The Steampunk Forum at Brass Goggles
October 23, 2017, 05:28:50 am *
Welcome, Guest. Please login or register.
Did you miss your activation email?

Login with username, password and session length
News: Support BrassGoggles! Donate once or $3/mo.
 See details here.
 
   Home   Blog Help Rules Login Register  
Pages: [1]   Go Down
  Print  
Author Topic: We could have all been living in a Steampunk world by now...  (Read 840 times)
19th Century Space Pilot
Snr. Officer
****
United Kingdom United Kingdom

Cererean
WWW
« on: May 13, 2014, 01:47:58 pm »

...but - thankfully - the CME missed us.

The most striking thing about the story is, I don't remember hearing anything in the news about it when it happened. Civilisation almost gets destroyed, and people... carry on as normal. Perhaps stories where supervillains destroy large parts of the city every week and people carry on like nothing extraordinary has happened, then, are actually realistic (from a social standpoint).
Logged

Now for some shameless self promotion... http://needsmoremarshmallows.blogspot.co.uk/

 - Aetheric Aviatrix
Jeory Gray
Deck Hand
*
United States United States



« Reply #1 on: May 13, 2014, 03:14:03 pm »

You make a very good point. To quote a famous picture-show called "Transformers" there was a gentleman who said something like "Years from now our children will ask us. Where were you when they took over? And we'll say, 'We just stood by and watched.'"

On a different note though, how awesome would it be if steam were to become the new source of power? Steam is clean and renewable and let's face it, we would all be overjoyed at the chance to make our gadget and invention ideas reality.
Logged
CorneliaCarton
Zeppelin Captain
*****
Scotland Scotland

Gravatar


« Reply #2 on: May 13, 2014, 03:30:27 pm »

They didn't tell us because people have a habit of panicking when the end is nigh.
Logged

Ginny Audriana Irondust Moravia. Pleased t' meet ya.
Jeory Gray
Deck Hand
*
United States United States



« Reply #3 on: May 13, 2014, 03:41:23 pm »

^This is a fact. Have any of you heard about the man who emerged from his underground bunker after 14 years of hiding because of the Y2K scare? It makes you wonder how many other people are still hiding in underground bunkers from that and other scares.
Logged
Siliconous Skumins
Server Monk
Governor
Rogue Ætherlord
****
United Kingdom United Kingdom



« Reply #4 on: May 13, 2014, 07:57:18 pm »

On a different note though, how awesome would it be if steam were to become the new source of power? Steam is clean and renewable and let's face it, we would all be overjoyed at the chance to make our gadget and invention ideas reality.


Steam still is the source of 90% of all our power - everything except solar PV, wind and hydro uses steam to drive a turbine generator. Wink


Have any of you heard about the man who emerged from his underground bunker after 14 years of hiding because of the Y2K scare? It makes you wonder how many other people are still hiding in underground bunkers from that and other scares.


That one is actually a fake - or rather a bit of satire from a Canadian radio show, I should say.  Wink

However I do know of several stories of individuals, or even whole families, doing similar things. Even here in the UK there was a few high profile cases.
One that springs to mind is that of  Jeremy and Angela Perron and their two children; They feared Y2K could bring food shortages, the accidental discharge of nuclear weapons, the breakdown of global capitalism and rioting on the streets. So in April 1998, Mrs Perron, a publisher, and her husband, a computer programmer, closed their business and quit their jobs, sold their house,withdrew all their money in the bank, sold one of their cars (the modern one with a "computer chip"...), hired a lorry and drove more than 500 miles from Wiltshire in England, to Forres in Scotand. They bought a hillside cottage with no running water or mains electricity (water available from a nearby stream), and began preparing for the millennium. Sacks of rice and tinned & dried food, stockpiled medicines, water purification tablets, generator, vegetables growing in the garden and hens willingly providing eggs, they felt safe with the knowledge that they had enough food to last a year should things get bad.

And then it came........


NOTHING!...  Cheesy


So they decided to stick around and wait for it to happen. Two years later they began to suspect they were wrong, and everyone who laughed at them due to the huge media attention they drew, was perhaps correct afterall. They divorced shortly after... 


Link : http://news.bbc.co.uk/1/hi/scotland/589392.stm   Tuesday, 4 January, 2000.
Logged

[Server Prayer]
Spoiler (click to show/hide)
George Salt
Zeppelin Captain
*****
United Kingdom United Kingdom



« Reply #5 on: May 13, 2014, 09:03:36 pm »

On a different note though, how awesome would it be if steam were to become the new source of power? Steam is clean and renewable and let's face it, we would all be overjoyed at the chance to make our gadget and invention ideas reality.

It's how you generate the steam that causes the problems.. steam being a secondary power source (the primary is  heating the water).
Logged
J. Wilhelm
╬ Admiral und Luftschiffengel ╬
Board Moderator
Immortal
**
United States United States


Sentisne fortunatum punkus? Veni. Diem meum comple


WWW
« Reply #6 on: May 13, 2014, 09:24:50 pm »

On a different note though, how awesome would it be if steam were to become the new source of power? Steam is clean and renewable and let's face it, we would all be overjoyed at the chance to make our gadget and invention ideas reality.

