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Author Topic: How often do you dress Steampunk?  (Read 2466 times)
Abracabella
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« on: July 13, 2014, 09:24:03 am »

I've been desperate to ask this for a week or so, but don't want to start too many new topics in a short time.

I was just wondering, how often do you dress Steampunk - or do you express your Steampunk attitudes some other way? I am really interested in psychology and have recently tutored a couple of students in understanding the phenomemon of conformity; apparently I tick most of the non-conformist boxes!
So, do you guys embrace Steampunk dress and wear it for going out on a Sunday afternoon (to a fete today in my case)? Maybe I am a big attention seeker, but, to be honest, I just feel confident in a dress, waistcoat and boots. Plenty of people wear shorts and tights, or tiny dresses hardly long enough to cover their bottoms - I don't stare at these people and respect their wish to dress as they want!
If you don't dress Steampunk, how else do you satisfy your urge to be unique? I just find dressing-up comes naturally to me as I spend most weekends in costume doing my children's entertaining!

I'm interested in the responses to this - maybe I am crazy? Grin
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« Reply #1 on: July 13, 2014, 10:13:55 am »

As my 'steampunk' clothes are based on a Victorian factory worker, brown corduroy trousers with leather belt, green tweed jacket with a period 'union badge' on the lapel, pocket watch and flat cap I'd say I wear it about 30% of the time.

When I'm attending Steampunk events or having a stall at a street fair selling my Steampunk creations I add a few tasteful bits such as a 'spanner in the works' medal or a 'little eccentric' badge. Just enough to make it interesting but I don't want to put people off by making them think they need a complicated costume to be a Steampunk (cunning use of applied psychology to get more sales).

I find that to be both reasonably smart, practical enough for everyday use (try prospecting in a top hat and frock coat or wearing a weaponised mechanical arm and you'll understand) plus it's unlikely to conflict with any 'dress code' if I decide to pop into a pub for a drink and a sit down.

I express my uniqueness partly by not wearing a top hat and goggles, partly in my artistic creations, and partly by going off and having mad adventures and doing things that most people think can't be done.
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SeVeNeVeS
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« Reply #2 on: July 13, 2014, 12:04:33 pm »

I never dress Steampunk, I look pretty much a standard, shaven headed, leather/ denim clad biker and or a mundane most of the time. I love the dress-up thread here though and cant wait for updates of the finery people post.

My passion is punking up my house, buying/ making trinkets, taxidermy, all things brass and copper and anything that just "fits" my idea of Steampunk Aesthetics.

I work a sh!tty job, my home and motorbikes are my sanctuary from normality, my escape.

That is how I define individual.

~SeVeN~



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Abracabella
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« Reply #3 on: July 13, 2014, 12:27:55 pm »

I never dress Steampunk, I look pretty much a standard, shaven headed, leather/ denim clad biker and or a mundane most of the time. I love the dress-up thread here though and cant wait for updates of the finery people post.

My passion is punking up my house, buying/ making trinkets, taxidermy, all things brass and copper and anything that just "fits" my idea of Steampunk Aesthetics.

I work a sh!tty job, my home and motorbikes are my sanctuary from normality, my escape.

That is how I define individual.

~SeVeN~


Hello, I'm sad that you hate your job - what exactly do you do?

I love my job, but I didn't relish the cleaning I did whilst I was studying for my OU History degree. Making stuff is an escapism - my Dad also loves motorbikes and sees tinkering as a stress-busting tool.

Steampunk as escapism seems to be a trend. Does anybody do it just because it is fun?
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SeVeNeVeS
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« Reply #4 on: July 13, 2014, 01:52:54 pm »

Hello, I'm sad that you hate your job - what exactly do you do?

I love my job, but I didn't relish the cleaning I did whilst I was studying for my OU History degree. Making stuff is an escapism - my Dad also loves motorbikes and sees tinkering as a stress-busting tool.

Steampunk as escapism seems to be a trend. Does anybody do it just because it is fun?

Does not escapism of any kind = fun?

Umm, as for my job, stuck in the building trade for many years, long, hard 12hr days, and yep, I hate it.

~SeVeN~
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Abracabella
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« Reply #5 on: July 13, 2014, 05:47:43 pm »

Hello, I'm sad that you hate your job - what exactly do you do?

