22, 2015, 03:40:44 pm »

Been watching that, it's a good show!
Not like the realityTV crap from over here which I refuse to watch. No bickering, no drama, no BS. And the cooking show is great, too!
Logged
Miranda.T
Zeppelin Captain
*****
United Kingdom United Kingdom



« Reply #24 on: February 28, 2015, 02:52:14 pm »

For those interested, this week's epsisode featured corset making. The style was overbust, one-piece (no busk) but did involve steel boning all round, done from cutting to finish in just 4 hours. Also, for any gentlemen that might drip into this thread, the final challenge was a kilt (which of course can compliment a military look well). Admiral Wilhelm, perhaps  Roll Eyes

Yours,
Miranda.
« Last Edit: February 28, 2015, 02:54:31 pm by Miranda.T » Logged
Pages: [1] 2 3 4   Go Up
  Print  
 
Jump to:  

Powered by MySQL Powered by PHP Powered by SMF 1.1.20 | SMF © 2013, Simple Machines Valid XHTML 1.0! Valid CSS!
Page created in 0.247 seconds with 16 queries.