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Author Topic: Dragon Tamers - A room for those of us with anxiety / depression / etc  (Read 49077 times)
Capitan Diavolo
Gunner
**
Italy Italy



« Reply #75 on: February 02, 2014, 02:19:09 am »

Dear Capitan Diavolo,

When you have eaten, do have a nap by the fire.  No one will rouse you until you are sane again.  Then send your dear wife for some sustenance and a nap while you take care of the little tyrant who now rules your kingdom!  (Bless him forever.)

Love,

Arabella

LOL, thank you, Lady Arabella! God knows how much we need a good nap, indeed! Advice gladly accepted!  Grin
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Lady Ava
Zeppelin Admiral
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United Kingdom United Kingdom

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Adventurer, Dress-maker and General All-Round Awesome.

electrogirlak
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« Reply #76 on: February 04, 2014, 01:26:28 am »

Oh hello there, I didn't know this was a thing... How very useful!
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''I'm a loose bolt in a complete machine. What a match! I'm half-doomed and you're semi-sweet.''
‎"You want steampunk to be a novelty, a LOLcat, a meme. I want it to be my life. Which of us is going to fight harder for it?" - Dimitri Markotin
*DISCLAIMER*     This dungeon is fictional, and any similarities to other dungeons, living or dead, is purely coincidental.


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Camellia Wingnut
Snr. Officer
****
United States Minor Outlying Islands United States Minor Outlying Islands


Take my camel, dear. . . .


« Reply #77 on: February 04, 2014, 01:44:51 am »

Hello.
Tea? Scone?
A lady in (faux) fox furs.
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Take my camel, dear, said my aunt Camellia, climbing down from that animal on her return from high mass. The camel, a white Arabian Dhalur (single hump) from the famous herd of the Ruola tribe, had been a parting present, its saddle-bags stuffed with low-carat [sic] gold and flashy orient gems, from a rich desert tycoon. . . .
Arabella Periscope
Zeppelin Captain
*****
United States United States


Edwardian summer


« Reply #78 on: February 04, 2014, 04:04:13 am »

Do try the French Toast.  It is out of this world.  Anyone would think it was toasted on magical fire, or flambeed in peach brandy, or something.  Very heartwarming.  And you can dry your hankies on the little line in the inglenook if you've been having a crying jag (rage, you know, or grief, or just sheer tiredness.)  

Some of us love the dim glow of these warm niches so much that we hardly ever leave.
« Last Edit: February 04, 2014, 04:23:37 am by Arabella Periscope » Logged

Kenneth: 'If you're so hot, you can tell me how to say she has ideas above her station.'
Brian:'Oh yes, I forgot. It's fairly easy, old boy.
Elle a des idees au-dessus de sa gare.'
Kenneth: 'Idiot.  It's not that kind of station.'

Terence Rattigan 'French Without Tears.'
Lady Ava
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Adventurer, Dress-maker and General All-Round Awesome.

electrogirlak
WWW
« Reply #79 on: February 04, 2014, 12:08:50 pm »

Hello.
Tea? Scone?
A lady in (faux) fox furs.

Tea, scones and support? Well, this is a good idea.
*tucks in*
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frances
Zeppelin Captain
*****
United Kingdom United Kingdom



« Reply #80 on: February 06, 2014, 09:52:39 pm »

Is the home-made meringue out yet.  All that sweet crunchy sugeriness is a wonderful stomach filler and brain/mouth diversion.  I once had one that was the size of a dinner-plate. (Though I suspect one was meant to share it with at least two others.  he he he).
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walking stick
Zeppelin Admiral
******
England England


« Reply #81 on: February 06, 2014, 10:27:01 pm »

Yes, lots of them but only as big as you can eat one handed.  whipped cream, fresh fruit and various other things you may want with your meringues are on the side table next to the stone griffin.
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frances
Zeppelin Captain
*****
United Kingdom United Kingdom



« Reply #82 on: February 07, 2014, 05:51:59 pm »

I love the way the griffin is lit from underneath so you get great depth to those shadows.
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Lady Ava
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Adventurer, Dress-maker and General All-Round Awesome.

electrogirlak
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« Reply #83 on: February 07, 2014, 07:59:18 pm »

I LIKE MERINGUE.
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Madasasteamfish
A clanger waiting to be dropped......
Board Moderator
Rogue Ætherlord
**
United Kingdom United Kingdom


09madasafish
« Reply #84 on: February 07, 2014, 09:01:21 pm »

I LIKE MERINGUE.