I love my job, but I didn't relish the cleaning I did whilst I was studying for my OU History degree. Making stuff is an escapism - my Dad also loves motorbikes and sees tinkering as a stress-busting tool.

Steampunk as escapism seems to be a trend. Does anybody do it just because it is fun?

Does not escapism of any kind = fun?

Umm, as for my job, stuck in the building trade for many years, long, hard 12hr days, and yep, I hate it.

~SeVeN~

I really respect you for doing a job you hate - thumbs up!

This might make you chuckle https://www.facebook.com/photo.php?v=10152520763370926. Apparently what half-dressed Steampunks do on days off! Smiley
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« Reply #6 on: July 13, 2014, 06:11:39 pm »

And I respect you for still having a job in construction.  Well done!

As to the original subject, we live in the Sunny South in the States; much of the time truly Steampunk clothing would be murderously hot.  When I was working in an office job, though, it was waistcoat and watch chain every day - my great-great-grandfather's watch on that chain.  The wonders of air conditioning  Cheesy

Now, it is possible to do dress more in style about nine months out of the year, and special events - conventions, meetups - will get me dressed up even out of season, despite the heat.  I have realized that I have fallen into a bit of a rut lately, polo shirts with cargo trousers, and I want to force myself out of that.  Fortunately, without an employer, I can set my own dress code.  So, with a nod to the climate, I am working more towards that goal.


Cheers!

Chas.
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« Reply #7 on: July 13, 2014, 08:23:18 pm »

I'm a goth with a long-term passion for steampunky and Victorian aesthetics, current obsessions with lolita and mori girl and the odd bit of 40s-60s vintage thrown in.

I wear something that fits my slightly odd mixture of styles every day and the places I work have pretty relaxed dress codes. Sometimes it's very casual - black jeans/skirt and a jumper with a ghost or bat on it (that's my 'I feel to rubbish to try today clothes') but most of the time I dress pretty elaborately. At least 1 outfit per week is recognisably steampunk I'd say, and the rest are somewhere between corp goth and forest elf, even though I work 7 days a week at the moment =].

My clothes make me happy, so I don't think I could ever dress any other way (except in obvious practical situations like needing a uniform in some workplaces). Besides a lot of my wardrobe is pretty formal and so appropriate even in most professional environments. You know you have a problem when you have to riffle through 5 slightly different black waistcoats before you find the one you wanted to wear today...
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« Reply #8 on: July 13, 2014, 11:42:29 pm »

I only dress full steampunk (corset, hat etc.) at an event but I try to have a little bit in my everyday dress; nice boots, waistcoats, blouses etc. and I always wear a skirt. The styling suits me better than most 21st century trends and I like to feel well dressed. Since London is so diverse and anonymous I don't stick out too much.

~A~
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VampirateMace
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« Reply #9 on: July 14, 2014, 03:19:31 am »

Um, not that often. Full steampunk, maybe only once or twice a year. Casual steampunk, about one to four times a month. Summer's hardest, I'm thinking I need to get a short sleeve button up shirt to go with my khaki shorts to complete the expedition look (it's just finding a button-up shirt that'll accommodate my bust).
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ForestB
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« Reply #10 on: July 14, 2014, 03:27:55 am »

Not as much as I want to. A few times a year for events, sometimes throwing in some elements casually if I'm in the mood, and we are going out somewhere,but I can't at work, we have a very specific dress code...
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« Reply #11 on: July 14, 2014, 02:51:46 pm »

Full steampunk, not often, just for photos.

A bit of steampunk, often. My basic steampunk shirt, a worn collarlessed tea stained button up, is my favorite everyday shirt. My drovers coat is worn whenever the weather permits. My wristcuff is something I wear out whenever I go out for the day.
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« Reply #12 on: July 14, 2014, 03:45:39 pm »

Tricky one, is someone who must dress in Steampunk attire all the time just as trapped as someone who dresses in a cheap suit? Is the point of freedom the right to choose from day to day or the right to be different all the time? Is it both?

I have been giving this some thought and I have decided that the way to go is with the monogram. My persona as the self proclaimed Lord of Misrule and the wider House of Misrule, is starting to grow on me like a nice mossy psychological lichen. I'm starting to honestly think there is some philosophical mileage to the idea.

