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Author Topic: Sherlock..  (Read 2021 times)
Rockula
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« Reply #25 on: January 13, 2014, 12:17:18 pm »

I think this series was superb.

But anyone who thinks they can write a better one...

http://www.theatlantic.com/entertainment/archive/2014/01/great-news-now-anyone-can-write-and-publish-a-sherlock-holmes-story/282897/
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« Reply #26 on: January 13, 2014, 10:11:02 pm »

I've very nearly had my fill of "fans". A more unpleasant, nit-picky, impossible to please lot you'll ever have the misfortune to meet.

As a fan I would like to say I resemble that remark.

And just to add a note of dissent, I haven't enjoyed this season at all. All filla no thrilla for me. The first season was a clever reimagining of how the stories may have panned out in the modern era, less focused on that in the second season and this season not at all and I think it suffered for it.

You can argue that Brett did the definitive canon Holmes (don't mention the Sussex vampire though) and therefore this one can do something new, but if you lose the essence of Holmes then you end up with someone who does vaguely Holmesian things and end up with House or Elementary.

Interestingly the first Guy Ritchie Holmes film despite being something of a Steampunk romp still had that focus on the nature of the character, whereas the second lost that and turned him into Bulldog Drummond and was much weaker because of it.

But what do I know, if the critics like it and enough people tune in I'm sure they'll be more and they'll find still more amusing ways to kill him and then bring him back.


I resemble that remark too, I love the Brett series (have the complete set), the downy was on (2nd one was abit weak).
Elementary is a bit of a distraction. but Sherlock has been lacking.(3 lowsy episodes, BBC must have got bored again)
Nevermind BBC's version of The Musketeers" start next saturday!
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« Reply #27 on: January 14, 2014, 10:19:33 am »

For those of us on this side of the pond who don't get BBCA, here's a wonderful little teaser (made by college students in NYC):

SHERLOCK - The Musical (Season 3)


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« Reply #28 on: January 15, 2014, 05:06:39 pm »

Having not read the books (I own some beautiful versions of them, but I can't bear to bend the spines and read them...so cheap second hand ones must be sought), I have no basis for how the character 'should' be. However, the last episode of this series seemed to portray Sherlock as a bit more ruthless and logical than usual? He seemed to develop throughout the series, I couldn't decide if he was perhaps in love with John, but then his ultimate logic is part of the humour of the program.

Yes, I thoroughly enjoyed it Smiley Can't wait for Musketeers!
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4_0_4
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« Reply #29 on: January 15, 2014, 06:30:40 pm »

Having not read the books (I own some beautiful versions of them, but I can't bear to bend the spines and read them...so cheap second hand ones must be sought), I have no basis for how the character 'should' be. However, the last episode of this series seemed to portray Sherlock as a bit more ruthless and logical than usual? He seemed to develop throughout the series, I couldn't decide if he was perhaps in love with John, but then his ultimate logic is part of the humour of the program.

Yes, I thoroughly enjoyed it Smiley Can't wait for Musketeers!

Dont tell me Moffats behind that too..
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« Reply #30 on: January 15, 2014, 06:33:42 pm »

Having not read the books (I own some beautiful versions of them, but I can't bear to bend the spines and read them...so cheap second hand ones must be sought), I have no basis for how the character 'should' be. However, the last episode of this series seemed to portray Sherlock as a bit more ruthless and logical than usual? He seemed to develop throughout the series, I couldn't decide if he was perhaps in love with John, but then his ultimate logic is part of the humour of the program.

Yes, I thoroughly enjoyed it Smiley Can't wait for Musketeers!

Dont tell me Moffats behind that too..


No, apparently it's a fellow called Toby Haynes, who between writing car and death star manuals, wrote a few episodes of Dr Who and Sherlock...so I imagine he is of a similar ilk.
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4_0_4
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Hi Forest , hows Fanny?


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« Reply #31 on: January 15, 2014, 06:50:39 pm »

Having not read the books (I own some beautiful versions of them, but I can't bear to bend the spines and read them...so cheap second hand ones must be sought), I have no basis for how the character 'should' be. However, the last episode of this series seemed to portray Sherlock as a bit more ruthless and logical than usual? He seemed to develop throughout the series, I couldn't decide if he was perhaps in love with John, but then his ultimate logic is part of the humour of the program.

Yes, I thoroughly enjoyed it Smiley Can't wait for Musketeers!

Dont tell me Moffats behind that too..


No, apparently it's a fellow called Toby Haynes, who between writing car and death star manuals, wrote a few episodes of Dr Who and Sherlock...so I imagine he is of a similar ilk.

The BBC are worse than the bloody Mafia ... no wonder Saville & cohorts got away with what they did.