I LIKE TRAINS!

I Like Trains
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I made a note in my diary on the way over here. Simply says; "Bugger!"

"DON'T THINK OF IT AS DYING, JUST THINK OF IT AS LEAVING EARLY TO AVOID THE RUSH."
Camellia Wingnut
Snr. Officer
****
United States Minor Outlying Islands United States Minor Outlying Islands


Take my camel, dear. . . .


« Reply #85 on: February 07, 2014, 11:44:01 pm »

Perhaps our kind Hostess might consider a miniature serving train which puffs around the buffet pulling dishes, such as the extravagant Rajahs of old had on their dining tables.
C.W.
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CorneliaCarton
Zeppelin Captain
*****
Scotland Scotland

Gravatar


« Reply #86 on: February 08, 2014, 12:55:33 am »

So I had a pretty serious anxiety attack today. Came completely out of the blue. In public, no less.
And I still feel like I can't breathe almost 12 hours later. And I'm still getting that horrible hollow feeling in my chest, you know the one that feels like your stomach just dropped and all you can feel is your heartbeat. Someone please reassure me that this is normal, because I was convinced I was dying....
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Ginny Audriana Irondust Moravia. Pleased t' meet ya.
Arabella Periscope
Zeppelin Captain
*****
United States United States


Edwardian summer


« Reply #87 on: February 08, 2014, 02:37:12 am »

It is absolutely normal.  A feeling that you are about to die is what triggers the panic, whether the cause is claustrophobia or agoraphobia or whatever starts you off in the first place. That is why your whole system is still reverberating; it thinks you really did fall off a cliff or have a near-escape from death.  Have you had your heart tested?  There is an inherited thing, mitral valve fluttering of the heart, that can lead to panic attacks that feel like heart attacks.  The two occur together so often that you may be able to get treatment by that route more quickly.

Meanwhile, dim the lights, wrap up, drink something, lower your blood pressure with a purring cat and imagine you can recover in here by the fire.  It is completely private.
« Last Edit: February 08, 2014, 02:45:56 am by Arabella Periscope » Logged
walking stick
Zeppelin Admiral
******
England England


« Reply #88 on: February 11, 2014, 09:03:27 pm »

Asked for help with my emotional condition it's been referred to a local hospital, don't know if this is good news or not.
Had to leave the first social event I've been to this year,  music weekend, too ill to listen Saturday night, left event early on Sunday whilst I was still fit to travel.  Sick and tired of being sick and tired so much of the time.
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frances
Zeppelin Captain
*****
United Kingdom United Kingdom



« Reply #89 on: February 11, 2014, 09:44:27 pm »

Well, walking stick, I hope that you have a nice purring pussy-cat who is taking advantage of the still lap whilst it can.
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walking stick
Zeppelin Admiral
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England England


« Reply #90 on: February 11, 2014, 09:57:32 pm »

I like cats but, as I have already mentioned, I am allergic to them.
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Arabella Periscope
Zeppelin Captain
*****
United States United States


Edwardian summer


« Reply #91 on: February 12, 2014, 12:35:03 am »



There is a nice little hypoallergenic dog who knows all about being nervous!
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Madasasteamfish
A clanger waiting to be dropped......
Board Moderator
Rogue Ætherlord
**
United Kingdom United Kingdom


09madasafish
« Reply #92 on: February 12, 2014, 10:38:36 am »

I'm just feeling so down lately, largely thanks to my job hunting going nowhere fast.