And why not? Everyone wants to be a superhero after all. It's better to make some form of credible sense and statement (like Dr Steel) than run around in tights with a tazer like an absolute lunatic (Phoenix Jones)  or band wagon jumping for the sake of selling product (Rex Velvet). So yes, like the Green Lanterns cufflinks, the Riddlers tie pin I intend to turn myself into a brand. A clasp here, a badge there, continuity but not necessarily uniformity. Themed accessorization, to exemplify the utilitarian cult of me.

A return to the coat of arms.

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« Reply #13 on: July 14, 2014, 08:03:43 pm »

Whenever there's an excuse, and it doesn't have to be much of one! Many of the cothes in my wardrobe are part of my "steampunk" outfits so I can pass muster without too much effort. I'm going to have to give thought to a summer outfit, we were at an event on Saturday and I wore cravat,waistcoat, frockcoat and top hat and I nearly melted!
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Abracabella
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« Reply #14 on: July 14, 2014, 08:44:23 pm »

I almost cooked yesterday; I was 'steaming' - literally and metaphorically!  Smiley
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Arabella Periscope
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« Reply #15 on: July 15, 2014, 12:13:10 am »

You can always add Steampunk to your dress.  My psychology professor did a great demonstration of the fallacy of unconventional or outrageous dress in one of his lectures.  The students included the usual goths and art students who honestly believed that they were shocking the world with radical gauges and facial tattooing and there was a girl who used to shave her head and wear nothing but a longish t-shirt with oversized combat boots.  But today there were among us a girl wearing a bathing suit and a boy wearing the paper gown given to patients in an emergency room in a hospital, plus a woman wearing conventional bra and half-slip.  Everyone was shocked!  "This," said the professsor, is what it looks like when someone wears really unconventional clothes in public.  You others are just following a convention of rebellion."

So when we add our waistcoats or our vintage lace or our hats we are making a style statement which pleases us.  Why not indeed?  There is plenty of scope for adjustment according to circumstances.

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« Reply #16 on: July 15, 2014, 01:34:15 am »

Whenever there's an excuse, and it doesn't have to be much of one! Many of the cothes in my wardrobe are part of my "steampunk" outfits so I can pass muster without too much effort. I'm going to have to give thought to a summer outfit, we were at an event on Saturday and I wore cravat,waistcoat, frockcoat and top hat and I nearly melted!

Well that seems to be a common dilemma, isn't it?  We always complain how the Victorians tended to over-dress.  Blame it on cultural prudishness or the mini-ice age of the 19th. C., but seems genuine Victorian clothing is too thick for the summer months.

The escape for Americans and other peoples in the rest of the Americas, is the fact that clothing was different and more adapted to the environment.

Steampunk, however is a fantasy world and not a historical reproduction so plenty of room to play is available, though I gather that perhaps we tend to be too restrictive in our definition of the day to day clothing options...
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Clym Angus
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« Reply #17 on: July 16, 2014, 11:49:25 am »

You can always add Steampunk to your dress.  My psychology professor did a great demonstration of the fallacy of unconventional or outrageous dress in one of his lectures.  The students included the usual goths and art students who honestly believed that they were shocking the world with radical gauges and facial tattooing and there was a girl who used to shave her head and wear nothing but a longish t-shirt with oversized combat boots.  But today there were among us a girl wearing a bathing suit and a boy wearing the paper gown given to patients in an emergency room in a hospital, plus a woman wearing conventional bra and half-slip.  Everyone was shocked!  "This," said the professsor, is what it looks like when someone wears really unconventional clothes in public.  You others are just following a convention of rebellion."

So when we add our waistcoats or our vintage lace or our hats we are making a style statement which pleases us.  Why not indeed?  There is plenty of scope for adjustment according to circumstances.

Intriguing, I wear black most of the time because it makes for easy wash cycles, goes with anything and hides oil/rust staining. Also you can never have too many pockets which is why I swear by builders trousers. I have 5 to 6 lots of pretty much the same outfit in my wardrobe, it could be said (as Cornel West put it) "I have a limited sartorial imagination."

Does this count as a uniform? Yes but as an adjective, not a noun.

I would suggest that the underlying convention of pragmatism tends to underpin any notion of rebellion or conformity. Practicality first, art second. This is why you don't see those catwalk abominations walking round Tesco. Your psychology professor sounds intriguing. Pepping up the workings of the mind with practical examples. FUN!