It's how you generate the steam that causes the problems.. steam being a secondary power source (the primary is  heating the water).

Steam is just an energy transport medium, like electricity.   It's properties allow you to extract and convert the energy stored within to any other form you want, typically mechanical energy.  But burning coal or gas, and even using the heat from a nuclear reaction are definitely non-renewable, AND rather dirty (carbon footprint, and nuclear waste).  The only clean use of steam is hydrothermal using Earth's inner heat (derived from the rotating molten inner core, and basically a remnant of energy left over from the formation of the planets).
Logged

Jeory Gray
Deck Hand
*
United States United States



« Reply #7 on: May 13, 2014, 09:42:30 pm »

Thank you for correcting me on that bunker story. Always good to know fact from fiction when it comes to things like that.

On a somewhat related note, does anybody have any good knowledge on the alleged "Greek Steam Cannon?" The show Mythbusters did a special on it a few years ago but I'm one who prefers more solid evidence from more reliable sources than a television show. It's a very interesting idea and it is not an impossible tool for an ancient civilization like the Greeks to have built. I'm not saying that it did exist. Just that it could have.
Logged
HideTheNines
Deck Hand
*
United States United States



« Reply #8 on: May 14, 2014, 02:35:29 am »

You make a very good point. To quote a famous picture-show called "Transformers" there was a gentleman who said something like "Years from now our children will ask us. Where were you when they took over? And we'll say, 'We just stood by and watched.'"

On a different note though, how awesome would it be if steam were to become the new source of power? Steam is clean and renewable and let's face it, we would all be overjoyed at the chance to make our gadget and invention ideas reality.

Most people don't realize that nuclear power plants actually run steam generators.
Logged
Rory B Esq BSc
Snr. Officer
****
United Kingdom United Kingdom


« Reply #9 on: May 15, 2014, 09:24:39 pm »

Solar steam, using parabolic mirrors to focus on a boiler is quite 'clean' as sources of energy go. It might be best suited to low power applications of less than 5 HP or so except in countries / areas with lots of sun
Logged
akumabito
Immortal
**
Netherlands Netherlands


Mundus Patria Nostra!


WWW
« Reply #10 on: May 15, 2014, 09:49:48 pm »

Solar steam, using parabolic mirrors to focus on a boiler is quite 'clean' as sources of energy go. It might be best suited to low power applications of less than 5 HP or so except in countries / areas with lots of sun

Concentrated solar power (CSP) with molten salt as heat storage / temperature buffer. That's where it's at.. Smiley
Logged

von Corax
Squire of the Lambda Calculus
Board Moderator
Immortal
**
Canada Canada

Prof. Darwin Prætorius von Corax


« Reply #11 on: May 18, 2014, 02:13:42 am »

On a different note though, how awesome would it be if steam were to become the new source of power? Steam is clean and renewable and let's face it, we would all be overjoyed at the chance to make our gadget and invention ideas reality.

It's how you generate the steam that causes the problems.. steam being a secondary power source (the primary is  heating the water).

Steam is just an energy transport medium, like electricity.   It's properties allow you to extract and convert the energy stored within to any other form you want, typically mechanical energy.  But burning coal or gas, and even using the heat from a nuclear reaction are definitely non-renewable, AND rather dirty (carbon footprint, and nuclear waste).  The only clean use of steam is hydrothermal using Earth's inner heat (derived from the rotating molten inner core, and basically a remnant of energy left over from the formation of the planets).

A goodly percentage of geothermal heat is generated by radioisotopic decay of elements like thorium and potassium.

As for solar power, I vaguely recall reading (and seeing a contemporary illustration) of a Victorian-era (give or take) French printing shop powering their presses from a large Stirling engine mounted on the roof.
Logged

By the power of caffeine do I set my mind in motion
By the Beans of Life do my thoughts acquire speed
My hands acquire a shaking
The shaking becomes a warning
By the power of caffeine do I set my mind in motion
The Leverkusen Institute of Paleocybernetics is 5838 km from Reading
Hurricane Annie
Zeppelin Captain
*****
New Zealand New Zealand



« Reply #12 on: May 20, 2014, 03:48:07 am »

womens workloads do not change much  from varied circumstances that can befall society.

 We still have to supervise children and feed them.
Logged
19th Century Space Pilot
Snr. Officer
****
United Kingdom United Kingdom

Cererean
WWW
« Reply #13 on: May 24, 2014, 12:06:57 am »

Actually, they do. Before the Industrial Revolution, women in England had to get jobs, because wages weren't high enough for a sole breadwinner for the family, and they weren't able to rely on the resources of the extended family (David Willetts, The Pinch). Conversely, after the development of labour saving machinery in the home, their workload there was reduced, and with the rising cost of living, they had to go out and get jobs again...
Logged
Pages: [1]   Go Up
  Print  
 
Jump to:  

Powered by MySQL Powered by PHP Powered by SMF 1.1.20 | SMF © 2013, Simple Machines Valid XHTML 1.0! Valid CSS!
Page created in 0.531 seconds with 16 queries.