I mean I know there are jobs out there, and I could easily get one, but I have no interest in working in what's offered at a Graduate level (usually Sales, Marketing or Headhunting) since I'd be doing it for the sake of a wage slip, and having done that before I don't want to spend my working life working at a job where I'm just going through the motions and counting the minutes until I can leave. But it's an uphill struggle just to find anything I think I'd enjoy and or want to apply for, and even then I'm lucky to get anything beyond a simple automatic reply saying in essence 'Thanks for applying, we'll be in touch.' and I can't see things getting any better.
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Camellia Wingnut
Snr. Officer
****
United States Minor Outlying Islands United States Minor Outlying Islands


Take my camel, dear. . . .


« Reply #93 on: February 12, 2014, 09:34:44 pm »

My Dear Mr. M.A.A.S. Fish,
The lady in the (faux) fox furs feels great sympathy. To find your place in the world, and to have enough to live on in return, is the most difficult equation in life; and I could never do equations! Life should not be a sum; I always felt that to sell my time was horrible. There's only so much!
Luckily, your generation has one arena which we never had, which is the Aethernet. Not only can you find friendly concern here, but you can seek out ideas and advice and even earn money in the privacy of your home. Use it to find your aptitudes, your proper milieu, even perhaps another country where you really belong, maybe one which still runs steam trains? Try out personas!
I know it is dreadfully difficult to find a niche, and modern Britain is a rock and a hard place for economic survival. Many people of imagination have to trade down in order to be happy, although not prosperous. I believe you recently had a museum job; why not try that elsewhere? A museum of steam machinery? My favourite job ever was to be a steward in a museum, just walking round and round and dreaming - could you be a security guard in a place like that? I was, of course, of course, a volunteer; but I loved it. I would have been a cleaner there if I could, although I have a Ph.D. I got quite fond of the Beaker Burial skeleton. To be paid even a pittance for such a job could bring happiness.
Best of British luck,
C.W.
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Madasasteamfish
A clanger waiting to be dropped......
Board Moderator
Rogue Ætherlord
**
United Kingdom United Kingdom


09madasafish
« Reply #94 on: February 12, 2014, 10:13:31 pm »

My Dear Mr. M.A.A.S. Fish,
The lady in the (faux) fox furs feels great sympathy. To find your place in the world, and to have enough to live on in return, is the most difficult equation in life; and I could never do equations! Life should not be a sum; I always felt that to sell my time was horrible. There's only so much!
Luckily, your generation has one arena which we never had, which is the Aethernet. Not only can you find friendly concern here, but you can seek out ideas and advice and even earn money in the privacy of your home. Use it to find your aptitudes, your proper milieu, even perhaps another country where you really belong, maybe one which still runs steam trains? Try out personas!
I know it is dreadfully difficult to find a niche, and modern Britain is a rock and a hard place for economic survival. Many people of imagination have to trade down in order to be happy, although not prosperous. I believe you recently had a museum job; why not try that elsewhere? A museum of steam machinery? My favourite job ever was to be a steward in a museum, just walking round and round and dreaming - could you be a security guard in a place like that? I was, of course, of course, a volunteer; but I loved it. I would have been a cleaner there if I could, although I have a Ph.D. I got quite fond of the Beaker Burial skeleton. To be paid even a pittance for such a job could bring happiness.
Best of British luck,
C.W.

Thanks for the vote of confidence. I've just finished a two week work experience placement (technically I was a volunteer) in a local industrial museum which I absolutely loved (even if it isn't what I actually want to do) but I've applied for a few other jobs in museums which I'm trying to remain hopeful about, and I've got another voluntary thing in a National Trust property lined up in the next few weeks, and possibly another one in the museum I was working at in a more technical role (hopefully) which is all experience which will hopefully add up enough to come to something. The problem is the only way in at the moment is volunteering and hoping you get taken on as staff (usually on an absolutely cr*p contract) or use it to get the experience to get a job elsewhere (which is of course of no use to me since after 4 years of university I'm almost entirely monetarily reliant on my parents and I am in such penury that I can't afford to move out and work for nothing indefinitely without earning some form of income). The best I can hope for at the minute is to get some part time work in order to put some cash in my pocket and then volunteer in my free time to get the experience I need to get into my desired field. Maybe with luck I might be able to find work somewhere in the Commonwealth, or if the Scotland leaves the UK the economy north of the border may improve sufficiently to provide me with an opportunity.
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Camellia Wingnut
Snr. Officer
****
United States Minor Outlying Islands United States Minor Outlying Islands


Take my camel, dear. . . .


