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Author Topic: {The International Supermarket Junk Food Thread}  (Read 2588 times)
J. Wilhelm
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« Reply #25 on: August 28, 2014, 10:40:48 pm »

We've got BiFi here in the Netherlands and a few neighbouring countries. I think it's called Peperami in the UK.

Saint Nicolaus is coming soon (december 5th) so the supermarkets are selling the saint nic's treats. Kruidnoten, Pepernoten, speculaas, chocolate and marzipan.

Also for the sweettooths: Turkish Delight.

I remember Peperami arrived in Mexico under license in the early/mid 1980s.  In the US there is a long- standing tradition of meat jerky and other snack dried meats, so I ignore if Peperami made it, bit there's a myriad of similar brands that basically sell the same pepperoni-like stick
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« Reply #26 on: August 29, 2014, 11:01:15 am »

Bifi and Capri Sun are the food and drink that reminds me of summer hollidays. We never leave without a package of Bifi's and a cart of Capri Sun.

We've got BiFi here in the Netherlands and a few neighbouring countries. I think it's called Peperami in the UK.

Saint Nicolaus is coming soon (december 5th) so the supermarkets are selling the saint nic's treats. Kruidnoten, Pepernoten, speculaas, chocolate and marzipan.

Also for the sweettooths: Turkish Delight.

I know Pepernoten, people across the UK and the rest of Europe should be able to find the very similar Pfeffernüßen in Aldi and Lidl (along with the Stollen).

I don't know Kruidnoten, though… I'm guessing that they are mostly flavoured with cloves (kruidnagels), as well as ginger and cinnamon, right?

Pepernoten are similar to Pfeffernüßen. Kruidnoten are harder. More like speculoos.


Talking about junk food made me hungry. I'm off to the local greaspit for some fries and frikandel speciaal.  And to wash it down, I'll have a coca cola. (to me, the best cola!)
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J. Wilhelm
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« Reply #27 on: August 30, 2014, 02:22:55 am »

Bifi and Capri Sun are the food and drink that reminds me of summer hollidays. We never leave without a package of Bifi's and a cart of Capri Sun.

We've got BiFi here in the Netherlands and a few neighbouring countries. I think it's called Peperami in the UK.

Saint Nicolaus is coming soon (december 5th) so the supermarkets are selling the saint nic's treats. Kruidnoten, Pepernoten, speculaas, chocolate and marzipan.

Also for the sweettooths: Turkish Delight.


I know Pepernoten, people across the UK and the rest of Europe should be able to find the very similar Pfeffernüßen in Aldi and Lidl (along with the Stollen).

I don't know Kruidnoten, though… I'm guessing that they are mostly flavoured with cloves (kruidnagels), as well as ginger and cinnamon, right?

Pepernoten are similar to Pfeffernüßen. Kruidnoten are harder. More like speculoos.


Talking about junk food made me hungry. I'm off to the local greaspit for some fries and frikandel speciaal.  And to wash it down, I'll have a coca cola. (to me, the best cola!)

Speaking of Frikandel, I'm wondering if we've exhausted the list in the Fried Foods from Around the World Thread...
Yes I like Coca Cola better than Pepsi.  Those are the 2 oldest.  We have many other imitation colas in the US, notably "RC Cola.". And an infinity of brand-free colas available at Supermarkets.  Another original Victorian Era drink, Dr. Pepper, is repeatedly copied and I happen to like my local super's "Dr. B" better, because it reminds me of what Dr. Pepper tasted like in the 1970s.  Unfortunately they also tried to do a " sugar cane" Dr. B variant, which to me "fell flat on it's face," because they forgot that molasses or brown sugar doesn't have the same taste as refined sugar, which is what the original Dr. Pepper used.  The brown sugar messes the taste of the other spices in the soda...
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J. Wilhelm
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« Reply #28 on: October 07, 2017, 05:42:30 pm »

OK. Here's a packaged candy that I can attest as being as close to orgasmic as one could possibly get. It's basically a dried fruit sheet (fruit roll in the US) made from Tamarind pulp and seasoned with salt, sugar, and powdered chile peppers. "Pulparindo," a play on the words "pulp" and "Tamarind" is the name of this fruit roll / tape. There are actually a thousand other copycat brands that will sell rolls of all shapes and paste, but this is the oldest one I can remember and that I can relate to back in my elementary school and junior high school years.


Folks in the UK may have heard of Tamarind "fruit" by way of India and it is an ingredient in Worcestershire sauce. Elsewhere, like the US, it will be Far Eastern cuisines which may have introduced Tamarind to a few advernturous people, but by and large I'd say Tamarind is unknown in the US. Originally from Africa, it is one of those foods carried by the Spanish and the Portuguese explorers to Asia and the Americas back in the 1500s and 1600s, when they were busy splitting the world between themselves.  

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tamarind


For those who don't know, Tamarind is a legume, technically speaking. Not unlike a pea pod or a spring bean, but larger, with a hard brown bark-like skin and with very large burgundy-coloured "beans" which are totally inedible because they are so hard. What you eat from the pod is the reddish brown flesh when the "fruit" had been dried. The flesh of Tamarind has a hard to describe yet pleasant earthy and lemony taste. It is extremely high in Vitamin C and other acids, and it is replete with fibre - more than mango. Eating the pulp will leave a bit of bark-like grit in your tongue, somewhat similar to poorly ground cinnamon.

Using chile pepper for sweets may sound very strange outside of Mexico, but in Mexico it is extremely common to see fruit and hard candy be garnished or even covered with red ground chile pepper. The smoky "earthiness" of the chile pepper combines very well with the Tamarind taste, and the intensity of flavor afforded by the added salt and sugar means that this is one incredibly intense taste. It is sweet, sour, salty and spicy all at the same time, and I don't think I've ever encountered a candy this strong.

Orgasmic. Yes, pardon my analogy ladies and gents, but that is the way I'd describe the taste when you let the fruit roll dissolve slowly in your mouth. It is so intense, you'll have to stop doing whatever else you are doing at the moment, just to let the flavor pass from your mouth to the throat *wipes forehead with handkerchief*
« Last Edit: October 07, 2017, 06:15:08 pm by J. Wilhelm » Logged
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