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Author Topic: Non-Western Weapons  (Read 3130 times)
akumabito
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« Reply #25 on: January 05, 2014, 08:57:09 pm »

Hmmm.. come to think of it, I actually have two cheapy tourist-grade sabres laying around. Made in India, ironically. Maybe I should try converting one into a tulwar. Anyone know how you'd go about  adding some extra curvature to the blade?
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« Reply #26 on: January 05, 2014, 09:01:44 pm »

Heat and bend? Not my forte sorry.
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« Reply #27 on: January 06, 2014, 01:03:51 am »

I like the Japanese War Fan.  I may make another. I have also considered a chain whip.
The thuggee had some sort of weaponized scarf.  A killer cravat? Hmmm.

I'm trying to make a War Fan for my buisness partner. And the chain whip is interesting, but a similar thing is a larger chain hook, like a Kama with a Chain.

The problem with the scarf would be a sheathe, if you manage to make one please share with me!
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von Corax
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« Reply #28 on: January 06, 2014, 01:28:47 am »

I believe the scarf was merely weighted on one end; it could thus be used as a cosh, a whip or a one-handed garrotte.
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« Reply #29 on: January 06, 2014, 01:37:44 am »

So would it just be a giant swinging club?

Also, to get away from the East, the African Azande Kpinga throwing knife is delightfully odd, and the New Zealand Maori weapons are very nice.
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von Corax
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« Reply #30 on: January 06, 2014, 02:01:37 am »

Actually it would be more like a one-ended bola. As for the garrotte mode, you swing it at your target's neck, the weight wraps the end around the neck, and then you can jerk the end you're holding to strangle him, crush his trachea, or possibly snap his spine.
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« Reply #31 on: January 06, 2014, 02:10:49 am »

But wasn't the bola known for being inaccurate, I imagine that if you add length and only do one side with would only marginally help that issue.
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von Corax
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« Reply #32 on: January 06, 2014, 06:13:46 am »

Nonono, you don't throw a rumāl, you swing it, and if you can't hit your target with it you should seriously consider joining a different cult.

(I wasn't aware that the bolas had a reputation for inaccuracy; my impression was that they were a hunting weapon of choice in parts of South America.)
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« Reply #33 on: January 06, 2014, 07:11:29 am »

A bola doesn't need to be all that accurate, it handier for bringing down game by entangling the legs and tripping. it's designed to spin through the air so that when one or more of the weighted cords hits something, it wraps around it, also causing the other weighted cords to continue around the target, entangling more limbs.

sort of a cross between a frizbee and a weed whacker.


as for a combat scarf, imagine a fine silk tube with a heavy cord inside, with a weight at either end. the far end of the tube is sewn around the far weighted end of the cord and the near end is camouflaged to match the near end. for combat, you grab the near weight and slide the cloth tube down and past the far weight and swing the two weights and the cord by holding onto the cloth tube. it can entangle, or it can pummel, or both. it could probably be swung and thrown to act like a bola too.
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« Reply #34 on: January 06, 2014, 01:40:01 pm »

Oh ok! Thanks for clearing that up!

So is anyone familiar with the New Zealand Maori?
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« Reply #35 on: January 06, 2014, 02:34:36 pm »

A few starter thoughts on possible interpretations of a killer cravat. 
1) A decorative pin is in fact a short bladed knife in a thin leather sheath carefully obscured by the permanently sewn folds of the cravat.
2) There a braided cord of wire and leather sewn into the cravat and is a thin sheet of lead in the bottom of one end.  Take off the cravat and crush the end with the lead sheet into a solid weight.  You now have a fairly usable strangling cord, the weighted end will help you swing the cord quickly around your victims throat.
3) The cravat is designed in two layers to conceal a pocket with small doses of various poisons ready for use.
4) part of the fabric of the cravat itself is soaked in a poison.  There is only one way of wearing it so that the poisoned areas  do not contact bare flesh. Anyone who doesn't know this perfect style will earn the death penalty for misappropriation of neck wear.
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« Reply #36 on: January 06, 2014, 02:54:54 pm »

A few starter thoughts on possible interpretations of a killer cravat.  
1) A decorative pin is in fact a short bladed knife in a thin leather sheath carefully obscured by the permanently sewn folds of the cravat.
2) There a braided cord of wire and leather sewn into the cravat and is a thin sheet of lead in the bottom of one end.  Take off the cravat and crush the end with the lead sheet into a solid weight.  You now have a fairly usable strangling cord, the weighted end will help you swing the cord quickly around your victims throat.
3) The cravat is designed in two layers to conceal a pocket with small doses of various poisons ready for use.
4) part of the fabric of the cravat itself is soaked in a poison.  There is only one way of wearing it so that the poisoned areas  do not contact bare flesh. Anyone who doesn't know this perfect style will earn the death penalty for misappropriation of neck wear.

I think this should be included in Assassins Creed now haha! So many different ways to hide weapons, all unique. Do you think it would be possible to have all these variations in one scarf? Or would that weigh it down to much?
« Last Edit: January 07, 2014, 01:52:00 pm by Steampunk Away » Logged
walking stick
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« Reply #37 on: January 06, 2014, 07:39:06 pm »

Add the poison packets to the knife sheath. Make it impossible for the knife to cut the packets by accident which would need say a chain mail layer which would add to the weight of the sheath. You could have the sheath fit into a pocket on the end of the cravat instead of the piece of lead, the braided cord could be included in the cravat itself Knife in one hand, cravat cosh in the other you could fight fairly well but you couldn't then have a poisoned section of the fabric, too much chance of it hitting your skin.  Even carrying antidotes that would be too chancy. Poison isn't a well timed weapon.

