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Author Topic: Masking off leather for airbrushing - help needed  (Read 4068 times)
grimnir
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Maker of fine Leathercrafts


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« on: April 19, 2014, 12:33:45 pm »

Hey all, had a little issue today while experimenting with the airbrush. Well, 2 issues really. The big one though was at the end. I masked off the area I wanted to finish with masking tape, pressed the edges down firmly to get a good seal, but after spraying the finish on and taking the tape off I found quite a few areas of leakage, as you can see in the picture. So the first question is, what do you use for masking off? I was using regular white masking tape, is there something better I can use that won't leave behind any residue to prevent later dyework?
 
Second point, as I'm sure you can see, is that I'm getting a fair bit of leakage under the stencil. This one was a metal stencil and looked to be good and flat against the leather but even so there's leaks and spots where there shouldn't be. I am sure some of this is due to my really cheap single action airbrush but even so, I'm getting this a lot. What pressure do you guys run your airbrushes at? I bought a regulator to control mine as the compressor didn't have a very good one and (from what I recall, I have to convert the reading to psi to understand my gauge) I run it at around 15-20 psi. The airbrush is a suction model I use for all dye applications these days - no more uneven finishes! - but stencils I'm having problems with. Do you use anything like a spray mount on them to keep them in place, or just hold them there? Any other tips for a newbie airbrusher?
 
Many thanks Smiley
Raven
 
ps: The dyes and finish I'm using come from here - http://www.leatherfinishingproducts.com.au/index.php/cobblestone/ - Cobblestone dyes. Fantastic product, much easier to use than the Eco-flo and dilute with spirits or water.
« Last Edit: April 19, 2014, 12:56:13 pm by grimnir » Logged

Kindest regards, Raven

Gerard Oswald III
Deck Hand
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Scotland Scotland


« Reply #1 on: April 19, 2014, 12:41:53 pm »

As far as masking stuff off I tend to use a masking latex. PVA glue even works. Just paint it on and it fills all the wee textures in the leather, wait til it dries, and then paint, then you can peel it off. You could maybe incorporate that?
I usually use this method while spray painting material, it works pretty well Smiley
Good luck!
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grimnir
Zeppelin Captain
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Australia Australia


Maker of fine Leathercrafts


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« Reply #2 on: April 19, 2014, 12:55:01 pm »

Well shucks. I forgot to put the photo in Tongue



PVA might work on chrometan but on vegtan - tooling leather -  it soaks right in, you can't peel it off. What I want is something I can put on that I can get off cleanly from a porous surface so I can dye the rest. The pic should make it clearer Smiley
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Gerard Oswald III
Deck Hand
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Scotland Scotland


« Reply #3 on: April 19, 2014, 12:59:24 pm »

Ah right I get ya, hum I'll have a thunk man, unless you could make a stencil out of Friskit (a sorta adhesive acetate film) But then that requires making yet more stencils.
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Mr. Boltneck
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United States United States


« Reply #4 on: April 20, 2014, 03:53:48 am »

Can the airbrush you're using regulate the fluid flow? I'm more used to double-action, where you can alter air and paint at the same time, but the main thing is that bleeding under stencils can mean that you are applying the medium too wet. If you can run less medium per volume of air, it may help.
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grimnir
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« Reply #5 on: April 20, 2014, 08:36:52 am »

It can, to a degree, by screwing in the nozzle, but below a certain level you basically get nothing. I'd originally got it for large area spraying (and because it was cheap Tongue ) and I'm planning on getting a double action when funds are available.
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Ohm Voltage
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« Reply #6 on: June 03, 2014, 12:20:12 am »

I just found this thread and I am also a Leatherworker. I would suggest using rubber cement as a resist. You can paint it on with a brush and let it dry completely. Then, do your airbrushing. When everything is finished and dry again, simply rub off the rubber cement and paint residue. It is important NOT to use the rubber cement on the flashy side of the leather and use it only on the grain (smooth) side of the leather. I would also recommend completing your final finishing of the leather you are painting the rubber cement over. That way it will rub off much easier. Hope this works—try it on a scrap piece first! Good luck!
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Credo quia absurdum est (I believe it because it is absurd).
MWBailey
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"This is the sort of thing no-one ever believes"

rtafStElmo
« Reply #7 on: June 04, 2014, 04:29:06 am »

frisket in my experience tends to react to the oils in the leather (or dusts and resins in wood and other materials) and let go, creating much the same issue with leakage. I've had better luck with just using watercolor paper (the kind that comes in blocks), and overspraying from the paper onto the leather from the sides with a controlled, gentle airflow, or if using a can, just short bursts from a slightly greater than recommended distance, applying sparingly (you wold of course anchor the paper at the edge and/or corners of the sheet(s), either with weights of maybe masking or duct tape (DON'T duct tape the leather!).

The coloration tends to be kind of mottled, but oddly enough, there's less (often no) leakage, apparently because the pressure of the flow is low and directed past and over the edge, instead of onto it or at it, which is what happens when applying the media to the ground straight on from overhead. YMMV, however. As suggested above, try it on a scrap first.
« Last Edit: June 04, 2014, 04:34:08 am by MWBailey » Logged

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grimnir
Zeppelin Captain
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Australia Australia


Maker of fine Leathercrafts


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« Reply #8 on: June 04, 2014, 01:52:47 pm »

I was persuaded to try liquid latex and it does actually come off veg without a problem, so it should serve me ok. I honestly didn't expect it to work but hey, you live and learn Smiley
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Narsil
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United Kingdom United Kingdom



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« Reply #9 on: August 01, 2014, 07:07:53 pm »

You can also get various masking fluids for watercolour painting, some are latex based too. I'm not sure if they would actually be any better for this but might be worth a try
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