One for all , and all for one indeed.



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ForestB
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« Reply #32 on: January 15, 2014, 07:44:40 pm »

Well I enjoyed these three, and hope that they don't wait too long to make the next series!
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« Reply #33 on: January 15, 2014, 08:26:18 pm »

Having not read the books (I own some beautiful versions of them, but I can't bear to bend the spines and read them...so cheap second hand ones must be sought), I have no basis for how the character 'should' be. However, the last episode of this series seemed to portray Sherlock as a bit more ruthless and logical than usual? He seemed to develop throughout the series, I couldn't decide if he was perhaps in love with John, but then his ultimate logic is part of the humour of the program.

Yes, I thoroughly enjoyed it Smiley Can't wait for Musketeers!

Dont tell me Moffats behind that too..


No, apparently it's a fellow called Toby Haynes, who between writing car and death star manuals, wrote a few episodes of Dr Who and Sherlock...so I imagine he is of a similar ilk.

The BBC are worse than the bloody Mafia ... no wonder Saville & cohorts got away with what they did.

One for all , and all for one indeed.

Amazing, reliable creators continue to be hired to make TV shows after they've proved themselves on other TV shows, while, presumably, molesting children in the 1970s.

At least you're in Sweden, and aren't paying for it, then you might have something to complain about.

You could always watch something else that you might like, I understand there are detectives in sweaters over there, that might suit your palette better.

Wink

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lientie
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bethanlientie
« Reply #34 on: January 15, 2014, 10:19:57 pm »

Loved the series, was not disappointed at all. There did seem to be more focus on character development compared to crime solving, but it was just as entertaining as previous series, so didn't really see that as a problem. I don't understand the whole hating things just because Moffat was involved..I get the feeling a lot of the people complaining about that would like the series if they didn't know he'd written any of it.

Did like the little references to the Hobbit through it, if it was that..Thinking particularly of Sherlock and Mycroft hiding outside the family home smoking and talking about dragons Tongue
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« Reply #35 on: January 16, 2014, 02:43:45 am »

I have loved all three of the episodes in this series.

Unfortunately with classic stories like the Sherlock series you are bound to upset some people with any adaptation ( I personally think Peter Jackson should be hung, drawn and quartered for the way he butchered The Lord of the Rings). Moffat and Gatiss have done a splendid job with the modernisation of the characters - (How does one develope a memory palace?) - even the classic Jeremy Brett adaptation had it's faults.

I eagerly await the next series.
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« Reply #36 on: January 16, 2014, 09:58:02 am »

(How does one develope a memory palace?) -

By developing visualisation initially and then starting with a very familar but small room that you visualise walking around.  You place items you wish to remember attached to familar objects in the room.  In this way you should be able to move around the room 'remembering' each item in turn.

As you become more proficient you can build a fantasy palace with as many rooms and corridors as you require.
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« Reply #37 on: January 16, 2014, 03:32:20 pm »

(How does one develope a memory palace?) -

By developing visualisation initially and then starting with a very familar but small room that you visualise walking around.  You place items you wish to remember attached to familar objects in the room.  In this way you should be able to move around the room 'remembering' each item in turn.

As you become more proficient you can build a fantasy palace with as many rooms and corridors as you require.

Oooooo they're everso good - I read a Derren Brown book years ago about them, and since then although my memory isn't brilliant when I employ the visual techniques learnt it works every time. It even helps me sleep as I have a room for say aerial hoop and pole dancing, that I use to remember things I've learnt, or routines I need to remember. And they're fun to frolick in (without sounding like a crazy person).
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Silk Willoughby
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« Reply #38 on: January 16, 2014, 05:22:49 pm »

The idea of memory palaces has intrigued me ever since I came across the concept in a Hannibal Lecter story.
I have for many years experienced something similar which I called my "dream cavern" - a series of caves in the Yorkshire dales - where I could visit with beloved lost pets and pleasant experiences, but the idea of developing one as a memory recall assist had not occured to me until I read of such in the Lecter novel.

It would be interesting to hear from other folks to see if the technique has helped them. I do not know if it is the onset of age and general decrepitude affecting me, but my memory is getting worse - particularly with peoples names. I have spent a lot of years, (and a fair bit of money) filling my mind, and as I put it - "the hard drives are full but the data retrieval system is knackered!"

I think I will give it a go.
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Drew P
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« Reply #39 on: January 21, 2014, 02:51:12 pm »

Detectives in sweaters, aye?

Would these be female detectives? Crap, that was out loud and off topic!
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« Reply #40 on: January 21, 2014, 03:17:18 pm »

They would be, look up Forbrydelsen.
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« Reply #41 on: January 22, 2014, 01:52:39 am »

Another bit of amusement I found...Yes, yes, I know I'm perpetually late to the party, but I think the posters on this thread will enjoy it regardless.

