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Author Topic: Non-Western Weapons  (Read 3125 times)
Steampunk Away
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« Reply #75 on: January 10, 2014, 07:17:25 pm »

So put clamps on both sides and hammer the spine?

Or the edge because the blade I want to make is a yataghan. This is a kopis type blade so it curves to the inside slightly,
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Astalo
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« Reply #76 on: January 10, 2014, 07:58:44 pm »

It's quite dangerous to straighten leafsprings without real forging heat like in that warsword-article. Old leafsprings have some times hidden flaws causing them to crack under stress. Even brand-new spring steel can suddenly crack while being cold-straightened and send some "splinters" in your face.
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Keith_Beef
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« Reply #77 on: January 11, 2014, 11:46:02 am »

So put clamps on both sides and hammer the spine?

Or the edge because the blade I want to make is a yataghan. This is a kopis type blade so it curves to the inside slightly,

No clamps needed. It's perhaps easier to put a recurve (forward curve) into a kopis, yatagan or khukuri before forging down the bevels to form the edge.

You hold the tang in tongs, heat up the blade and put the tip, with what will become the blade edge facing up, on the anvil. Now hammer against the blade and you'll get a recurve.

Alternatively, if you have a proper bick anvil you can hold the tang as before, put the edge facing down on the bick and hammer against the spine.

You need to put in a bit more curve than you want in the finished blade, because forging the bevels will tend to straighten the blade slightly.

As I mentioned before, look on YouTube for videos. It's much easier to understand if you can see it happening.
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Keith
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« Reply #78 on: January 11, 2014, 02:24:14 pm »

Thank you!
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Steampunk Away
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« Reply #79 on: January 13, 2014, 11:11:08 pm »

What about guns, like the Jezail? Or the Teppi
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Narsil
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« Reply #80 on: January 14, 2014, 12:21:00 am »

In terms of blade making, recycled steel can often be a bit of a false economy, given that a decent sword or knife can take dozens, if not hundreds of hours to make and the steel to make it will probably cost no more than a few pounds/dollars.

The other thing is that, in order to successfully make blades you need to 'learn' the heat treatment process for a particular steel. This learning process is far far easier if you are working with a consistent material rather than a random pile of scrap with unknown and varying properties.

Blade making is one of those things where, if you put in the effort you can get very good results with extremely simple tools and inexpensive materials. Although, as with many things the simpler your set-up the more hours you need to put in. It's also something where the learning curve can be fairly steep and a substantial amount of research is recommended before you start.

Making swords is a slightly different matter as they require some quite advanced techniques to get right. Good looking prop swords can be made, with care and patience,  from mild steel or aluminium but a live sword requires getting a lot of tricky techniques and design elements right.

This isn't intended to put you off, in fact I would recommend blade making as a very rewarding activity to get into but it's important to realise that there is a lot to it and not have unrealistic expectations. But having said that if you do your homework you can achieve a lot with relatively little expense.

The following link is a tutorial for a simple bushcraft knife build http://www.britishblades.com/forums/showthread.php?8673-Full-tang-tutorial
« Last Edit: January 14, 2014, 12:28:13 am by Narsil » Logged







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Steampunk Away
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« Reply #81 on: January 14, 2014, 12:35:21 am »

Trust me, I have done a LOT of homework haha. Just I do not have a proper forge near me, making heat treating harder. I'm trying to make the simple propane tank one stated above, but space is still an issue as I only have a small flat area to work with. I am currently working on acquiring some steel, as the sources I have are soon to run out after a few more projects. I will probably be able to make 2 more decent sized swords and 2-4 knives before having to get more material. I'm open to making people swords/knives if they want.
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Voltin
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« Reply #82 on: January 23, 2014, 10:32:35 pm »

I like the Japanese War Fan.  I may make another. I have also considered a chain whip.
The thuggee had some sort of weaponized scarf.  A killer cravat? Hmmm.

My cousin wanted to incorporate a Japanese War Fan into his Steampunk Pirate outfit and may still do so. He was thinking of adding to it a bit. Like making it mirrored and adding some type of light or something.
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Steampunk Away
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« Reply #83 on: January 23, 2014, 10:40:53 pm »

That would be interesting to see!
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Argus Fairbrass
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« Reply #84 on: January 24, 2014, 06:30:47 pm »

I'm afraid because my internet is currently running on fumes I'm unable to post pictures. I don't know what it's like with the Steampunk movement generally, but I agree we do have a penchant for firearms on this forum. Many of those are of course western in origin, but a few Eastern/Asian designs certainly do turn up from time to time, particularly Jezails.

I do concur though that non western weapons do often present extremely steamy potential. Even speaking in Western terms for a moment, the concept of a world traveller returned with mystical knowledge and exotic weaponry (Steampunk Blowpipe anyone?) has often been a popular plot device. It certainly was with many C19th tales and remains so to this day.

I'm still constantly surprised by the extraordinary and often innovative designs I stumble across. There are a couple on this list for example that are new to me.

http://listverse.com/2011/12/10/top-10-unusual-ancient-weapons/

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Have her steamed and brought to my tent!
Steampunk Away
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United States United States


Long Live The Icarus!

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« Reply #85 on: January 24, 2014, 06:43:14 pm »

Hahahahaha the funny part is that I know all the weapons on that list and love them. The Maori are one of my favorite tribes, and the Aztec obsidian is fantastic to watch during weaponry tests. Also, the Kpinga is truly terrifying to watch in action, but I believe it has steamy potential. They all do really.
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Argus Fairbrass
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So English even the English don't get it!


« Reply #86 on: January 24, 2014, 06:56:38 pm »

I've been aware of the Sikh Chakram and obviously the Katar since I was a boy, but do y'know what? I never knew the Katar split into three blades as I've only ever seen pics and never actually held one. How awesome is that! it's cool rating just went up 100% in my book, and it was pretty damn cool before.  Cheesy
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Steampunk Away
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United States United States


Long Live The Icarus!

https://twitter.com/Steam
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« Reply #87 on: January 24, 2014, 07:04:48 pm »

Oh yea the splitting is awesome, they show a test with the splitting blade on Deadliest Warrior, quite impressive, and several people outfitted Katars with pairs of flintlock pistols for extra carnage.
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