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Hurricane Annie
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« Reply #18 on: July 18, 2014, 02:40:10 am »

I never dress Steampunk, I look pretty much a standard, shaven headed, leather/ denim clad biker and or a mundane most of the time. I love the dress-up thread here though and cant wait for updates of the finery people post.

My passion is punking up my house, buying/ making trinkets, taxidermy, all things brass and copper and anything that just "fits" my idea of Steampunk Aesthetics.

I work a sh!tty job, my home and motorbikes are my sanctuary from normality, my escape.

That is how I define individual.

~SeVeN~






 leather and chrome- that is fairly steampunk

 arguably  the  early motor bike designs  could be  considered and influence to steam and diesel  punk













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Hurricane Annie
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« Reply #19 on: July 18, 2014, 02:43:39 am »

 I often incorporate some  steampunk theme into my sartorial  experience.  Some days it is restricted to hair or accessories and other times  I take on a more full embrace of the ethos.  Non SP friends like to encourage me to dress up  for more adventurous outings.  They like to live   the steampunk life vicariously
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Abracabella
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« Reply #20 on: July 18, 2014, 09:39:01 am »

I often incorporate some  steampunk theme into my sartorial  experience.  Some days it is restricted to hair or accessories and other times  I take on a more full embrace of the ethos.  Non SP friends like to encourage me to dress up  for more adventurous outings.  They like to live   the steampunk life vicariously

I love! Smiley
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Sludge Van Diesel
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« Reply #21 on: July 18, 2014, 09:58:35 am »

I tend to wear collarless cotton or linen shirts with waistcoats & watch & chain on a more or less daily basis.  I'll also include my bowlers or topper & frock coats for appropriate events (like the other week when I went to Black Sabbath on the Friday & a local free festival on Saturday & Sunday).  Otherwise when going out, it's tweed or suit jackets & bare head.


For Steampunk events, I tend to look like this


or this



Although I do tend to wear jeans & t shirts when slobbing around the house, gardening or doing something messy

So 80 - 90% of the time I suppose to some degree
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« Reply #22 on: July 19, 2014, 07:33:50 am »

Most of the time days I wear suspenders (braces), with either a rather floppity worn old gray wide-brimmed fedora/a medium-size black basque-style beret worn like a flat cap (sort of)/an actual flat cap. Sometimes I wear a vest over the suspenders, but this being midsummer in Houston, and a rather wet one at that, it's usually too humid for that to be comfortable, so I just wear the usual longsleeved medium-weight broadcloth shirt with buttondown collar (helps keep the mosquitoes at bay), with dress jeans/slacks and moccasin-style shoes (the inexpensive mailorder-from-Haband type, not terribly steamy, but durable and comfortable as all heck). with as I said suspenders of some kind, usually either button or belt anchored. I tend to look like like a typical (if a bit overweight) person from those old photos that you see of people posed in front of their farmhouses back around the early days of the 20th century. The eyepatch I occasionally get caught wearing makes me look like a post-WWI convalescent, I've been told.

Sometimes I wear a machete or a tomahawk (trade axe type) when I'm outside pruning things or doing other yardwork.

Not over-the-top steamy, but I'd probably blend in if I just wore my regular duds to a con.
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Abracabella
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« Reply #23 on: July 19, 2014, 09:16:55 am »

I think you are all awesome. My friends think I am crazy, but they also don't want me to change. I tend to dress in shorts and t-shirts this time of the year (here I am sitting in my green shorts and red polo ready to go out face-painting and balloon modelling), although I like to dress partly Steampunk when I go to events. It is our local river festival tomorrow so I am probably going to go for the Victorian/Edwardian regatta type outfit. It is really too hot for hats at the moment, but I might have to do something with ribbons. I just like being a little big different, really!
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Hurricane Annie
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« Reply #24 on: July 20, 2014, 02:48:06 am »

 I am partial to the word REGATTA  - it is evocative  has a ring to it. 

 JUBILEE, FLOTILLA,   RENDEZVOUS, AVANT GARDE, SERENDIPITY & LIBERTY are others redolent  with  having a DAMN GOOD TIME

  and the VICTORY ROLL has so many permutation
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