SHERLOCK Recap: Puppet Edition


Cheers!
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creagmor
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« Reply #42 on: March 17, 2014, 06:37:30 pm »

@Silk Willoughby. While I enjoyed the Jeremy Brett series, I can understand how others might not. Just as I shun the rap and hip hop music, mostly because of my age, I can see how others might enjoy it, "Everyone to their own taste", and all that. I would, however, appreciate it if you would describe the problems you found. Being a pedantic pettifogger I didn't feel the series was perfect; who knows there may be some points on which we totally agree.

BTW it has puzzled me on occasion why the most often filmed of his stories, The Hound of The Baskervilles, is the story in which Holmes appears least!  
« Last Edit: March 17, 2014, 06:41:28 pm by creagmor » Logged

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« Reply #43 on: March 17, 2014, 07:56:07 pm »

@Silk Willoughby. While I enjoyed the Jeremy Brett series, I can understand how others might not. Just as I shun the rap and hip hop music, mostly because of my age, I can see how others might enjoy it, "Everyone to their own taste", and all that. I would, however, appreciate it if you would describe the problems you found. Being a pedantic pettifogger I didn't feel the series was perfect; who knows there may be some points on which we totally agree.

BTW it has puzzled me on occasion why the most often filmed of his stories, The Hound of The Baskervilles, is the story in which Holmes appears least!  





In actuality, Holmes appears throughout it; one does not realize that fact, though, until after he reveals himself, and that he has been staying in the area of the neolithic(?)  ruins out on the moor. In essence, he's been in the action in the book and onscreen in the TV episode (or movie, or whatever) without actually being seen as himself, and simply referred to only in veiled terms/representations.

The Jeremy Brett version made this clear (one of the main reasons why I prefer that group's handling of it), but only in hindsight in keeping with the original writings (the obscure figure and hand receiving Watson's surreptitiously laid-aside correspondence from the village storekeeper/mail clerk, which had to be imagined by the reader in Conan Doyle's story), and later in the rather overt and obvious boy-with-lunch sequence just prior to the discovery of Holmes' hideout by Watson and the archaeology fellow. He's thus in the story/program but not so you'd realize it's him until after his actions are revealed.
« Last Edit: March 17, 2014, 08:18:55 pm by MWBailey » Logged

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« Reply #44 on: March 17, 2014, 08:54:47 pm »

Perhaps I should have said he had considerably less "screen time" than in any of the other tales. Of the two Watson is really the main character in it.

I have seen adaptations where the Stapleton was played by William Shatner, and one where Holmes was played by Matt Frewer (sp?) of Max Head room fame.

Slightly off subject, but one pastiche I enjoyed, but I never see mentioned, is a twist on the Sign of Four novel. Holmes was ably portrayed by Charlton Heston, and Miss Mary Moriston was leading the pair down the primrose path, as it were. one thing that is a must for me is right atmosphere. This film, and the BBC series has it for me. In spite of the fact that it is set in the present Sherlock does as well, lMHO.     
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« Reply #45 on: March 17, 2014, 09:20:34 pm »


The Holmes stories are somewhat unusual in that while Holmes is the 'hero' in the conventional sense they are very much told through the lens of Watson and there are actually quite a few stories where a lot of what Holmes does is pretty much unreported. Often it seems that Watson is used as a distraction whicle Holmes goes about more clandestine investigations, the also tend to be the stories where Holmes gets involved in more physical and dangerous actvities which are more 007 than Poirot.

This is perhaps part of the reason why film and TV adaptions have traditionally portrayed Holmes as more of a purely cerebral crime solver as a lot of the action is only ever reported second hand.
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creagmor
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« Reply #46 on: March 18, 2014, 06:01:47 am »

Watson was also a clever device whereby Holmes could explain his thought processes, etc. I know that another method could have been used, but I like Conan Doyle's solution.

I realize that this is just a matter of taste, but for me the Downey's movies was less than satisfying. There were two things I really did like about it, however. First, while the incidents were never detailed there were mentions of Holmes' combats. One that comes to mind is his encounter with the gate keeper/boxer at the Sholto home in The Sign of Four . It was nice that they had him in a more active role. Another thing is vary small, but in the first Story, A study in Scarlet, Watson mentions that he has a bull pup, but the dog is never mentioned again. I enjoyed how they expanded his role and they way worked him into the stories. I loved the line, "Have you killed my dog; again?" 

BTW Was A Study in Scarlett done with Brett and Hardwick? If there was I have been able to find it.   
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