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Author Topic: welding onto a ring ?  (Read 653 times)
4_0_4
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Hi Forest , hows Fanny?


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« on: July 29, 2014, 04:16:36 pm »

how difficult would it be to weld a banana plug ( 2mm ) onto to a ring like this ?

Would it need to be screwed in ( I assume so ) for stability and therefore more like those sextoys you see - much like this ?

Next question - same question but with a rod - 4- 10 mm / maybe 4 - 6 " in length



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Prof Thadeus Q. Wychlock
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What Watt ?!


« Reply #1 on: July 29, 2014, 04:57:19 pm »

Good heavens sir !!!!

You must give a chap a warning or at least a sly wink before exposure to such ........ er.......erm ........ "things"

*sits down reaching for the brandy*
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Hektor Plasm
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All-Round Oddfellow.


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« Reply #2 on: July 29, 2014, 06:16:08 pm »

Hmm- how big are those rings? I see they are splints for hypermobility, but a quick glance does not indicate for which body parts, or the materials you are interested in- silver?
The technique will depend on these factors; perhaps hard soldering, rather than welding.

I'm sure it can be done. ( Fairly...)

HP
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Drew P
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« Reply #3 on: July 29, 2014, 11:56:20 pm »

Some banana plugs are 2 piece units. Would it be feasible to'sandwhich' the ring between them and then solder?
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von Corax
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« Reply #4 on: July 30, 2014, 01:46:06 am »

Will it need to be worn afterwards? And if so, do I want to know how it'll be worn?

I see that some of them are nickel silver (actually a type of brass containing nickel) which AIUI solders well; it's the preferred rail material among model railroaders because of its silvery colour and because the surface oxide is electrically conductive.
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Keith_Beef
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France France


« Reply #5 on: July 30, 2014, 09:33:00 am »

Will it need to be worn afterwards? And if so, do I want to know how it'll be worn?

I see that some of them are nickel silver (actually a type of brass containing nickel) which AIUI solders well; it's the preferred rail material among model railroaders because of its silvery colour and because the surface oxide is electrically conductive.


Nickel silver? I really doubt that. Recently (like, in the last three years, I think) introduced EU rules say that you can't use nickel-bearing alloys like that in applications where the metal is, or is likely to be, in contact with the skin for prolonged periods; this is to avoid allergic reactions.

Looking at one of the splint descriptions, the two finishes proposed are nickel-free red brass and 925 silver.

Both of these are easy to solder to.
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von Corax
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« Reply #6 on: July 30, 2014, 09:47:46 am »

Will it need to be worn afterwards? And if so, do I want to know how it'll be worn?

I see that some of them are nickel silver (actually a type of brass containing nickel) which AIUI solders well; it's the preferred rail material among model railroaders because of its silvery colour and because the surface oxide is electrically conductive.


Nickel silver? I really doubt that. Recently (like, in the last three years, I think) introduced EU rules say that you can't use nickel-bearing alloys like that in applications where the metal is, or is likely to be, in contact with the skin for prolonged periods; this is to avoid allergic reactions.

Looking at one of the splint descriptions, the two finishes proposed are nickel-free red brass and 925 silver.

Both of these are easy to solder to.


Last I checked, Oklahoma wasn't part of the EU, and the description for this one specifically states, "German silver (contains nickel.)" German silver is another name for nickel silver. Most of the thumb splints are available in nickel silver as well.

That particular niggle aside, it appears that most, if not all, versions of these products are easy to solder, which is really the answer to the question the OP actually asked.
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4_0_4
Snr. Officer
****
Sweden Sweden


Hi Forest , hows Fanny?


WWW
« Reply #7 on: July 30, 2014, 11:44:57 pm »

Good heavens sir !!!!

You must give a chap a warning or at least a sly wink before exposure to such ........ er.......erm ........ "things"

*sits down reaching for the brandy*

Tongue
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4_0_4
Snr. Officer
****
Sweden Sweden


Hi Forest , hows Fanny?


WWW
« Reply #8 on: July 30, 2014, 11:47:09 pm »

Will it need to be worn afterwards? And if so, do I want to know how it'll be worn?

I see that some of them are nickel silver (actually a type of brass containing nickel) which AIUI solders well; it's the preferred rail material among model railroaders because of its silvery colour and because the surface oxide is electrically conductive.

its for my fingers so yes to be worn

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