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Author Topic: Ideas for my new tutoring project!  (Read 821 times)
Abracabella
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« on: July 28, 2014, 09:38:41 am »

I seem to be starting a lot of threads - probably because my questions are rather obscure!

Firstly, I am a private tutor with 30 pupils aged between three and eleven years; secondly, I need a new project to fuel their imaginations!

Last term we did '20th Century Britain' and in September we are doing 'Victorians and Edwardians'. A few of the parents want to me to cover science (I already teach them all maths and English) as a few need help with this subject.

I have loads of ideas about teaching this era (for obvious reasons), but I'd really like to collaborate with more Steampunks to ensure I inject something really special into these lessons. I want to make stuff with the children, see how things work, read about interesting scientists like Tesla and fuel them to WANT TO LEARN! My lessons are not like school and I teach what I think is interesting! Young children don't get anywhere near enough history tuition - I want to change this!

So, do you have any ideas for things I could incorporate into my sessions? Interesting photos would be great, as well as ideas!

Thank you,

Bel  Grin
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IvyGrey
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« Reply #1 on: July 28, 2014, 01:32:29 pm »

Well, I'm very new here, so forgive me if I am speaking out of turn, but it seems to me the obvious ideas for your kiddos would be things like constructing moving vehicles to learn about mechanics and engine (there were things called Erector Sets long ago, not sure if they still exist); also learning the inner workings of clocks, same principle there. There are loads of pics and tutorials all over the web for crafting a hot air balloon out of a defunct lightbulb and some metallic puffy paint…nonfunctional, but artistic and goes along with the lesson on dirigibles. Pinhole cameras are easy to do and extremely cool. Soda can steam engines.

Is this what you are looking for?
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Abracabella
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« Reply #2 on: July 28, 2014, 03:51:54 pm »

Perfect! Thank you... I need inspiration.
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IvyGrey
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« Reply #3 on: July 28, 2014, 03:58:54 pm »

You might spend some time reading about what went on at the World's Fairs of the time period. That may give you further ideas for topics of study.
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walking stick
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« Reply #4 on: July 28, 2014, 05:14:06 pm »

Stephenson's Rocket.  Your dad can help you find the best model kit for class and/or the plans for making the model in brass. The Science Museum have stuff about it.  More than one member of  S.M.E.E. has made a working scale replica.
I remember seeing a Victorian model that ran on a spirit lamp. Plenty of interest there. 

Or History of air travel including comparisons between The Montgolfier Brothers and The Wright Brothers with mini hot air balloons and rubber band propeller planes.
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pakled
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« Reply #5 on: July 28, 2014, 05:31:12 pm »

I remember a wooden submarine (Italian, IIRC) being done in the 19th century. Being that the Holland was done around 1900 (which technically is the last year of the 19th Century), a history of submarines? Just a thought.
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Clym Angus
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« Reply #6 on: July 28, 2014, 08:43:03 pm »

Pressure, pneumatics, sinking boats with bubbles. Bridge building, Newtonian liquids, magnetism, static electricity! The list goes on, I would maybe take a day trip out to a place where they do this kind of stuff. The science museums in London and Bristol have some excellent introductory routes into science for kids.

Also take a look in your local library for science books pitched at children. Its all about extracting the fun. The world around us is very odd and very cool at times...
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Wormster
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« Reply #7 on: July 28, 2014, 08:53:20 pm »

Hydraulics using medical syringes, small bore PTFE tubing and washing up liquid.
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« Reply #8 on: July 28, 2014, 09:04:24 pm »

How To Suck An Egg Into A Bottle


~SeVeN~
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von Corax
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« Reply #9 on: July 29, 2014, 12:21:46 am »

You might look into a Discovery UK series from a few years ago called Industrial Revelations as a source of ideas.

An idea for a simple build: before Newcomen built his atmospheric engine to pump water out of mines, Thomas Savery built the "Miner’s Friend" steam "engine," which had a sealed drum halfway down the shaft with pipes running down to the sump and up to the surface, and a manually-controlled connection to an adjacent boiler. The operator would open the steam valve and steam would drive water out of the drum through a backflow preventer ("check valve") to the surface; when the operator closed the valve, the steam in the drum condensed, allowing atmospheric pressure to drive water up from the sump, through another check valve, to refill the drum. It would be easy to build a model from some vinyl tubing and an airtight container of some sort (2ℓ PET pop bottle, perhaps?) and use a large syringe to mimic the steam, provided you could come up with a check valve. (Perhaps a clear film canister or prescription pill bottle with tubes entering top and bottom, with a hard rubber marble inside, might work.)
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Abracabella
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« Reply #10 on: July 29, 2014, 08:56:25 am »

Thank you so much everyone!

Next week will be 'Science Week' for the children. I've already planned a few experiments, based on your ideas, so thank you very much!

Smiley
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von Corax
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« Reply #11 on: July 29, 2014, 11:58:00 pm »

Thank you so much everyone!

Next week will be 'Science Week' for the children. I've already planned a few experiments, based on your ideas, so thank you very much!

Smiley

We expect a full report. Wink
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Hurricane Annie
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« Reply #12 on: July 30, 2014, 02:27:51 am »

baking soda volcanoes, tie in with  intrepid 19th century explorers, Krakatoa etc
 Butter making
toffee and hokey pokey making
ginger beer making
 mild explosives with  house cleaners

 its all science and  it uses  products handy to the average housewife
 
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Abracabella
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« Reply #13 on: August 02, 2014, 05:08:28 pm »

Thank you so much everyone!

Next week will be 'Science Week' for the children. I've already planned a few experiments, based on your ideas, so thank you very much!

Smiley

We expect a full report. Wink

I am having to make it the week after next as everyone seems to be on holiday! You will be getting a nice full report (with photographs)!

Thank you all!  Wink
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Narsil
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« Reply #14 on: August 04, 2014, 12:11:50 pm »


One think I would say is to try to focus on things which allow for actual experimentation rather than just demonstration and explanation. The most important thing to learn about science is that it is a process not just a body of information.

With this in mind the best apparatus is one that allows you to change variables and make measurements, this also allows discussion of things like experimental error. One approach might be  to start with something very simple, a pendulum would be good and use that a starting point for increasingly sophisticated measurements. Also the physics of a simple pendulum is simple enough that you can do basic calculations from first principals.
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« Reply #15 on: August 07, 2014, 02:33:20 am »

Sterling engine, easily made from DIY bits and works.
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Abracabella
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« Reply #16 on: August 07, 2014, 09:34:38 am »


One think I would say is to try to focus on things which allow for actual experimentation rather than just demonstration and explanation. The most important thing to learn about science is that it is a process not just a body of information.

With this in mind the best apparatus is one that allows you to change variables and make measurements, this also allows discussion of things like experimental error. One approach might be  to start with something very simple, a pendulum would be good and use that a starting point for increasingly sophisticated measurements. Also the physics of a simple pendulum is simple enough that you can do basic calculations from first principals.

Lovely ideas. I think everyone who has commented here should work with children - they need inspirational teachers!
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Wormster
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« Reply #17 on: August 07, 2014, 09:56:27 am »

Lovely ideas. I think everyone who has commented here should work with children - they need inspirational teachers!

Been there, done that, got the tee shirt. I got out of education/yoofwork 6 years ago to change lifestyle and get away from all the infighting and bureaucracy.
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