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Steampunk Away
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« Reply #38 on: January 06, 2014, 07:46:35 pm »

Poison the blade itself? Keep the poison on you and use a type like the Zulu Spit of Poison?
Or make the blade inherently poisonous, like the Maori stingray barb spear? Possibly multiple scarves? Something to hold the poison at the end of the scarf and make the end permeable so that it seeps through and hit the victim?
« Last Edit: January 06, 2014, 09:46:50 pm by Steampunk Away » Logged
Keith_Beef
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« Reply #39 on: January 06, 2014, 11:47:49 pm »

I think that any of the numerous weapons of the North-West frontier, Khyber Pass, Afghan campaigns would be appropriate for Steampunk. Ornately decorated muskets, Khukris, Lances (as used by the Bengal Lancers, for example), and all these are either readily available to buy, or can be made quite easily. Add a pith helmet, boots and gaiters, jodhpurs and a tunic jacket and the costume is done.

I think my Khukri cost me less than €60 for a good, useful and functional piece with a decent wood and leather sheath, something I've used for serious work around the garden and forest.
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« Reply #40 on: January 07, 2014, 12:03:25 am »

I'm thinking of making my own weapons instead, as if I use sheet metal, welding tools, and Beverly cutter, I can make my equipment cheaper, although with a lot of personal work.

Right now I'm making a Kard knife and a Sri Lankan Piha Kaetta, I just need a welding tool to join the layers I have.

Does anyone own any unique weapons and if so, would you mind posting a picture for us to see? I'm quite interested in the many styles a single type of weapon can come in.
« Last Edit: January 07, 2014, 05:10:20 am by Steampunk Away » Logged
Keith_Beef
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« Reply #41 on: January 07, 2014, 03:00:23 pm »

These are not exactly unique, but are the few "non-western" pieces in my small collection. I don't really collect weapons, though; the Khukri is a decent practical camping and gardening tool, the Kriss is a souvenir from a trip to Indonesia and the Chinese sword (possibly a Jian) is an heirloom from a family member who spent some time in the colonial administration in French Indo-China.












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Steampunk Away
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« Reply #42 on: January 07, 2014, 03:05:37 pm »

I love the Kris! It's so unique!

Do you know what metal they are? Like if they are Carbon Steel, a stronger Iron, or just a stronger Stainless Steel or Aluminium?

And also, do they have a maker's mark?
« Last Edit: January 07, 2014, 03:16:17 pm by Steampunk Away » Logged
Keith_Beef
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« Reply #43 on: January 07, 2014, 03:53:07 pm »

I love the Kris! It's so unique!

Do you know what metal they are? Like if they are Carbon Steel, a stronger Iron, or just a stronger Stainless Steel or Aluminium?

And also, do they have a maker's mark?


A true, traditionally made Kriss would be made from meteoric iron. This one is probably made from recycled car or truck leaf springs, though it really could be anything at all. I have absolutely no idea how much I paid for it, but it was in a market with two or three kriss traders and assemblers. If you go to an assembler, you choose a blade and the furniture (handle, ferrules, case) and he will put it all together for you and sculpt the case so that everything fits together nicely.

The khukri is almost certainly an Assam Rifles model, from Himalayan Imports. I believe these are usually made from truck leaf springs. It has a single fuller near the handle, and double fuller on the wider part of the blade.

There are plenty of internet vendors that will sell you a Kriss or a Khukri. One guy I've dealt with for a few things, and whom I recommend without reservation, is Hal Siegel at Therion Arms.
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Steampunk Away
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« Reply #44 on: January 07, 2014, 03:59:49 pm »

I'm trying to stay on th cheaper but good side of things as I have not recieved any commissions yet to fund a project for personal reasons. Hopefully I will be able to acquire some car leaf springs very soon. I know some people in machining who may be able to point me in the right direction.

And for meteoric iron, I don't believe to much of that is on sale! Shocked
« Last Edit: January 07, 2014, 04:04:58 pm by Steampunk Away » Logged
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« Reply #45 on: January 07, 2014, 10:01:16 pm »

If there is meteoric iron on sale someone please post a link ahaha!
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Keith_Beef
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« Reply #46 on: January 07, 2014, 10:52:20 pm »

If there is meteoric iron on sale someone please post a link ahaha!


There are loads of meteorite fragments for sale. If you want to use it to make knife blades, you go for relatively cheap, but pure iron in small fragments. More expensive pieces are desirable for the visible structure in slices or for large pieces with attractive shapes.

Here's a link to get started.
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Steampunk Away
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« Reply #47 on: January 07, 2014, 11:08:28 pm »

So I would want a hexahedrite?

Are there any other weapons made out of meteoric iron? I know Ghengis Khan's Sword of Mars was.
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Keith_Beef
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« Reply #48 on: January 07, 2014, 11:20:41 pm »

https://www.google.fr/search?q=meteoric+iron+for+knife+making

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ferrous_metallurgy#Hematitic_and_meteoric_iron

You might also want to consider using iron-rich sand, in the Japanese tradition.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Early_Japanese_iron-working_techniques#Japanese_bloomeries

Or do the right thing, and recycle old steel; it's what our ancestors did and is certainly in the Steampunk ethos. Springs are usually around 0.6% to 0.8% carbon and are water-quenching steels; excellent all-round steel for a blade, easy to heat-treat at home, and widely and inexpensively available.
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Steampunk Away
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« Reply #49 on: January 07, 2014, 11:25:35 pm »

I do not really have any old steel, but I am looking at leaf springs in cars.

Have you made any weapons using recycled steel? Any really unique ones?
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