« Reply #95 on: February 12, 2014, 11:24:10 pm »

My Dear Fellow,
It seems that we agree upon the subject of happiness in work. If you can volunteer and stick like a burr until you are indispensable. . . . But it is risky. Management, our natural enemy, is liable to use up volunteers and then replace them with others. What about curating? An odd skill would help in the right niche.
Carry On,
C.W.
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Madasasteamfish
A clanger waiting to be dropped......
Board Moderator
Rogue Ætherlord
**
United Kingdom United Kingdom


09madasafish
« Reply #96 on: February 12, 2014, 11:33:18 pm »

My Dear Fellow,
It seems that we agree upon the subject of happiness in work. If you can volunteer and stick like a burr until you are indispensable. . . . But it is risky. Management, our natural enemy, is liable to use up volunteers and then replace them with others. What about curating? An odd skill would help in the right niche.
Carry On,
C.W.

Well things are likely to remain in their present situation for a good while longer, I suppose I've just got to stay hopeful and wait for the right opportunity to come up (unfortunately there are less than a dozen places national wide where I would be able to put my niche expertise to use).
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Flightless Phoenix
Zeppelin Captain
*****
United Kingdom United Kingdom



WWW
« Reply #97 on: February 13, 2014, 02:59:51 pm »

Hang in there Madasasteamfih. It sounds like our situations are broadly similar. I've been doing the 'working part-time in a dull job so that I can volunteer in my spare time' route for a year now and it's starting to pay off... very slowly, but I can see a light at the end of the tunnel and I don't think it's a train. The most interesting thing I have discovered is that I'll volunteer for something because one aspect of it interests me, but in the end the most valuable thing may be a different area with transferable skills, but I enjoy it just the same. Stay hopeful and be as visible as you can to the people who already work in your niche field. Make connections, especially with people who have managed to get funding for their projects (work with them and find out how they managed it!)

My difficulty is that I feel like I'm juggling a lot of balls when I'm rather ill-equiped to do so, given the state of my mental health. My PhD thesis and I are on very bad terms, and the mere mention of certain persons at my university is enough to trigger a panic attack, I'm working on several small projects in addition to this and my home situation is less than ideal. This means that I may be missing some valuable opportunities. I opened an email on Monday (sent Sunday) about an informal meeting for coffee to discuss a volunteering opportunity. Monday was a bad day emotionally so I didn't reply to the email until Tuesday lunchtime. I've had no response so far. My boyfriend suggests that this is because I was too slow replying and have shown myself to be unreliable. I can't stop worrying about it now... It's also making me check me email 6 times a day in a paranoid fashion because normally I only check a couple of times a week at the moment (especially the uni email address because of the associated emotional rollercoster).

Right, i'll be over by the fire with some crumpets, a hot water bottle and a nervous twitch if anyone needs me...
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cemeteryresearcher.com

'a lighthearted academic blog about funerary practice' - Updates Sundays*

*gremlins permitting
walking stick
Zeppelin Admiral
******
England England


« Reply #98 on: February 13, 2014, 06:38:45 pm »

Hot crumpets with all the trimmings, nice soft lap blanket and a well placed hot water bottle are yours.  Also, if you wish, a visit from the being that gives foot and back rubs.
Your boyfriend is not being helpful,  that's a very negative interpretation with no evidence.  If one opportunity does not work out you are active enough to find another. 
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frances
Zeppelin Captain
*****
United Kingdom United Kingdom



« Reply #99 on: February 13, 2014, 09:10:36 pm »

I've just found these two furry bunny-rabbits outside the door.  Aren't they adorable.  Who would like the floppy-eared one and who would like the grey one with upright ears to cuddle?
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